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1. WO1997018209 - ALPHA 1a ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS

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TITLE OF THE INVENTION
ALPHA 1a ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS

FIELD OF THE INVENTION:
This invention relates to certain novel compounds and derivatives thereof, their synthesis, and their use as selective alpha la adrenoceptor antagonists. More particularly, the compounds of the present invention are useful for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
Human adrenergic receptors are integral membrane proteins which have been classified into two broad classes, the alpha and the beta adrenergic receptors. Both types mediate the action of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system upon binding of catecholamines, norepinephrine and epinephrine.
Norepinephrine is produced by adrenergic nerve endings, while epinephrine is produced by the adrenal medulla. The binding affinity of adrenergic receptors for these compounds forms one basis of the classification: alpha receptors bind norepinephrine more strongly than epinephrine and much more strongly than the synthetic compound isoproterenol. The binding affinity of these hormones is reversed for the beta receptors. In many tissues, the functional responses, such as smooth muscle contraction, induced by alpha receptor activation are opposed to responses induced by beta receptor binding.
Subsequently, the functional distinction between alpha and beta receptors was further highlighted and refined by the
pharmacological characterization of these receptors from various animal and tissue sources. As a result, alpha and beta adrenergic receptors were further subdivided into α1, α2, ß1 , and ß2 subtypes. Functional differences between α1 and α2 receptors have been recognized, and compounds which exhibit selective binding between these two subtypes have been developed. Thus, in WO 92/0073, the selective ability of the R(+) enantiomer of terazosin to selectively bind to adrenergic receptors of the alpha 1 subtype was reported. The α12 selectivity of this compound was disclosed as being significant because agonist stimulation of the α2 receptors was said to inhibit secretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine, while antagonism of the α2 receptor was said to increase secretion of these hormones. Thus, the use of non-selective alpha-adrenergic blockers, such as phenoxybenzamine and phentolamine, is limited by their α2 adrenergic receptor mediated induction of increased plasma catecholamine concentration and the attendant physiological sequelae (increased heart rate and smooth muscle contraction).
For a general background on the α-adrenergic receptors, the reader's attention is directed to Robert R. Ruffolo, Jr., α-Adrenoreceptors: Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology, (Progress in Basic and Clinical Pharmacology series, Karger, 1991 ), wherein the basis of α12 subclassification, the molecular biology, signal transduction (G-protein interaction and location of the significant site for this and ligand binding activity away from the 3'-terminus of alpha adrenergic receptors), agonist structure-activity relationships, receptor functions, and therapeutic applications for compounds exhibiting α-adrenergic receptor affinity was explored.
The cloning, sequencing and expression of alpha receptor subtypes from animal tissues has led to the subclassification of the α1 receptors into α1a, (Lomasney, et al., J. Biol. Chem., 266:6365-6369 (1991 ), rat α1a; Bruno et al., BBRC, 179: 1485-1490 (1991 ), human α1a), α1b (Cotecchia, et al., PNAS, 85;7159-7163 (1988), hamster α1b; Libert, et al., Science. (1989), dog α1b; Ramarao, et al., J. Biol.
Chem., 267:21936-21945 (1992), human α1b), and most recently, in a study using bovine brain, a new α1c subtype was proposed (Schwinn, et al., J. Biol. Chem., 265:8183-8189 (1990); Hirasawa et al., BBRC
195:902-909 (1993), described the cloning, functional expression and tissue distribution of a human α1c adrenergic receptor; Hoehe et al., Human Mol. Genetics 1(5):349 (8/92) noted the existence of a two-allele Pst1 restriction fragment polymorphism in the α1c adrenergic receptor gene; another study suggests that there may even be an alpha 1d receptor subtype, see Perez et al., Mol. Pharm., 40:876-883, 1992). Each α1 receptor subtype exhibits its own pharmacologic and tissue specificities. Schwinn and coworkers noted that the cloned bovine α1c receptor exhibited pharmacological properties proposed for the α1a subtype. Nonetheless, based on its non-expression in tissues where the α1a subtype is expressed, and its sensitivity to chloroethylclonidine, the receptor was given a new designation.
The differences in the α-adrenergic receptor subtypes have relevance in pathophysiologic conditions. Benign prostatic hyperplasia, also known as benign prostatic hypertrophy or BPH, is an illness typically affecting men over fifty years of age, increasing in severity with increasing age. The symptoms of the condition include, but are not limited to, increased difficulty in urination and sexual dysfunction.
These symptoms are induced by enlargement, or hyperplasia, of the prostate gland. As the prostate increases in size, it impinges on free-flow of fluids through the male urethra. Concommitantly, the increased noradrenergic innervation of the enlarged prostate leads to an increased adrenergic tone of the bladder neck and urethra, further restricting the flow of urine through the urethra.
In benign prostatic hyperplasia, the male hormone 5α-dihydrotestosterone has been identified as the principal culprit. The continual production of 5α-dihydrotestosterone by the male testes induces incremental growth of the prostate gland throughout the life of the male. Beyond the age of about fifty years, in many men, this enlarged gland begins to obstruct the urethra with the pathologic symptoms noted above.
The elucidation of the mechanism summarized above has resulted in the recent development of effective agents to control, and in many cases reverse, the pernicious advance of BPH. In the forefront of these agents is Merck & Co., Inc.s' product PROSCAR® (finasteride). The effect of this compound is to inhibit the enzyme testosterone 5-alpha reductase, which converts testosterone into 5α-dihydrotesterone, resulting in a reduced rate of prostatic enlargement, and often reduction in prostatic mass.

The development of such agents as PROSCAR® bodes well for the long-term control of BPH. However, as may be appreciated from the lengthy development of the syndrome, its reversal also is not immediate. In the interim, those males suffering with BPH continue to suffer, and may in fact lose hope that the agents are working sufficiently rapidly.
In response to this problem, one solution is to identify pharmaceutically active compounds which complement slower-acting therapeutics by providing acute relief. Agents which induce relaxation of the urethral smooth muscle, by binding to alpha 1 adrenergic receptors, thus reducing the increased adrenergic tone due to the disease, would be good candidates for this activity. Thus, one such agent is alfuzosin, which is reported in EP 0 204597 to induce urination in cases of prostatic hyperplasia. Likewise, in WO 92/0073, the selective ability of the R(+) enantiomer of terazosin to bind to
adrenergic receptors of the α1 subtype was reported. In addition, in WO 92/161213, hereby incorporated by reference, combinations of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitory compounds and alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockers (terazosin, doxazosin, prazosin, bunazosin, indoramin, alfuzosin) were disclosed. However, no information as to the α1a, α1 b, or α1c subtype specificity of these compounds was provided as this data and its relevancy to the treatment of BPH was not known. Current therapy for BPH uses existing non-selective alpha 1 antagonists such as prazosin (Minipress, Pfizer), Terazosin (Hytrin, Abbott) or doxazosin mesylate (Cardura, Pfizer). These non-selective antagonists suffer from side effects related to antagonism of the alpha la and alpha lb receptors in the peripheral vasculature, e.g., orthostatic hypotension and syncope.
Typically, identification of active compounds is
accomplished through use of animal tissues known to be enriched in adrenergic receptors. Thus, rat tissues have been used to screen for potential adrenergic receptor antagonists. However, because of species variability, compounds which appear active in animal tissue may not be active or sufficiently selective in humans. This results in substantial wastage of time and effort, particularly where high volume compound screening programs are employed. There is also the danger that compounds, which might be highly effective in humans, would be missed because of their absence of appreciable affinity for the
heterologous animal receptors. In this regard, it has been noted that even single amino acid changes between the sequence of biologically active proteins in one species may give rise to substantial
pharmacological differences. Thus, Fong et al., (J. Biol. Chem., 267:25668-25671 , 1992) showed that there are 22 divergent amino acid residues between the sequence of the human neurokinin-1 receptor and the homologous rat receptor. They further showed, in studies with mutant receptors, that substitution of only two amino acid residues was both necessary and sufficient to reproduce the rat receptor's antagonist binding affinity in the human receptor. Oksenberg et al., (Nature, 360: 161 -163, 1992) showed that a single amino-acid difference confers major pharmacological variation between the human and the rodent 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors. Likewise, Kuhse et al., (Neuron, 5:867-873, 1990) showed that a single amino-acid exchange alters the pharmacology of the neonatal rat glycine receptor subunit. This difficulty and unpredictability has resulted in a need for a compound screen which will identify compounds that will be active in humans.
These problems were solved by cloning the human adrenergic receptor of the α1c subtype (ATCC CRL 11140) and the use of a screening assay which enables identification of compounds which specifically interact with the human α1c adrenergic receptor. [PCT International Application Publication Nos. WO94/08040, published 14 April 1994 and WO94/10989, published 26 May 1994] As disclosed in the instant patent disclosure, a cloned human α1c adrenergic receptor and a method for identifying compounds which bind the human α1c receptor has now made possible the identification of selective human α1c adrenergic receptor antagonists useful for treating BPH. The instant patent disclosure discloses novel compounds which selectively bind to the human α1c receptor. These compounds are further tested for binding to other human alpha 1 receptor subtypes, as well as counterscreened against other types of receptors, thus defining the specificity of the compounds of the present invention for the human α1c adrenergic receptor.
Compounds of this invention are used to reduce the acute symptoms of BPH. Thus, compounds of this invention may be used alone or in conjunction with a more long-term anti-BPH therapeutics, such as testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, including PROSCAR® (finasteride). Aside from their utility as anti-BPH agents, these compounds may be used to induce highly tissue-specific, localized α1c adrenergic receptor blockade whenever this is desired. Effects of this blockade include reduction of intra-ocular pressure, control of cardiac arrhythmias, and possibly a host of alpha 1c receptor mediated central nervous system events.

NOMENCLATURE
Recently, a new α1 adrenergic receptor (α1-AR)
classification scheme similar to that proposed by Ford, et al. [α1-Adrenoceptor Classification: Sharpening Occam's Razor. Trends in Pharm. Sci. 1994, 15, 167-170] was adopted at the August, 1994 meeting of the International Union of Pharmacology (IUPHAR) in Montreal, Canada. The α1-AR genes formerly known as α1a/d, α1 b and α1c were renamed α 1d, α1 b and α1a, respectively. This new naming system reflects the correspondence between the proteins encoded by the α1a and α1b genes (new IUPHAR nomenclature) and the receptors characterized by traditional pharmacological means as α1A and α1B, respectively, in the literature. Recombinant receptors and receptors characterized pharmacologically in tissues are
distinguished by lowercase and uppercase subscripts, respectively.
The above discussion contained in the Background section used the former classification scheme (i.e., α1a/d, α1b and α1c);
however, hereinafter, the new classification scheme will be utilized (i.e., aid, α1b and α1a). Thus, what was formerly referred to as the α1c receptor (and α1c receptor antagonists) will hereinafter be referred to utilizing the new nomenclature as the α1a receptor (and α1a receptor antagonists).

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The present invention provides compounds for the treatment of urinary obstruction caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The compounds selectively antagonize the human alpha 1a adrenergic receptor at nanomolar and subnanomolar concentrations while exhibiting at least ten fold lower affinity for the alpha Id and alpha 1b human adrenergic receptors and many other G-protein coupled receptors. This invention has the advantage over non-selective alpha 1 adrenoceptor antagonists of reduced side effects related to peripheral adrenergic blockade. Such side effects include orthostatic hypotension, syncope, lethargy, etc. The compounds of the present invention have the structure:


wherein

W is selected from unsubstituted, mono or di-substituted: phenyl, pyridyl, thienyl, furanyl or naphthyl where the substituents on the phenyl, pyridyl, thienyl, furanyl or naphthyl are independently selected from CF3, phenyl, OR4, halogen, C1 -4 alkyl or C3-8 cycloalkyl;

R1 and R2 are each independently selected from hydrogen, cyano, CONR4R5, CO2R4 or SO2R4;

R3 is selected from or ;




R4 and R5 are each independently selected from hydrogen, C1 -8 alkyl or C3-8 cycloalkyl; and

R6 is selected from hydrogen or chloro;

R7 is selected from C1 -8 alkyl,

or
, ;





T, U, X, Y and Z are each independently selected from hydrogen, halogen, C1 -8 alkyl, C3-8 cycloalkyl or OR8;

A is selected from CH or N;

G is selected from H2, O or S;

E is selected from CH2, O or NR8;

R8 is selected from hydrogen, C1 -8 alkyl or C3-8 cycloalkyl,
(CH2)mCO2R4 or (CH2)mCONH2;

each m is independently an integer of from zero to three; and n is an integer of from two to six;
and the pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof.
In one embodiment are the compounds wherein
R3 is selected from

where all other variables are as defined above; and the pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof.
In one class are the compounds wherein
W is selected from unsubstituted or mono-substituted phenyl where the substituent on the phenyl is C1 -4 alkyl or halogen; 2-, 3- or 4-pyridyl; 2- or 3-thienyl; 2- or 3 -furanyl; or unsubstituted, mono- or di-substituted naphthyl where the substituent on the naphthyl is selected from CF3, phenyl, OR4, halogen, C1 -4 alkyl or C3-8 cycloalkyl;

R3 is selected from



and where all other variables are as defined above;
and the pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof.
In a subclass are the compounds wherein
R3 is

and where all other variables are as defined above;
and the pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof.
Illustrative of the invention are the compounds of the formula



wherein
R1 is selected from hydrogen or cyano; and
W is selected from unsubstituted or mono-substituted phenyl where the substituent on phenyl is selected from methyl or halogen;
and where R6 is as defined above;
and the pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof.
An illustration of the invention are the compounds of the formula



wherein W is selected from phenyl, 2-methylphenyl or 2-chlorophenyl; and where R6 is as defined above; and the pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof.
Exemplifying the invention is the compound selected from 4-(4-saccarylbutyl)-2-cyano-1-phenylpiperazine or
4-(propyl-ditolylacetamide)-2-cyano-1-phenylpiperazine;
and the pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof.

Another illustration of the invention is a pharmaceutical composition comprising a therapeutically effective amount of any of the compounds described above and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. Another example of the invention is a pharmaceutical composition made by combining any of the compounds described above and a
pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. Another illustration of the invention is a process for making a pharmaceutical composition comprising combining any of the compounds described above and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier.
Illustrating the invention is the composition further comprising a therapeutically effective amount of a testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor. Preferably, the testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor is a type 1 , a type 2, both a type 1 and a type 2 (i.e., a three component combination comprising any of the compounds described above combined with both a type 1 testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor and a type 2 testosterone 5 -alpha reductase inhibitor) or a dual type 1 and type 2 testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor. More preferably, the testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor is a type 2 testosterone 5 -alpha reductase inhibitor. Most preferably, the
testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor is finasteride.
An example of the invention is a method of treating benign prostatic hyperplasia in a subject in need thereof which comprises administering to the subject a therapeutically effective amount of any of the compounds or pharmaceutical compositions described above.
Further exemplifying the invention is the method of treating BPH wherein the compound or pharmaceutical composition additionally does not cause a fall in blood pressure at dosages effective to alleviate BPH.
An additional illustration of the invention is the method of treating benign prostatic hyperplasia wherein the compound is
administered in combination with a testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor. Preferably, the testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor is finasteride.

Further illustrating the invention is a method of relaxing urethral smooth muscle in a subject in need thereof which comprises administering to the subject a therapeutically effective amount of any of the compounds or pharmaceutical compositions described above.
More specifically exemplifying the invention is the method of relaxing urethral smooth muscle wherein the compound or
pharmaceutical composition additionally does not cause a fall in blood pressures at dosages effective to relax urethral smooth muscle.
More particularly illustrating the invention is the method of relaxing urethral smooth muscle wherein the compound is administered in combination with a testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor;
preferably, the testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor is finasteride.
More specifically illustrating the invention is the use of any of the compounds described above in the preparation of a medicament for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, or for relaxing urethral smooth muscle.
Further exemplifying the invention is a drug which is useful for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia or for relaxing urethral smooth muscle, the effective ingredient of the said drug being any of the compounds descibed above.
More particularly exemplifying the invention is a method of treating a disease which is susceptible to treatment by antagonism of the alpha 1a receptor which comprises administering to a subject in need thereof an amount of any of the compounds described above effective to treat the disease. Diseases which are susceptible to treatment by antagonism of the alpha 1 a receptor include, but are not limited to, BPH, high intraocular pressure, high cholesterol, impotency,
sympathetically mediated pain and cardiac arrhythmia.
Another aspect of the invention is a compound of the formula

wherein

R1 is selected from cyano, CONR4R5, CO2R4 or SO2R4;

R4 and R5 are each independently selected from hydrogen, C1-8 alkyl or C3-8 cycloalkyl; and

R9 is selected from hydrogen, CF3, phenyl, OR4, halogen, C1 -4 alkyl or C3-8 cycloalkyl;
and the pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof. Preferably, R1 is cyano; and R9 is selected from hydrogen, methyl or chloro.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
Representative compounds of the present invention exhibit high selectivity for the human alpha la adrenergic receptor. One implication of this selectivity is that these compounds display selectivity for lowering intraurethral pressure without substantially affecting diastolic blood pressure.
Representative compounds of this invention display submicromolar affinity for the human alpha la adrenergic receptor subtype while displaying at least ten-fold lower affinity for the human alpha 1d and alpha 1b adrenergic receptor subtypes, and many other G-protein coupled human receptors.
These compounds are administered in dosages effective to antagonize the alpha la receptor where such treatment is needed, as in BPH. For use in medicine, the salts of the compounds of this invention refer to non-toxic "pharmaceutically acceptable salts." Other salts may, however, be useful in the preparation of the compounds according to the invention or of their pharmaceutically acceptable salts. Suitable pharmaceutically acceptable salts of the compounds of this invention include acid addition salts which may, for example, be formed by mixing a solution of the compound according to the invention with a solution of a pharmaceutically acceptable acid such as hydrochloric acid, sulphuric acid, fumaric acid, maleic acid, succinic acid, acetic acid, benzoic acid, oxalic acid, citric acid, tartaric acid, carbonic acid or phosphoric acid. Furthermore, where the compounds of the invention carry an acidic moiety, suitable pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof may include alkali metal salts, e.g. sodium or potassium salts; alkaline earth metal salts, e.g. calcium or magnesium salts; and salts formed with suitable organic ligands, e.g. quaternary ammonium salts. Thus, representative pharmaceutically acceptable salts include the following:
Acetate, Benzenesulfonate, Benzoate, Bicarbonate,
Bisulfate, Bitartrate, Borate, Bromide, Calcium, Camsylate, Carbonate, Chloride, Clavulanate, Citrate, Dihydrochloride, Edetate, Edisylate, Estolate, Esylate, Fumarate, Gluceptate, Gluconate, Glutamate,
Glycollylarsanilate, Hexylresorcinate, Hydrabamine, Hydrobromide, Hydrochloride, Hydroxynaphthoate, Iodide, Isothionate, Lactate,
Lactobionate, Laurate, Malate, Maleate, Mandelate, Mesylate,
Methylbromide, Methylnitrate, Methylsulfate, Mucate, Napsylate, Nitrate, N-methylglucamine ammonium salt, Oleate, Oxalate, Pamoate (Embonate), Palmitate, Pantothenate, Phosphate/diphosphate,
Polygalacturonate, Salicylate, Stearate, Sulfate, Subacetate, Succinate, Tannate, Tartrate, Teoclate, Tosylate, Triethiodide and Valerate.
The present invention includes within its scope prodrugs of the compounds of this invention. In general, such prodrugs will be functional derivatives of the compounds of this invention which are readily convertible in vivo into the required compound. Conventional procedures for the selection and preparation of suitable prodrug derivatives are described, for example, in "Design of Prodrugs," ed. H. Bundgaard, Elsevier, 1985. Metabolites of these compounds include active species produced upon introduction of compounds of this invention into the biological milieu.
Where the compounds according to the invention have at least one chiral center, they may accordingly exist as enantiomers.
Where the compounds according to the invention possess two or more chiral centers, they may additionally exist as diastereoisomers. It is to be understood that all such isomers and mixtures thereof are
encompassed within the scope of the present invention. Furthermore, some of the crystalline forms for compounds of the present invention may exist as polymorphs and as such are intended to be included in the present invention. In addition, some of the compounds of the present invention may form solvates with water (i.e., hydrates) or common organic solvents. Such solvates are also encompassed within the scope of this invention.
The term "alkyl" shall mean straight or branched chain alkanes of one to ten total carbon atoms, or any number within this range (i.e., methyl, ethyl, 1 -propyl, 2-propyl, n-butyl, s-butyl, t-butyl, etc.).
The term "alkenyl" shall mean straight or branched chain alkenes of two to ten total carbon atoms, or any number within this range.
The term "aryl" as used herein, except where otherwise specifically defined, refers to unsubstituted, mono- or poly-substituted aromatic groups such as phenyl or naphthyl.
The term "cycloalkyl" shall mean cyclic rings of alkanes of three to eight total carbon atoms (i.e., cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, cyclohexyl, cycloheptyl or cyclooctyl).
Whenever the term "alkyl" or "aryl" or either of their prefix roots appear in a name of a substituent (e.g., aralkoxyaryloxy) it shall be interpreted as including those limitations given above for

"alkyl" and "aryl." Designated numbers of carbon atoms (e.g., C1 - 10) shall refer independently to the number of carbon atoms in an alkyl or cyclic alkyl moiety or to the alkyl portion of a larger substituent in which alkyl appears as its prefix root.

The term "halogen" shall include iodine, bromine, chlorine and fluorine.
The term "substituted" shall be deemed to include multiple degrees of substitution by a named substitutent. The term "poly-substituted" as used herein shall include di-, tri-, tetra- and penta-substitution by a named substituent.
Where multiple substituent moieties are disclosed or claimed, the substituted compound can be independently substituted by one or more of the disclosed or claimed substituent moieties, singly or plurally.
The term heterocycle or heterocyclic ring, as used herein, represents an unsubstituted or substituted stable 5- to 7-membered monocyclic ring system which may be saturated or unsaturated, and which consists of carbon atoms and from one to three heteroatoms selected from N, O or S, and wherein the nitrogen and sulfur
heteroatoms may optionally be oxidized, and the nitrogen heteroatom may optionally be quaternized. The heterocyclic ring may be attached at any heteroatom or carbon atom which results in the creation of a stable structure. Examples of such heterocyclic groups include, but is not limited to, piperidinyl, piperazinyl, oxopiperazinyl, oxopiperidinyl, oxopyrrolidinyl, oxoazepinyl, azepinyl, pyrrolyl, pyrrolidinyl, furanyl, thienyl, pyrazolyl, pyrazolidinyl, imidazolyl, imidazolinyl,
imidazolidinyl, pyridyl, pyrazinyl, pyrimidinyl, pyridazinyl, oxazolyl, oxazolidinyl, isooxazolyl, isoxazolidinyl, morpholinyl, thiazolyl, thiazolidinyl, isothiazolyl, thiadiazolyl, tetrahydropyranyl,
thiamorpholinyl, thiamorpholinyl sulfoxide, thiamorpholinyl sulfone, and oxadiazolyl. Morpholino is the same as morpholinyl.
The term "subject," as used herein refers to an animal, preferably a mammal, most preferably a human, who has been the object of treatment, observation or experiment.
The term "therapeutically effective amount" as used herein means that amount of active compound or pharmaceutical agent that elicits the biological or medicinal response in a tissue, system, animal or human that is being sought by a researcher, veterinarian, medical doctor or other clinician, which includes alleviation of the symptoms of the disease being treated.
The present invention also provides pharmaceutical compositions comprising one or more compounds of this invention in association with a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. Preferably these compositions are in unit dosage forms such as tablets, pills, capsules, powders, granules, sterile parenteral solutions or suspensions, metered aerosol or liquid sprays, drops, ampoules, auto-injector devices or suppositories; for oral, parenteral, intranasal, sublingual or rectal administration, or for administration by inhalation or insufflation.
Alternatively, the compositions may be presented in a form suitable for once-weekly or once -monthly administration; for example, an insoluble salt of the active compound, such as the decanoate salt, may be adapted to provide a depot preparation for intramuscular injection. For preparing solid compositions such as tablets, the principal active ingredient is mixed with a pharmaceutical carrier, e.g. conventional tableting ingredients such as corn starch, lactose, sucrose, sorbitol, talc, stearic acid, magnesium stearate, dicalcium phosphate or gums, and other pharmaceutical diluents, e.g. water, to form a solid
preformulation composition containing a homogeneous mixture of a compound of the present invention, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. When referring to these preformulation compositions as homogeneous, it is meant that the active ingredient is dispersed evenly throughout the composition so that the composition may be readily subdivided into equally effective unit dosage forms such as tablets, pills and capsules. This solid preformulation composition is then subdivided into unit dosage forms of the type described above containing from 0.1 to about 500 mg of the active ingredient of the present invention. The tablets or pills of the novel composition can be coated or otherwise compounded to provide a dosage form affording the advantage of prolonged action. For example, the tablet or pill can comprise an inner dosage and an outer dosage component, the latter being in the form of an envelope over the former. The two components can be separated by an enteric layer which serves to resist disintegration in the stomach and permits the inner component to pass intact into the duodenum or to be delayed in release. A variety of materials can be used for such enteric layers or coatings, such materials including a number of polymeric acids and mixtures of polymeric acids with such materials as shellac, cetyl alcohol and cellulose acetate.
The liquid forms in which the novel compositions of the present invention may be incorporated for administration orally or by injection include aqueous solutions, suitably flavoured syrups, aqueous or oil suspensions, and flavoured emulsions with edible oils such as cottonseed oil, sesame oil, coconut oil or peanut oil, as well as elixirs and similar pharmaceutical vehicles. Suitable dispersing or suspending agents for aqueous suspensions include synthetic and natural gums such as tragacanth, acacia, alginate, dextran, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, methylcellulose, polyvinyl-pyrrolidone or gelatin.
Where the processes for the preparation of the compounds according to the invention give rise to mixtures of stereoisomers, these isomers may be separated by conventional techniques such as
preparative chromatography. The compounds may be prepared in racemic form, or individual enantiomers may be prepared either by enantiospecific synthesis or by resolution. The compounds may, for example, be resolved into their component enantiomers by standard techniques, such as the formation of diastereomeric pairs by salt formation with an optically active acid, such as (-)-di-p-toluoyl-d-tartaric acid and/or (+)-di-p-toluoyl-1-tartaric acid followed by fractional crystallization and regeneration of the free base. The compounds may also be resolved by formation of diastereomeric esters or amides, followed by chromatographic separation and removal of the chiral auxiliary. Alternatively, the compounds may be resolved using a chiral HPLC column.
During any of the processes for preparation of the compounds of the present invention, it may be necessary and/or desirable to protect sensitive or reactive groups on any of the molecules concerned. This may be achieved by means of conventional protecting groups, such as those described in Protective Groups in Organic Chemistry, ed. J.F.W. McOmie, Plenum Press, 1973; and T.W. Greene & P.G.M. Wuts, Protective Groups in Organic Synthesis, John Wiley & Sons, 1991. The protecting groups may be removed at a convenient subsequent stage using methods known from the art.
The specificity of binding of compounds showing affinity for the α1a receptor is shown by comparing affinity to membranes obtained from tranfected cell lines that express the α1a receptor and membranes from cell lines or tissues known to express other types of alpha (e.g., α1 d, α1 b) or beta adrenergic receptors. Expression of the cloned human aid, alpha 1b, and α1a receptors and comparison of their binding properties with known selective antagonists provides a rational way for selection of compounds and discovery of new compounds with predictable pharmacological activities. Antagonism by these compounds of the human alpha 1a adrenergic receptor subtype may be functionally demonstrated in anesthetized animals. These compounds may be used to increase urine flow without exhibiting orthostatic hypotensive effects.
The ability of compounds of the present invention to specifically bind to the alpha l a receptor makes them useful for the treatment of BPH. The specificity of binding of compounds showing affinity for the alpha la receptor is compared against the binding affinities to other types of alpha or beta adrenergic receptors. The human alpha adrenergic receptor of the 1 a subtype was recently identified, cloned and expressed as described in PCT International Application Publication Nos. WO94/08040, published 14 April 1994 and WO 94/21660, published 29 September 1994, each of which is hereby incorporated by reference. The cloned human alpha la receptor, when expressed in mammalian cell lines, is used to discover ligands that bind to the receptor and alter its function. Expression of the cloned human alpha 1d, alpha 1b, and alpha 1a receptors and comparison of their binding properties with known selective antagonists provides a rational way for selection of compounds and discovery of new compounds with predictable pharmacological activities.
Compounds of this invention exhibiting selective human alpha 1 a adrenergic receptor antagonism may further be defined by counterscreening. This is accomplished according to methods known in the art using other receptors responsible for mediating diverse biological functions. [See e.g., PCT International Application
Publication No. WO94/10989, published 26 May 1994; U.S. Patent No. 5,403,847, issued April 4, 1995, the contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference]. Compounds which are both selective amongst the various human alpha 1 adrenergic receptor subtypes and which have low affinity for other receptors, such as the alpha 2 adrenergic receptors, the ß-adrenergic receptors, the muscarinic receptors, the serotonin receptors, and others are particularly
preferred. The absence of these non-specific activities may be confirmed by using cloned and expressed receptors in an analogous fashion to the method disclosed herein for identifying compounds which have high affinity for the various human alpha 1 adrenergic receptors. Furthermore, functional biological tests are used to confirm the effects of identified compounds as alpha 1 a adrenergic receptor antagonists.
The present invention also has the objective of providing suitable topical, oral, systemic and parenteral pharmaceutical
formulations for use in the novel methods of treatment of the present invention. The compositions containing compounds of this invention as the active ingredient for use in the specific antagonism of human alpha 1a adrenergic receptors can be administered in a wide variety of therapeutic dosage forms in conventional vehicles for systemic administration. For example, the compounds can be administered in such oral dosage forms as tablets, capsules (each including timed release and sustained release formulations), pills, powders, granules, elixirs, tinctures, solutions, suspensions, syrups and emulsions, or by injection. Likewise, they may also be administered in intravenous (both bolus and infusion), intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, topical with or without occlusion, or intramuscular form, all using forms well known to those of ordinary skill in the pharmaceutical arts. An effective but non-toxic amount of the compound desired can be employed as an alpha 1 a antagonistic agent.

Advantageously, compounds of the present invention may be administered in a single daily dose, or the total daily dosage may be administered in divided doses of two, three or four times daily. Furthermore, compounds for the present invention can be administered in intranasal form via topical use of suitable intranasal vehicles, or via transdermal routes, using those forms of transdermal skin patches well known to those of ordinary skill in that art. To be administered in the form of a transdermal delivery system, the dosage administration will, of course, be continuous rather than intermittent throughout the dosage regimen.
The dosage regimen utilizing the compounds of the present invention is selected in accordance with a variety of factors including type, species, age, weight, sex and medical condition of the patient; the severity of the condition to be treated; the route of administration; the renal and hepatic function of the patient; and the particular compound thereof employed. A physician or veterinarian of ordinary skill can readily determine and prescribe the effective amount of the drug required to prevent, counter or arrest the progress of the condition. Optimal precision in achieving
concentration of drug within the range that yields efficacy without toxicity requires a regimen based on the kinetics of the drug's availability to target sites. This involves a consideration of the distribution, equilibrium, and elimination of a drug.
In the methods of the present invention, the compounds herein described in detail can form the active ingredient, and are typically administered in admixture with suitable pharmaceutical diluents, excipients or carriers (collectively referred to herein as "carrier" materials) suitably selected with respect to the intended form of administration, that is, oral tablets, capsules, elixirs, syrups and the like, and consistent with conventional pharmaceutical practices.
For instance, for oral administration in the form of a tablet or capsule, the active drug component can be combined with an oral, non-toxic pharmaceutically acceptable inert carrier such as ethanol, glycerol, water and the like. Moreover, when desired or necessary, suitable binders, lubricants, disintegrating agents and coloring agents can also be incorporated into the mixture. Suitable binders include, without limitation, starch, gelatin, natural sugars such as glucose or beta-lactose, corn sweeteners, natural and
synthetic gums such as acacia, tragacanth or sodium alginate,
carboxymethylcellulose, polyethylene glycol, waxes and the like.
Lubricants used in these dosage forms include, without limitation, sodium oleate, sodium stearate, magnesium stearate, sodium
benzoate, sodium acetate, sodium chloride and the like.
Disintegrators include, without limitation, starch, methyl cellulose, agar, bentonite, xanthan gum and the like.
The liquid forms in suitably flavored suspending or dispersing agents such as the synthetic and natural gums, for example, tragacanth, acacia, methyl-cellulose and the like. Other dispersing agents which may be employed include glycerin and the like. For parenteral administration, sterile suspensions and solutions are desired. Isotonic preparations which generally contain suitable preservatives are employed when intravenous administration is desired.
The compounds of the present invention can also be administered in the form of liposome delivery systems, such as small unilamellar vesicles, large unilamellar vesicles and multilamellar vesicles. Liposomes can be formed from a variety of phospholipids, such as cholesterol, stearylamine or phosphatidylcholines.
Compounds of the present invention may also be
delivered by the use of monoclonal antibodies as individual carriers to which the compound molecules are coupled. The compounds of the present invention may also be coupled with soluble polymers as targetable drug carriers. Such polymers can include polyvinyl-pyrrolidone, pyran copolymer, polyhydroxypropylmethacryl-amidephenol, polyhydroxy-ethylaspartamidephenol, or polyethyl-eneoxidepolylysine substituted with palmitoyl residues.
Furthermore, the compounds of the present invention may be coupled to a class of biodegradable polymers useful in achieving controlled release of a drug, for example, polylactic acid,
polyepsilon caprolactone, polyhydroxy butyric acid, polyorthoesters, polyacetals, polydihydro-pyrans, polycyanoacrylates and cross-linked or amphipathic block copolymers of hydrogels.
Compounds of this invention may be administered in any of the foregoing compositions and according to dosage regimens established in the art whenever specific blockade of the human alpha 1 a adrenergic receptor is required.
The daily dosage of the products may be varied over a wide range from 0.01 to 1 ,000 mg per adult human per day. For oral administration, the compositions are preferably provided in the form of tablets containing 0.01 , 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, 25.0, 50.0, 100 and 500 milligrams of the active ingredient for the
symptomatic adjustment of the dosage to the patient to be treated. A medicament typically contains from about 0.01 mg to about 500 mg of the active ingredient, preferably, from about 1 mg to about 100 mg of active ingredient. An effective amount of the drug is ordinarily supplied at a dosage level of from about 0.0002 mg/kg to about 250 mg/kg of body weight per day. Preferably, the range is from about 0.001 to 100 mg/kg of body weight per day, and especially from about 0.001 mg/kg to 7 mg/kg of body weight per day. The compounds may be administered on a regimen of 1 to 4 times per day.
Compounds of this patent disclosure may be used alone at appropriate dosages defined by routine testing in order to obtain optimal antagonism of the human alpha 1a adrenergic receptor while minimizing any potential toxicity. In addition, co-administration or sequential administration of other agents which alleviate the effects of BPH is desirable. Thus, in one embodiment, this includes
administration of compounds of this invention and a human testosterone 5-alpha reductase inhibitor. Included with this embodiment are inhibitors of 5-alpha reductase isoenzyme 2. Many such compounds are now well known in the art and include such compounds as PROSCAR®, (also known as finasteride, a 4-Aza-steroid; see US Patents 4,377,584 and 4,760,071 , for example, hereby incorporated by reference). In addition to PROSCAR®, which is principally active in prostatic tissue due to its selectivity for human 5-α reductase isozyme 2, combinations of compounds which are specifically active in inhibiting testosterone 5-alpha reductase isozyme 1 and compounds which act as dual inhibitors of both isozymes 1 and 2, are useful in combination with compounds of this invention. Compounds that are active as 5 alpha -reductase inhibitors have been described in WO93/23420, EP 0572166; WO 93/23050; WO93/23038, ; WO93/23048; WO93/23041 ; WO93/23040; WO93/23039; WO93/23376; WO93/23419, EP 0572165; WO93/23051 , each of which is hereby incorporated by reference.
The dosages of the alpha la adrenergic receptor and testosterone 5 -alpha reductase inhibitors are adjusted when combined to achieve desired effects. As those skilled in the art will appreciate, dosages of the 5-alpha reductase inhibitor and the alpha la
adrenergic receptor antagonist may be independently optimized and combined to achieve a synergistic result wherein the pathology is reduced more than it would be if either agent were used alone. In accordance with the method of the present invention, the individual components of the combination can be administered separately at different times during the course of therapy or concurrently in divided or single combination forms. The instant invention is
therefore to be understood as embracing all such regimes of
simultaneous or alternating treatment and the term "administering" is to be interpreted accordingly.
Thus, in one preferred embodiment of the present invention, a method of treating BPH is provided which comprises administering to a subject in need of treatment any of the compounds of the present invention in combination with finasteride effective to treat BPH. The dosage of finasteride administered to the subject is about 0.01 mg per subject per day to about 50 mg per subject per day in combination with an alpha 1a antagonist. Preferably, the dosage of finasteride in the combination is about 0.2 mg per subject per day to about 10 mg per subject per day, more preferably, about 1 to about 7 mg per subject to day, most preferably, about 5 mg per subject per day.
For the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, compounds of this invention exhibiting alpha la adrenergic receptor blockade can be combined with a therapeutically effective amount of a 5α-reductase 2 inhibitor, such as finasteride, in addition to a 5α-reductase 1 inhibitor, such as 4,7ß-dimethyl-4-aza-5α-cholestan-3-one, in a single oral, systemic, or parenteral pharmaceutical dosage formulation. Alternatively, a combined therapy can be employed wherein the alpha l a adrenergic receptor antagonist and the 5α-reductase 1 or 2 inhibitor are administered in separate oral,
systemic, or parenteral dosage formulations. See, e.g., U.S. Patent No.'s 4,377,584 and 4,760,071 which describe dosages and
formulations for 5α-reductase inhibitors.
Abbreviations used in the instant specification, particularly the Schemes and Examples, are as follows:



The compounds of the present invention can be prepared readily according to the following reaction schemes and examples, or modifications thereof, using readily available starting materials, reagents and conventional synthesis procedures. In these reactions, it is also possible to make use of variants which are themselves known to those of ordinary skill in this art, but are not mentioned in greater detail. Unless otherwise indicated, all variables are as defined above.
The commercially available amino alcohol 1 was converted to the corresponding chloride 2 via treatment with thionyl chloride. The chloride 2 was displaced by aniline in toluene at 130 °C providing anilinoethylbenzyl amine 3. Treatment of 3 with 2-chloroacrylonitrile in DMF provided the desired cyano piperazine 4 (Phillips, G. B. et al J. Med. Chem. 1992, 32, 743-750). N-benzyl deprotection was accomplished using ACE-Cl in dichloroethane followed by treatment with methanol supplying 5. The cyano piperazine 5 alkylated smoothly with bromobutyl saccharin 10 and bromide 7 providing 6 and 8, respectively (Scheme 1). The saccharin or substituted saccharin
(referred to as "the saccharin moiety") was prepared according to methods known in the art (see for example US Patents 4,818,756;
4,937,343; 4,988,809 and 5,187,276, hereby incorporated by reference for this purpose). The saccharin moiety was then alkylated with a reagent such as 1 ,4-dibromobutane, or a similar reagent, to form the butyl-saccharin moiety 10 (see e.g., Examples 9 and 10). The
bromoalkyl amide 7, was prepared via coupling of the acetic acid derivative 9 to bromopropyl or bromoethyl amine prior to alkylation. Piperazines 4 and 5 were separated easily utilizing chiral HPLC technology and each enantiomer was evaluated individually, 4a and 4b, and 5a and 5b, respectively, Scheme 2.
The regioisomer of piperazine 4 was also prepared 11, 13, and 14 by following the literature procedures (Phillips, G. B. et al., J . Med. Chem. 1992, 32, 743-750) outlined in Scheme 3. Reaction of the previously described 3 with 2,3-dibromopropionamide provided 11 directly, which could be deprotected following the ACE-Cl procedure providing 12. The N-benzyl compound 11 could also be further modified at the carboxamido group via either dehydration providing nitrile 13a or hydrolysis followed by esterification to provide esters 14a. Reaction of the deprotected piperazines 12, 13b, or 14b with bromides 10 or 7 will furnish analogs 15 and 16, Scheme 3.
The phenyl acetic acetamide derivatives 20 were prepared (Scheme 4) via initial alkylation of the enolate of the appropriate phenyl acetic acid 17, derived from treatment of 17 with LiN(TMS)2, with the desired electrophile, for example, 2-iodopropane in THF/HMPA to form 18, followed by acylation with amine 19. Some phenyl acetic acetamide derivatives, for example 23, were not accessible via this route and required the use of the modified Julia Olefination protocol outlined in Scheme 5. Reaction of 2-trimethylsilyl 1 ,3-dithiane with LiN(TMS)2 followed by the addition of a ketone or aldehyde 21 provided the thioketene acetal 22, which after acidic and basic hydrolysis provided the desired substituted acetic acid 23. The typical coupling protocol of 19 and 23 produced the desired phenyl acetic acetamide analogs 24.
Other heterocycles were constructed via the process highlighted in Scheme 6. Starting with commercially available aldehydes 21a, reaction with TMSCN in the presence of ZnI2 provided the intermediate cyanohydrin which after treatment with ammonia followed by HCl provided the desired amino acids 25. These amino acids were then either: 1 ) alkylated following pathway A producing 27A or 2) acylated and subsequently cyclized or bis alkylated (resulting in cyclization) via treatment with either halo acid halides or bis alkyl halides 26 providing 27B. Compounds 27A and 27B, when acylated following the previously described protocol, provided analogs 28A and 28B .


The following examples are provided to further define the invention without, however, limiting the invention to the particulars of these examples.

EXAMPLE 1

N-Benzyl-N-(2-chloroethyl)amine hydrochloride (2).

A solution of N-benzyl-2-aminoethanol (1 , 79.05 g, 0.523 mole) in chloroform (400 mL) was treated with thionyl chloride (80 mL, 1.09 mole) at room temperature. The resulting mixture was heated to reflux (6 h). The solvent was removed in vacuo, the residue dissloved in hot ethanol (1.3 L) and cooled overnight. The solids were collected via suction filtration and dried in vacuo at 65°C (24 h) to afford the title compound 2 as white plates.

EXAMPLE 2

N-Benzyl-N'-phenyl-1 ,2-diaminoethane hydrochloride (3).

A solution of 2 (8.618 g, 42.0 mmol) and aniline (11.75 g, 126 mmol) in toluene (40 mL) was heated to 130°C (1.5 h). The mixture was triturated with dichloromethane (200 mL) and filtered. Recrystallization from ethanol (220 mL) afforded the title compound 3 as white crystals.
1H NMR (DMSO, 400 MHz) δ 7.59 (dd, 2H, J = 1.93, 7.64 Hz), 7.42 (m, 3H), 7.10 (t, 2H, 7.98 Hz), 6.59 (m, 3H), 5.95 (s, 1H), 4.17 (s, 2H), 3.41 (t, 2H, J = 6.38 Hz), 3.04 (t, 2H, J = 6.55 Hz).
FABLRMS m/e 241 g/mole (M++H, C16H20N2 = 241 g/mole.)
HPLC (Vydac; C18; diameter = 4.6 mm; length = 150 mm; gradient = H2O [0.1 % H3PO4] - CH3CN, 95% - 5%, 5% - 95%, over 16 minutes, 2 ml/min flow rate) RT = 7.371 min; focus = 215 nm; 99.3% pure.

EXAMPLE 3

4-Benzyl-2-cyano-1-phenylpiperazine (4).

A solution of 3 (5.07 g, 17.0 mmol) and
diisopropylethylamine (4.97 g, 38.4 mmol) in DMF (40 mL) was treated with a solution of 2-cyanoacrylonitrile (2.30 g, 26.3 mmol) in DMF (40 mL) at room temperature (14 d). The solvent was removed in vacuo and the residue dissolved in dichloromethane and washed with water, brine, and dried (Na2SO4). Concentrated in vacuo, the residue was recrystallized from ethanol to afford 4 as white crystals.
1H NMR (CDCl3, 400 MHz) δ 7.34 (m, 7H), 7.00 (t, 3H, J = 8.31 Hz), 4.53 (s, 1H), 3.72 (d, 1H, J = 13.26 Hz), 3.59 (d, 1H, 13.43 Hz), 3.40 (d, 1H, J = 11.91 Hz), 3.28 (td, 1H, J = 3.13, 11.59 Hz), 3.13 (dt, 1H, J = 2.26, 11.42 Hz), 3.01 (dq, 1H, J = 2.43, 11.08 Hz), 2.53 (dd, 1H, J = 3.19, 11.41 Hz), 2.39 (td, 1H, J = 3.36, 11.25 Hz).
FABLRMS m/e 278 g/mole (M++H, C18H20N3 = 278 g/mole.)
HPLC (Vydac; C18; diameter = 4.6 mm; length = 150 mm; gradient = H2O [0.1 % H3PO4] - CH3CN, 95% - 5%, 5% - 95%, over 16 minutes, 2 ml/min flow rate) RT = 7.936 min; focus = 215 nm; 100% pure.
Anal. Calcd for C18H19N3 • 0.15 H2O: C = 77.19, H = 6.95, N = 15.00. Found: C = 77.14, H = 6.90, N = 14.88.

EXAMPLE 4

2-Cyano-1-phenylpiperazine (5).

A solution of 4 (3.40 g, 12.25 mmol) in 1 ,2-dichloroethane (60 mL) was treated with alpha-chloroethylchloroformate (3.78 g, 26.44 mmol) at 0°C. The reaction mixture was heated to 100°C (8 h). The solvent was removed in vacuo and the residue dissolved in methanol (80 mL) at room temperature (overnight). The solvent was removed in vacuo and the residue was recrystallized from ethanol (160 mL) to afford crystalline 5.
1H NMR (DMSO, 400 MHz) δ 9.74 (s, 1H), 7.36 (m, 2H), 7.12 (d, 2H, J = 7.89 Hz), 7.03 (t, 1H, J = 7.31 Hz), 5.48 (d, 1H, J = 4.03 Hz), 3.75 (d, 2H, J = 13.09 Hz), 3.43 (dd, 1H, J = 4.53, 13.43 Hz), 3.38 (d, 2H, J = 10.74 Hz), 3.07 (m, 2H).
FABLRMS m/e 188 g/mole (M++H, C11H14N3 = 188 g/mole.)
HPLC (Vydac; C18; diameter = 4.6 mm; length = 150 mm; gradient = H2O [0.1 % H3PO4] - CH3CN, 95% - 5%, 5% - 95%, over 16 minutes, 2 ml/min flow rate) RT = 3.563 min; focus = 215 nm; 100% pure.
Anal. Calcd for C11H13N3 • 1.00 HCl: C = 59.06, H = 6.31 , N = 18.79. Found: C = 59.27, H = 6.37, N = 18.42.

EXAMPLE 5

1 -phenyl-4-(butylsaccharin)-piperazine-2-carbonitrile (6)

A solution of 5 (122 mg, 0.545 mmol) and
diisopropylethylamine ( 170 g, 1.32 mmol) in DMF (1 mL) was treated with 4-bromobutylsaccharin (210 mg, 0.659 mmol) at room
temperature (3 d). The solvent was removed in vacuo. PCTLC (SiO2, 4mm, 10% EtOH; 90% CH2Cl2) afforded 6 as the hydrochloride salt after treatment with methanolic HCl.
1H NMR (DMSO, 400 MHz) δ 10.15 (s, 1H), 8.34 (d, 1H, J = 7.38 Hz), 8.13 (d, 1H, J = 7.56 Hz), 8.05 (m, 2H), 7.36 (t, 2H, J = 7.81 Hz), 7.12 (d, 2H, J = 8.23 Hz), 7.02 (t, 1H, J = 6.71 Hz), 3.85 (m, 4H), 3.57 (m, 2H), 3.15 (m, 4H).
FABLRMS m/e 425 g/mole (M++H, C22H25N4O3S = 425 g/mole.)
HPLC (Vydac; C18; diameter = 4.6 mm; length = 150 mm; gradient = H2O [0.1 % H3PO4] - CH3CN, 95% - 5%, 5% - 95%, over 16 minutes, 2 ml/min flow rate) RT = 7.915 min; focus = 215 nm; 100% pure.

EXAMPLE 6

N-[3-(3-cyano-4-phenylpiperazin-1 -yl)-propyl]-di-p-tolylacetamide(8)

A solution of 5 (152 mg, 0.679 mmol) and 7 (271 mg, 0.752 mmol) in DMF (1 mL) was treated with diisopropylethylamine ( 170 mg, 1.32 mmol) at room temperature (3 d). The solvent was removed in vacuo. PCTLC (SiO2, 4mm, 10% Et2O; 90% CH2Cl2) afforded 8 as the hydrochloride salt after treatment with methanolic HCl.
1H NMR (DMSO, 400 MHz) δ 10.10 (s, 1H), 7.36 (t, 2H, J = 7.64 Hz), 7.18 (d, 4H, J = 8.05 Hz), 7.11 (d, 6H, J = 7.89 Hz), 7.02 (t, 1H, J = 6.38 Hz), 5.59 (s,1H), 4.85 (s, 1H), 3.69 (m, 5H), 3.13 (m, 5H), 2.26 (s, 6H), 1.83 (s, 2H).
FABLRMS m/e 467 g/mole (M++H, C30H35N4O = 467 g/mole.)
HPLC (Vydac; C18; diameter = 4.6 mm; length = 150 mm; gradient = H2O [0.1 % TFA] - CH3CN [0.1 % TFA], 95% - 5%, 5% -95%, over 20 minutes, 1.5 ml/min flow rate) RT = 10.116 min; focus = 215 nm; 97.8% pure.
Anal. Calcd for C30H34N4O • 1.15 HCl and 0.05 H2O: C = 70.72, H = 6.97, N = 11.00. Found: C = 70.72, H = 6.99, N = 10.96.

EXAMPLE 7

Enantiomers of 4 (4a and 4b).

The enantiomeric mixture was separated utilizing normal phase chiral HPLC (Chiralcel OD, 2.0 cm × 25 cm, 65 hexanes/35 2-propanol/0.2 diethyl amine, 2.5 mL/min). Each enantiomer possessed identical spectroscopic properties but opposite signs of optical rotation. Chiral purity was assessed utilizing similar HPLC conditions (Chiralcel OD, 4.6 mm × 25 cm, 65 hexanes/35 2-propanol/0.2 diethyl amine, 0.7 mL/min).

EXAMPLE 8

Enantiomers of 5 (5a and 5b).

The enantiomeric mixture was separated utilizing normal phase chiral HPLC (Chiralcel OD, 2.0 cm × 25 cm, 65 hexanes/35 2-propanol/0.2 diethyl amine, 2.5 mL/min). Each enantiomer possessed identical spectroscopic properties but opposite signs of optical rotation. Chiral purity was assessed utilizing similar HPLC conditions (Chiralcel OD, 4.6 mm × 25 cm, 65 hexanes/35 2-propanol/0.2 diethyl amine, 0.7 mL/min).

EXAMPLE 9

1 ,1 -Dioxido-2-(4-bromobutyl)-1 ,2-benzisothiazol-3(2H)-one

The general procedure of J. D. Commerford and H. B. Donahue J. Org. Chem. 1956, 21 , 583-4 was modified: A mixture of 6 g of sodium saccharin, 100 mL of 1 ,4-dibromobutane, and 5 mL of N,N-dimethylformamide was heated at 50°C overnight. After cooling to ambient temperature, the mixture was diluted with 250 mL of ether and 50 mL of water. The aqueous layer was extracted with two additional 50 mL portions of ether and the combined organic extracts were dried over MgSO4 and concentrated under reduced pressure. The excess 1 ,4-dibromobutane was removed by short path vacuum distillation and the oily residue purified by crystallization from ether-hexane, mp 71 -2°C.

EXAMPLE 10

1,1 -Dioxido-2-(4-bromobutyl)-5-chloro- 1 ,2-benzisothiazol-3(2H)-one The general procedure of J. D. Commerford and H. B. Donahue J. Org. Chem. 1956, 21 , 583-4 was modified: A mixture of 0.5 g of 5-chloro-1 ,2-benzothiazol-3(2H)-one prepared as described by J. G. Lombardino, J. Org. Chem. 1971 , 36, 1843-5, 1 mL of N,N-dimethylformamide and 0.1 g of sodium hydride 60% oil dispersion was stirred at ambient temperature for 15 min, and 1.4 mL of 1 ,4-dibromobutane was added. After stirring at ambient temperature overnight, the mixture was diluted with 25 mL of ethyl acetate, washed with 25 mL of sat'd
NaHCO3, 25 mL of sat'd brine and dried over MgSO4. Removal of solvents under reduced pressure and vacuum distillation gave a crude product as a viscous oil which was free of 1 ,4-dibromobutane by 1H-NMR and was used without further purification.

EXAMPLE 11

As a specific embodiment of an oral composition, 100 mg of the compound of Example 5 is formulated with sufficient finely divided lactose to provide a total amount of 580 to 590 mg to fill a size O hard gel capsule.

EXAMPLE 12

Screening assay: Alpha 1a Adrenergic Receptor Binding
Membranes prepared from the stably transfected human alpha la cell line (ATCC CRL 11140) were used to identify compounds that bind to the human alpha 1a adrenergic receptor. These competition binding reactions (total volume = 200 μl) contained 50 mM Tris-HCl pH. 7.4, 5 mM EDTA, 150 mM NaCl, 100 pM [125 I]-HEAT, membranes prepared from the alpha 1 a cell line and increasing amounts of unlabeled ligand. Reactions were incubated at room temperature for one hour with shaking. Reactions were filtered onto Whatman GF/C glass fiber filters with a Inotec 96 well cell harvester. Filters were washed three times with ice cold buffer and bound radioactivity was determined (Ki). Representative compounds of the present invention were found to have Ki values ≤ 300 nM.

EXAMPLE 13

Selective Binding assays
Membranes prepared from stably transfected human alpha Id and alpha lb cell lines (ATCC CRL 11138 and CRL 11139, respectively) were used to identify compounds that selectively bind to the human alpha la adrenergic receptor. These competition binding reactions (total volume = 200 μl) contained 50 mM Tris-HCl pH. 7.4, 5 mM EDTA, 150 mM NaCl, 100 pM [ 125 I]-HEAT, membranes prepared from cell lines transfected with the respective alpha 1 subtype expression plasmid and increasing amounts of unlabeled ligand.
Reactions were incubated at room temperature for one hour with shaking. Reactions were filtered onto Whatman GF/C glass fiber filters with a Inotec 96 well cell harvester. Filters were washed three times with ice cold buffer and bound radioactivity was determined (Ki).

EXAMPLE 14

EXEMPLARY COUNTERSCREENS

1. Assay Title: Dopamine D2, D3, D4 in vitro screen

Objective of the Assay:
The objective of this assay is to eliminate agents which specifically affect binding of [3H] spiperone to cells expressing human dopamine receptors D2, D3 or D4.

Method:
Modified from VanTol et al (1991 ); Nature (Vol 350) Pg 610-613.
Frozen pellets containing specific dopamine receptor subtypes stably expressed in clonal cell lines are lysed in 2 ml lysing buffer (10mM Tris-HCl/5mM Mg, pH 7.4). Pellets obtained after centrifuging these membranes (15' at 24,450 rpm) are resuspended in 50mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4 containing EDTA, MgCl[2], KCl, NaCl, CaCl[2] and ascorbate to give a 1 Mg/mL suspension. The assay is initiated by adding 50-75 μg membranes in a total volume of 500 μl containing 0.2 nM [3H]-spiperone. Non-specific binding is defined using 10 μM apomorphine. The assay is terminated after a 2 hour incubation at room temperature by rapid filtration over GF/B filters presoaked in 0.3% PEI, using 50mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4.

2. Assay Title: Serotonin 5HT1a

Objective of the Assay
The objective of this assay is to eliminate agents which specifically affect binding to cloned human 5HT1 a receptor

Method:
Modified from Schelegel and Peroutka Biochemical
Pharmacology 35: 1943-1949 (1986).
Mammalian cells expressing cloned human 5HT1a receptors are lysed in ice-cold 5 mM Tris-HCl , 2 mM EDTA (pH 7.4) and homogenized with a polytron homogenizer. The homogenate is centrifuged at 1000Xg for 30', and then the supernatant is centrifuged again at 38,000Xg for 30'. The binding assay contains 0.25 nM [3H]8-OH-DPAT (8-hydroxy-2-dipropylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene) in 50 mM Tris-HCl, 4 mM CaCl2 and 1 mg/ml ascorbate. Non-specific binding is defined using 10 μM propranolol. The assay is terminated after a 1 hour incubation at room temperature by rapid filtration over GF/Cfilters

EXAMPLE 15

EXEMPLARY FUNCTIONAL ASSAYS In order to confirm the specificity of compounds for the human alpha la adrenergic receptor and to define the biological activity of the compounds, the following functional tests may be performed:

1. In vitro Rat, Dog and Human Prostate and Dog Urethra
Taconic Farms Sprague-Dawley male rats, weighing 250-400 grams are sacrificed by cervical dislocation under anesthesia (methohexital; 50 mg/kg, i.p.). An incision is made into the lower abdomen to remove the ventral lobes of the prostate. Each prostate removed from a mongrel dog is cut into 6-8 pieces longitudinally along the urethra opening and stored in ice-cold oxygenated Krebs solution overnight before use if necessary. Dog urethra proximal to prostate is cut into approximately 5 mm rings, the rings are then cut open for contractile measurement of circular muscles. Human prostate chips from transurethral surgery of benign prostate hyperplasia are also stored overnight in ice-cold Krebs solution if needed.
The tissue is placed in a Petri dish containing oxygenated Krebs solution [NaCl, 118 mM; KCl, 4.7 mM; CaCl2, 2.5 mM;
KH2PO4, 1.2 mM; MgSO4, 1.2 mM; NaHCO3, 2.0 mM; dextrose, 11 mM] warmed to 37°C. Excess lipid material and connective tissue are carefully removed. Tissue segments are attached to glass tissue holders with 4-0 surgical silk and placed in a 5 ml jacketed tissue bath
containing Krebs buffer at 37°C, bubbled with 5% CO2/95% O2. The tissues are connected to a Statham-Gould force transducer; 1 gram (rat, human) or 1.5 gram (dog) of tension is applied and the tissues are allowed to equilibrate for one hour. Contractions are recorded on a Hewlett-Packard 7700 series strip chart recorder.
After a single priming dose of 3 μM (for rat), 10 μM (for dog) and 20 μM (for human) of phenylephrine, a cumulative
concentration response curve to an agonist is generated; the tissues are washed every 10 minutes for one hour. Vehicle or antagonist is added to the bath and allowed to incubate for one hour, then another cumulative concentration response curve to the agonist is generated.

EC50 values are calculated for each group using GraphPad Inplot software. pA2 (-log Kb) values were obtained from Schild plot when three or more concentrations were tested. When less than three concentrations of antagonist are tested, Kb values are calculated according to the following formula


where x is the ratio of EC50 of agonist in the presence and absence of antagonist and [B] is the antagonist concentration.

2. Measurement of Intra-Urethral Pressure in Anesthetized Dogs

PURPOSE: Benign prostatic hyperplasia causes a decreased urine flow rate that may be produced by both passive physical obstruction of the prostatic urethra from increased prostate mass as well as active obstruction due to prostatic contraction. Alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists such as prazosin and terazosin prevent active prostatic contraction, thus improve urine flow rate and provide symptomatic relief in man. However, these are non-selective alpha 1 receptor antagonists which also have pronounced vascular effects. Because we have identified the alpha 1 a receptor subtype as the predominent subtype in the human prostate, it is now possible to specifically target this receptor to inhibit prostatic contraction without concomitant changes in the vasculature. The following model is used to measure adrenergically mediated changes in intra-urethral pressure and arterial pressure in anesthetized dogs in order to evaluate the efficacy and potency of selective alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists. The goals are to: 1) identify the alpha 1 receptor subtypes responsible for prostatic/urethral contraction and vascular responses, and 2) use this model to evaluate novel selective alpha adrenergic antagonists. Novel and standard alpha adrenergic antagonists may be evaluated in this manner.

METHODS: Male mongrel dogs (7-12 kg) are used in this study.

The dogs are anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (35 mg/kg, i.v. plus 4 mg/kg/hr iv infusion). An endotracheal tube is inserted and the animal ventilated with room air using a Harvard instruments positive displacement large animal ventilator. Catheters (PE 240 or 260) are placed in the aorta via the femoral artery and vena cava via the femoral veins (2 catheters, one in each vein) for the measurement of arterial pressure and the administration of drugs, respectively. A supra-pubic incision ~1/2 inch lateral to the penis is made to expose the urethers, bladder and urethra. The urethers are ligated and cannulated so that urine flows freely into beakers. The dome of the bladder is retracted to facilitate dissection of the proximal and distal urethra. Umbilical tape is passed beneath the urethra at the bladder neck and another piece of umbilical tape is placed under the distal urethra approximately 1-2 cm distal to the prostate. The bladder is incised and a Millar micro-tip pressure transducer is advanced into the urethra. The bladder incision is sutured with 2-0 or 3-0 silk (purse-string suture) to hold the transducer. The tip of the transducer is placed in the prostatic urethra and the position of the Millar catheter is verified by gently squeezing the prostate and noting the large change in urethral pressure.
Phenylephrine, an alpha 1 adrenergic agonist, is
administered (0.1 -100 ug/kg, iv; 0.05 ml/kg volume) in order to construct dose response curves for changes in intra-urethral and arterial pressure. Following administration of increasing doses of an alpha adrenergic antagonist (or vehicle), the effects of phenylephrine on arterial pressure and intra-urethral pressure are re-evaluated. Four or five phenylephrine dose-response curves are generated in each animal (one control, three or four doses of antagonist or vehicle). The relative antagonist potency on phenylephrine induced changes in arterial and intra-urethral pressure are determined by Schild analysis. The family of averaged curves are fit simultaneously (using ALLFIT software package) with a four paramenter logistic equation constraining the slope, minimum response, and maximum response to be constant among curves. The dose ratios for the antagonist doses (rightward shift in the dose-response curves from control) are calculated as the ratio of the ED50's for the respective curves. These dose-ratios are then used to construct a Schild plot and the Kb (expressed as ug/kg, iv) determined.

The Kb (dose of antagonist causing a 2-fold rightward shift of the phenylephrine dose-response curve) is used to compare the relative potency of the antagonists on inhibiting phenylephrine responses for intra-urethral and arterial pressure. The relative selectivity is calculated as the ratio of arterial pressure and intra-urethral pressure Kb's. Effects of the alpha 1 antagonists on baseline arterial pressure are also monitored. Comparison of the relative antagonist potency on changes in arterial pressure and intra-urethral pressure provide insight as to whether the alpha receptor subtype responsible for increasing intra-urethral pressure is also present in the systemic vasculature.
According to this method, one is able to confirm the selectivity of alpha 1 a adrenergic receptor antagonists that prevent the increase in intra-urethral pressure to phenylephrine without any activity at the
vasculature.

While the foregoing specification teaches the principles of the present invention, with examples provided for the purpose of illustration, it will be understood that the practice of the invention encompasses all of the usual variations, adaptations and/or modifications as come within the scope of the following claims and their equivalents.