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1. WO2020112691 - PETITE ENCEINTE HABITABLE DÉMONTABLE

Note: Texte fondé sur des processus automatiques de reconnaissance optique de caractères. Seule la version PDF a une valeur juridique

[ EN ]

DE-CONSTRUCTIBLE SMALL INHABITABLE ENCLOSURE

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Serial No.

62/771 ,298, filed on November 26, 2018. The entire disclosure of the above application is hereby incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD

[0002] The present disclosure relates to mobile homes. In particular, but not intended to limit the disclosure, the present disclosure relates to a waterproof, easily constructible and collapsible/de- constructible, small mobile enclosure that may be utilized as a residence.

BACKGROUND

[0003] Mobile, or“tiny” homes reduce the size of a home from the traditional thousands of square feet of living space, to, for example, hundreds of square feet. This reduction is size reduces the cost of materials and labor costs associated with the construction of tiny homes as compared to traditionally-built homes.

[0004] Although the use of mobile, or“tiny” homes create many advantages for the user of such enclosures, the current design of many tiny homes are rife with deficiencies. For example, many tiny homes are extremely expensive for the square footage provided. More inexpensive tiny homes include deficiencies in the structure of the enclosure, such as, but not limited to, allowing liquid to enter the interior of the enclosure. Or, such inexpensive structures may not comprise the structural rigidity of more expensive tiny home options.

[0005] Tiny homes may also provide insufficient protection from external elements related to many normal weather patterns, creating inhospitable internal environments. This leads to the inability to deploy tiny homes in certain geographic locations. These deficiencies and others may lead to safety concerns, which may also be related to low-quality design and/or materials of construction. All these problems prohibit tiny homes from emerging as a realistic alternative to traditional homes and/or serving as temporary and emergency housing.

[0006] There is a continuing need for a de-constructible enclosure that can be used for emergency situations, and which is simple to both construct and to de-construct for storage and transport to other locations. Desirably, the enclosure may also be used as a tiny home, and modular and able to be attached to other like enclosures to construct buildings and homes of various sizes.

SUMMARY

[0007] In concordance with the instant disclosure, a de-constructible enclosure that can be used for emergency situations, and which is simple to both construct and to de-construct for storage and transport to other locations, and which may also be used as a tiny home, and is modular and able to be attached to other like enclosures to construct buildings and homes of various sizes, has surprisingly been discovered.

[0008] To solve these problems and to also create the ability to quickly construct and deconstruct inexpensive tiny homes and create a form factor that enables safely and securely moving the deconstructed home to a new location, a new tiny home has been created that enables ease of use in rapid expansion of a homeless population and/or emergency response housing post-natural disaster in affected areas providing shelter for affected individuals. The new tiny home may be characterized by a“panel and post” construction as described further herein.

[0009] The present disclosure incorporates superior structural rigidity, weatherproofing, and solar insulation into a tiny home’s design. The outcome of such improvements produces a superior, inexpensive tiny home that can withstand elemental forces. Additionally, the current disclosure facilitates ease in construction such that the tiny home may be employed quickly in response to emergencies. Moreover, the enclosure of the current disclosure may be deconstructed and moved to another location in a short timeframe thus allowing for truly mobile applications of such structures.

[0010] Various embodiments of the disclosure may be characterized as an enclosure. The enclosure may comprise a plurality of sides. The plurality of sides may be a front side, an opposing side, a first adjacent side, and a second adjacent side. The enclosure may further comprise a roof. The roof may comprise (i) a first angled side which may be coupled with the front side at a front eave, a second angled side which may be coupled to the opposing side at an opposing eave, (ii) a first flat side, which may be coupled to the top edge of the first adjacent side, and (iii) a second flat side, which may be coupled to the top edge of the second adjacent side.

[0011] The enclosure may further comprise a structural frame. The structural frame may comprise a plurality of vertical frame members, a plurality of horizontal frame members, a plurality of angled ridge members, and a horizontal ridge member.

[0012] The structure may further comprise a base. The base may comprise a plurality of longitudinal base members which may comprise a plurality of exterior longitudinal and interior longitudinal base members. The base may further comprise a plurality of latitudinal base members which may comprise a plurality of exterior latitudinal and interior latitudinal base members. The exterior longitudinal base members, the interior longitudinal base members, the exterior latitudinal base members, and the interior latitudinal base members of the base may be coupled in a substantially perpendicular pattern at intersection points. The base may further comprise a plurality of base supports, which may be positioned at the intersection points. The base may further comprise a base floor which may be coupled to the plurality of longitudinal base members and the plurality of latitudinal base members.

[0013] Further embodiments of the disclosure may be characterized as a method for weatherproofing an enclosure. The steps may comprise connecting side panels, also referred to herein as panels, of an enclosure with panel connectors and caulking the joints of the panel connectors, weather-taping the joints of the connected panels, applying an elastomeric coating to the joints of the connected panels, caulking the joints of the connected panels, and applying a heat-resistant coating to the exterior of the enclosure.

[0014] In one embodiment, A de-constructible enclosure has a structural frame with a post, a first panel with a first end, and a second panel with a second end. The post has a substantially H-shaped cross-section including a first recess on a first side of the post and a second recess on a second side of the post. The first recess of the post receives the first end of the first panel. The second recess of the post receives the second end of the second panel. The post, the first panel, and the second panel together define a wall of the enclosure.

[0015] The structural frame may have four vertical members including a first vertical member and a second vertical member. The post is vertically oriented and disposed between the first vertical member and the second vertical member. The structural frame may further have a base with four exterior latitudinal members that are arranged in quadrilateral shape defining four corners of the base. Each of the four vertical members may be attached to one of the four corners of the base. The structural frame further has a roof, with each of the post and the four vertical members being disposed between and connecting the base with the roof.

[0016] It should be appreciated that the receiving of the first end of the first panel in the first recess of the post defines a first joint. Likewise, the receiving of the second end of the second panel in the second recess of the post defines a second joint. Caulking may be disposed at each of the first joint and the second joint. There may also be is an elastomeric coating disposed over each of the first joint and the second joint and the caulking. The wall of the enclosure is thereby sealed against the elements and made water impermeable. The elastomeric coating may be one of a silicone-based coating and an acrylic-based coating. In some examples, there may also be a weatherproof tape disposed at each of the first joint and the second joint between the caulking and the elastomeric coating.

[0017] The post itself may be formed from one of aluminum, PVC, and rubber, as non limiting examples. In particular, the post is formed from aluminum and this has been found especially advantageous due to the corrosion resistance of the aluminum. In particular, structural grade aluminum (T-6 aluminum #6061 ) has been especially useful for the posts. The first panel and the second panel may be formed from plywood sheets. Additionally, it is contemplated that the first panel and the second panel may be covered on both sides by at least one of a High Pressure Laminate (HPL) skin and a Fiberglass Reinforced Panels (FRP) skin. At least a portion of an exterior of the wall of the enclosure, and in certain cases an entirety of an exterior of the enclosure, may also be covered with a heat-reflective coating.

[0018] In a further embodiment, a method for manufacturing the may first include the steps of providing a post having a substantially H-shaped cross-section including a first recess on a first side of the post and a second recess on a second side of the post, and providing a first panel with a first end, and a second panel with a second end. The method further includes steps of receiving the first end of the first panel in the first recess of the post, and receiving the second end of the second panel in the second recess of the post. In this manner of assembly, the post, the first panel, and the second panel together define a wall of the enclosure.

[0019] The receiving of the first end of the first panel in the first recess of the post may define a first joint, and the receiving of the second end of the second panel in the second recess of the post may define a second joint. The method may further include a step of caulking

the first joint and the second joint. The method may also include a step applying an elastomeric coating to the first joint and the second joint. The method may furthermore include a step of weather-taping the first joint and the second joint of the connected panels. The method may additionally include a step of applying a heat-reflective coating to an exterior of the wall of the enclosure.

[0020] In a particular embodiment, the enclosure may be characterized as a“panel and post” construction system. The basic unit may be provided in the form of a 10’ x 12’ basic DIY home kit. These basic units can be combined together, on either the 10 foot or the 12- foot side, in order to make a larger structure of any desired size. The basic units can also be combined vertically to go up two or three stories, or more. In another example, four of the 10’ x 12’ basic units may be bolted together on a bottom floor to provide the larger structure.

[0021] The“panel and post construction” can use panels made out of different combinations of material. For instance, standard ¾” inch plywood sheets may be employed as the panels and sealed with waterproof and heat reflective coatings in order to keep the plywood waterproof and compliant with applicant “Cool Roof” building codes in the region of constructions. In another example, three-quarter inch (¾”) plywood sheets (treated with a termicide) may be used and then covered on both sides with a High-Pressure Laminate (HPL) skin that keeps out moisture and mold. The use of hybrids such as Fiberglass Reinforced Panels (FRP) as the skin on both sides of the plywood sheets is also contemplated. A thicker panel with an insulating foam sandwiched between two sheets of plywood covered by either FRP or HPL skin may also be used. Other suitable materials for the panels may include ceramics, steel, or Kevlar® plastic, as particular non-limiting examples.

[0022] These basic units can be set up or broken down in just a few days by two people without extensive training. The structural material may be warranted to be 100% waterproof, rustproof, termite proof, mold-proof when installed as instructed. The basic unit can also be used with other attachments configured to attach to the basic unit structure. Such attachments can include, as non-limiting examples, dormers, rigid awnings made out of simila or same materials, porches, walkways, balconies and the like.

[0023] Where the plurality of basic units is employed to form a three-story structure, exterior stairways may be employed that that bolt thru, or otherwise connect with, the exterior frame of the three-story model for multiple walk up apartments. The stairways may be made from aluminum tubes, brackets and stainless bolts and HPL panels as the main structure, for example. They are bolted into the cement slab surrounding the unit and act as a structural support which stiffens the entire structure.

DRAWINGS

[0024] The above, as well as other advantages of the present disclosure, will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description, particularly when considered in the light of the drawings described hereafter.

[0025] FIGS.1 A, 1 B, and 1 C illustrate a front elevational view, a side elevational view, and a rear elevational view, respectively, of an enclosure or tiny house in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0026] FIG. 2A illustrates exemplary paneling connection design of the sides and roof of the enclosure or tiny house in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0027] FIG. 2B illustrates a perspective view of an end of an exemplary H-style connector post or apparatus in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0028] FIG. 2C illustrates a cross-sectional top plan view of the H-style connector post or apparatus with panels in process of being inserted therein;

[0029] FIG. 2D illustrates a cross-sectional top plan view of the H-style connector post or apparatus with the panels having been inserted therein;

[0030] FIG. 2E illustrates a cross-sectional top plan view the H-style connector post or apparatus with the panels having been inserted therein, and with additional caulking and a polymeric caulking applied to seal the post and panel construction;

[0031] FIG. 3 illustrates and exemplary eve design of a roof of a tiny house in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0032] FIG. 4 illustrates an exemplary ridge design of a roof of a tiny house in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0033] FIG. 5 illustrates and exemplary structural frame design of a tiny house in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0034] FIG. 6 illustrates an exemplary four-point connection joint apparatus in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0035] FIG 7 illustrates an exemplary bracket apparatus in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0036] FIGS. 8A and 8B illustrate an exemplary base design of a tiny house in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0037] FIG. 9 illustrates an exemplary exterior coating application of a tiny house in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0038] FIG. 10 illustrates an exemplary base construction of a tiny house in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0039] FIG. 11 illustrates an exemplary paneling construction of a flat side of a roof of a tiny house in accordance with embodiments described herein;

[0040] FIG. 12 illustrates an exemplary attic-type structure of a tiny house in accordance with embodiments described herein; and

[0041] FIG. 13 illustrates an exemplary multi-story tiny house formed by connecting at least two of the enclosures in accordance with embodiments described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0042] The following detailed description and appended drawings describe and illustrate various embodiments of the invention. The description and drawings serve to enable one skilled in the art to make and use the invention and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention in any manner.

[0043] The words“for example” is used herein to mean“serving as an example, instance, or illustration.” Any embodiment described herein as“for example” is not necessarily to be construed as preferred or advantageous over other embodiments.

[0044] As described further herein, a de-constructible small inhabitable enclosure 100 or “tiny house” of the present disclosure may include a plurality of sides including a front side, an opposing rear side, a first adjacent side, and a second adjacent side, a roof, a structural frame, and a base. The roof may have a first angled side, a second angled side, a first flat side, and a second flat side. The structural frame may have a plurality of vertical members, horizontal members, angled ridge members, and horizontal ridge members. The base may have a plurality of longitudinal and latitudinal members, both interior and exterior, base supports, and a base floor. The enclosure 100 may also be weatherproofed by the steps of utilizing panel connectors, caulking joints of the panel connectors, coating, weather taping, and caulking of paneling joints, and applying a heat-resistant coating. Through the unique features of enclosure 100, quick deployment of the structure as an emergency response enclosure is available.

[0045] Advantageously, the enclosure 100 is both quickly deployable and also rapidly de- constructible so that it may be removed or transported to another location as needed. Although described primarily herein with respect to the emergency response, it should also be understood that the enclosure 100 may also be adapted for housing in non-emergency settings. For example, the enclosure 100 is also modularized so that a plurality of the enclosure 100 may be coupled together, both horizontally and vertically, so as to form larger building structures. Such larger building structures, including multi-story structures, formed from the plurality of the enclosure 100 are contemplated and considered to be within the scope of the present disclosure.

[0046] FIGA. 1A, 1 B, and 1 C illustrate elevational views of the enclosure 100 that shows various sides of the enclosure 100 upon completion. The enclosure 100 may have various sides including a front side 111 , an opposing rear side 113, a first adjacent side 112, and a second adjacent side 114. More or fewer sides may be present in different orientations of enclosure 100. For example, in a hexagonal orientation, the enclosure 100 may comprise six sides. The elevational view 101 depicts the front side 111 of enclosure 100. The front side 111 may be regarded as the entry side of enclosure 100. The front side 111 of enclosure 100 may include two doors to enter the enclosure 100 but may include more or less than two doors. In some embodiments, the front side 111 of the enclosure 100 may include windows or other apertures. The elevational view of the enclosure 100 further depicts opposing rear side 113 of the enclosure 100. The opposing rear side 113 may be regarded as the back of enclosure 100 and is oriented substantially opposite the front side 111 of the enclosure 100.

[0047] The opposing side 113 of the enclosure 100 may include two windows. Such windows and doors may be configured to be opened and closed such that air flow may permeate through the enclosure 100 when the windows and/or doors are in the open configuration. The opposing side 113 may include more than two windows or less than two windows. In some embodiments, the opposing side 113 may include other apertures. The enclosure 100 may have adjacent sides being the first adjacent side 112 and the second adjacent side 114. The adjacent sides may be regarded as the longitudinal sides of the

enclosure 100, which are oriented adjacent the front side 111 and the opposing rear side

113 of enclosure 100, and may include a common vertex with each of, or at least one of, the front side 111 and the opposing rear side 113, or another adjacent side. All sides may be substantially flat sides and each of the adjacent sides may be provided without windows, doors, or other apertures. However, windows and doors may be added to the adjacent sides in some embodiments.

[0048] The dimensions of the sides of the enclosure 100 may include all of the front side 111 , the opposing rear side 113, the first adjacent side 112, and the second adjacent side

114 having a vertical length of about eight feet (8’) from the base of the enclosure 100 to the top edge of the sides; however, the vertical length may be more than or less than this length in some embodiments. The front side 111 and the opposing rear side 113 of the enclosure 100 may have a horizontal length of twelve feet (12’), and the adjacent sides may have a horizontal length of ten feet (10’); however, horizontal lengths of the sides may be more than or less than these lengths in some embodiments.

[0049] The utilization of windows and doors in the sides of the enclosure 100 facilitates air movement through the structure of the enclosure 100. This allows for placement of the enclosure 100 in environments where ambient air conditions are hospitable to human inhabitation. Additionally, the use of such windows and doors and other apertures in the enclosure 100 may enable outfitting of the structure with an air conditioning and/or heating unit.

[0050] The sides of the enclosure 100 may be constructed of a variety of materials including panels 201 , 202, 203 and posts 210, 211 , for example, as shown in FIGS. 2A-2D. The panels 201 , 202, 203 may be formed from plywood, for example, such as three-quarters inch (3/4”) thick plywood sheets or panels. Additional or alternative panel materials such as drywall, metal, sheetrock, composites, or other suitable weather-resistant materials may be combined with, or separate from, the plywood. Layers of one or more materials may be used for the panels 201 , 202, 203.

[0051] Advantageously, the sides may be constructed in a“post and panel” assembly by the joining of multiple pieces of plywood panels 201 , 202, 203 together with the posts 210, 211. In a most particular example, the posts 210, 211 are H-style panel connectors as illustrated in FIG 2B. The H-style connectors are posts 210, 211 having an H-shaped cross-section with a first recess on a first side of the post 210, 211 and a second recess on a second side of the post 210, 211. The recesses are configured to receive ends of the panels 201 , 202, 203. These H-style panel connectors or posts 210, 211 may be formed from aluminum, polymeric material (such as PVC), other corrosion-resistant metals, elastomeric materials such as, but not limited to, rubber, or any other suitable corrosion-resistant materials.

[0052] In some embodiments, three equivalent length and width panels, being the first panel 201 , the second panel 202, and the third panel 203 shown in FIG. 2A may be joined by two posts 210, 211 in the form of the H-style panel connectors, being the first H-style panel connector post 210, and the second H-style panel connector post 211 , at the shared edges of second panel 202 with first panel 201 and third panel 203. Placing an end of one side panel 201 within a first channel of the H-style panel connector post 210 and an end of an adjoining side panel 202 in the opposing second channel of the H-style panel connection post 210, for example, as shown in FIGS. 2C and 2D, advantageously prevents or militates against leakage of air/gas and/or liquid into enclosure 100 upon assembly. Other suitable types of the connector posts 210, 211 may additionally, or alternatively, be utilized within the scope of the disclosure.

[0053] It should be appreciated that the use of multiple pieces of the precut plywood panels 201 , 202, 203 and the posts 210, 211 as panel connectors allows for quick and simple assembly of the sides of the enclosure 100. Correspondingly, the bill of materials for the sides of the enclosure 100 is minimal, and the materials are readily available, thereby lowering the capital costs associated with the construction of the enclosure 100.

[0054] FIG. 2B depicts an example of an H-style panel connector utilized as the posts 210, 211 in the sides of the enclosure 100. As seen and described with respect to FIGS. 3-8 further herein, the posts 210, 211 in the form of the H-style panel connectors may be coupled to a structural frame via nut-and-bolt combinations, screws, rivets, nails, or any other suitable coupling mechanisms. Such bolts may be 5/16-18” x ¾”, socket flat countersunk head caped, 316 stainless steel, full- threaded hexagonal Allen bolts, as non limiting examples. Other suitable types of coupling mechanisms may also be employed as desired.

[0055] FIGS. 1A, 1 B, and 1 C, in conjunction with FIG. 3 and FIG. 4, illustrates the roof of the enclosure 100, with FIG. 1 B illustrating a side view of enclosure 100, and FIG. 3 and FIG. 4 illustrating the orientation of the roof in relation to the side of the enclosure 100. As seen in FIG. 1 B, the roof of the enclosure 100 may comprise a first angled side 121 , a

second angled side 123, a first flat side 122, and a second flat side 124. However, in some embodiments, more or less sides may be used in differing orientations of the enclosure 100. The first angled side 121 of the roof may be regarded as substantially tetrahedral in orientation, as illustrated in FIG. 1 B, with a top surface, and bottom surface. Such top and bottom surfaces are illustrated in FIG. 3 as top surface 301 and bottom surface 302. The first angled side 121 may be oriented such that the bottom surface 302 of the first angled side 121 of the roof intersects a top edge 321 of the front side 111 of the enclosure 100, as illustrated in FIGS. 1A, 1 B, and 3. The intersection may be regarded as a front eve 341 , for example, as shown in FIG. 3. The front eve 341 of the first angled side 121 may overhang the front side 111 of enclosure 100 by nine inches (9”), as illustrated in FIG. 1 B. Other dimensions for the front eve 341 may also be selected within the scope of the present disclosure. In other embodiments, for example as shown in FIG. 3, there may not be an overhang.

[0056] The second angled side 123 of the roof may also be regarded as substantially tetrahedral in orientation as illustrated in FIG. 1 B, with a top surface, and bottom surface. Such top and bottom surfaces are illustrated in FIG. 3, which is a mirror image of the second angled side 123 shown in FIG. 1 B, as a top surface 311 and a bottom surface 312. The second angled side 123 of the roof may be oriented such that the bottom surface 311 of the second angled side 123 of the roof intersects the top edge 331 of opposing side 113 of enclosure 100, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 B, 1 C, and 3. The intersection may be regarded as an opposing eve 351. The opposing eve 351 of the second angled side 123 may overhang the front side of enclosure 100 by nine inches (9”), as illustrated in FIG. 1 B. In some embodiments, the eve overhangs of the first and second angled sides 121 , 123 may be more or less than nine inches (9”). Other dimensions for the opposing eve 351 may also be selected within the scope of the present disclosure.

[0057] It should be appreciated that the overhangs of the front and opposing eves 3431 , 351 serve to prevent or militate against elemental penetration into the windows and doors of the enclosure 100. Additionally, the first angled side 121 and the second angled side 123 may comprise apertures such as windows, portholes, or louvers to allow for air penetration into or out from the enclosure 100 and solar penetration into the enclosure 100.

[0058] The first flat side 122 of the roof may be regarded as substantially triangular in orientation with an interior surface and an exterior surface as illustrated in FIG. 1 B. The first flat side 122 of the roof may be oriented such that the bottom edge of the first flat side 122 of the roof intersects the top edge of the first adjacent side 112 of enclosure 100. The posts 210, 211 , for example, in the form of the H-style panel connectors, such as those illustrated in FIG. 2B, may be used at this intersection of the panels 201 , 202, 203, as well as any other panel 201 , 202, 203 intersection described and shown herein.

[0059] The second flat side 124 of the roof may be regarded as substantially triangular in orientation with an interior surface and an exterior surface. The second flat side 124 of the roof may be oriented such that the bottom edge of the second flat side 124 of the roof intersects the top edge of second adjacent side 114 of enclosure 100.

[0060] Referring now to FIG. 11 , an example of the paneling orientation of the first and second flat sides 122, 124 of the enclosure 100 is shown. The first flat side panel 1101 may be one of many panels 201 , 202, 203 that may comprise a flat side of the roof of the enclosure 100 and are coupled to one another via the coupling means as discussed previously herein. The substantially tetrahedral and triangular geometries of the roof sides may be of differing geometries based upon differing embodiments of the enclosure 100.

[0061] The first and second flat sides 122, 124 may either, or both, additionally comprise port hole(s) 125, for example, as shown in FIG. 1 B, that penetrate the exterior surface to the interior surface of the first and second flat sides 122, 124. Such port holes 125 may be configured to be opened and closed such that air flow may permeate the enclosure 100 when the port holes 125 are in the open configuration. Additionally, the port holes 125 serve to allow light into the enclosure 100 to heat the structure. In some embodiments, the port holes 125 may be louvers, windows, or other air-flow designed apertures penetrating the flat sides of the roof of enclosure 100. Other suitable sizes and shapes for the port holes 125 may also be employed as desired.

[0062] The first angled side 121 and the second angled side 122 may connect to each other at roof ridge 400 of enclosure 100, for example, as shown in FIG.4 that illustrates the roof ridge design of the enclosure 100. The connection of first angled side 421 and second angled side 423 of enclosure 100 may meet at a ninety-degree (90°) angle to form the roof ridge 400 of enclosure 100. Flowever, the angle may be more than or less than ninety degrees (90°) in some embodiments. FIG. 4 additionally illustrates the connection to the first angled side 421 and the second angled side 423 of enclosure 100 with the first flat side 422 and the second flat side 424 of enclosure 100. The top edges of the first flat side 422 and the second flat side 424 of the roof may couple to the bottom surfaces of the first angled side 421 and the second angled side 423 of the roof. The top edge geometries of the first flat side 422 and the second flat side 424 are complementary to the angle of connection between the first angled side 421 and second angled side 423, such that the roof encloses the structure 100.

[0063] The roof of the enclosure 100 may have a maximum vertical height of five feet four inches (5’ -4”) from the bottom edge of the first or second flat side 122, 124 to the top edge of the first and second angled sides 121 , 123, as illustrated in FIGS. 1A, 1 B, and 1 C. However, the vertical height may be greater or less than this amount in some embodiments. The roof in combination with the sides of the enclosure 100 yields an overall height extending from the ground to the top edge of the first and second angled sides 121 , 123 of about thirteen feet eight inches (13’-8”) in some embodiments and as illustrated in FIG. 1A, 1 B, and 1 C. This height facilitates the construction of the tiny house or enclosure 100 with the use of simple step-ladders and does not require the use of complex construction equipment, such as a personal lift or cranes, that some similar tiny homes require. This lowers the costs associated with the construction of the enclosure 100 and increases the simplicity in design of the enclosure 100.

[0064] The roof of the enclosure 100 may be constructed from a variety of materials including plywood sheets, similar to what is used for the panels 201 , 202, 203. Such plywood sheets may be a variety of thicknesses such as three-quarters inch (3/4”) in thickness as illustrated in FIG. 3. In some embodiments, other suitable materials, such as drywall, metal, wood, and/or composites may additionally or alternatively be utilized as the roof material. Layers of one or more materials may be used. Additionally, in some embodiments, thicknesses of more than three-quarters inch (3/4”) and less than three-quarters inch (3/4”) may be used as the roof material. The roof may be constructed as a single panel of plywood (or other suitable material) per side. Alternatively, the roof may be constructed by multiple panels, joined together either in a similar fashion to that of the sides of the enclosure 100 with the use of H-style panel connectors, or other suitable joining methods.

[0065] In one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 2A, three equivalent length and width panels, being the first panel 221 , the second panel 222, and the third panel 223, may be joined by two panel connectors, being a first panel connector 230, and a second panel connector 231 , at the shared edges of the second panel 222 with the first panel 221 and the third panel

223. This allows for flexibility in selecting the type of roof material, both in material of construction, and panel dimensions, which further lowers the cost of the enclosure 100 by eliminating the need to purchase custom roofing. In some embodiments, the roof may also be covered in a weatherproof coating 900, such as a spray-applied epoxide coating as a non-limiting example, which is further discussed in relation to weatherproofing below and illustrated in FIG. 9. Alternatively, the roof may be covered with tiling, shingling, or other suitable weatherproofing materials as selected to one skilled in the art.

[0066] FIG. 5 illustrates a structural frame 500 of the enclosure 100. The structural frame 500 supports the sides and roof of the enclosure 100 and is affixed to the base of enclosure 100. The frame may comprise 1 5”x1 5”x125” steel or aluminum tubing, as shown in FIG. 4; however, it should be appreciated that aluminum tubing may be preferred due to its anti corrosion characteristics. The frame 500 may comprise a plurality of members coupled to one another by nut-and-bolt combinations, screws, rivets, nails, or other suitable coupling mechanisms in combination with brackets to create a frame structure. Similar coupling mechanisms may be used to couple the posts 210, 211 in the form of H-style panel connectors to the panels 201 , 202, 203.

[0067] The corners of the frame 500 may be defined by a bracket as illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7. The brackets may include one-and-one-quarter inch (1-1/4”) zinc plated corner braces, for example. Other suitable types of brackets for defining the corners of the frame 500 may also be used within the scope of the disclosure.

[0068] Returning now to FIG. 5, the structural frame 500 of the enclosure 100 is rigid and supports the mounting of the plywood panels 201 , 202, 203 (or other suitable material panels 201 , 202, 203) that make up the roof and sides of the enclosure 100 as discussed previously herein. The mounting may be accomplished by riveting, screwing, nailing, or other coupling mechanisms of the paneling 201 , 202, 203 to the structural frame 500.

[0069] In one particular embodiment, as shown in FIG. 5, the structural frame 500 may have four vertical members comprising a first vertical member 511 , a second vertical member 512, a third vertical member 513, and a fourth vertical member 514, which supply the vertical support to the structural frame 500 of the enclosure 100. The vertical members help provide vertical rigidity to the structural frame 500 of the enclosure 100. The vertical members additionally support the sides of the enclosure 100 and provide attachment points for the paneling of the sides of the enclosure 100. The vertical members also help provide vertical support for the roof of the enclosure 100. In some embodiments, more than four, or less than four vertical members may be utilized, which may depend on the geometry of the enclosure 100. The structural frame of the enclosure 100 may additionally comprise four lateral members being a first lateral member 521 , a second lateral member 522, a third lateral member 523, and a fourth lateral member 524. In some embodiments, more than four or less than four lateral members may be utilized, which may depend on the geometry of the enclosure 100. The lateral members help provide horizontal rigidity to the structural frame 500 of the enclosure 100. Additionally, the lateral members help support the sides of the enclosure 100 and provide attachment points for paneling 201 , 202, 203 of the sides of the enclosure 100. The lateral members also serve as a horizontal base-like structure for attachment of the angled roof members of the roof of the enclosure 100.

[0070] In addition, as also shown in FIG. 5, the structural frame 500 of the enclosure 100 may comprise eight angled ridge members being a first angled ridge member 541 , a second angled ridge member 542, a third angled ridge member 543, a fourth angled ridge member 544, a fifth angled ridge member 545, a sixth angled ridge member 546, a seventh angled ridge member 547, and an eighth angled ridge member 548. More than eight or less than eight angled ridge members may be utilized, which may depend on the geometry of the enclosure 100. The angled ridge members help provide support for the first angled side 121 and the second angled side 123 of the roof of enclosure 100 and provide attachment points for paneling 221 , 222, 223 of the first angled side 121 and second angled side 123 of the roof, as discussed in relation to, and illustrated in, FIGS. 2A and 4. Additionally, the angled ridge members provide for support for the first flat side 122 and the second flat side 124 of the roof of the enclosure 100 and provide attachment points for the paneling of the first flat side 122 and the second flat side 124 of the roof, as discussed in relation to, and illustrated in, FIGS. 3 and 4.

[0071] Such vertical members, lateral members, and angled ridge members are affixed to one another by four-point connection joints at the corners of structural frame 500, for example, as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. These connection joints provide structural rigidity to frame 500. As illustrated in FIG. 5, a first four-point connection joint 531 couples the first vertical member 511 , the first angled ridge member 541 , the first horizontal member 521 , and the fourth horizontal member 524, respectively, to at least one other of the other of the first vertical member 511 , the first angled ridge member 541 , the first horizontal member 521 , and the fourth horizontal member 524. A second four-point connection joint 532 couples the second vertical member 512, the fourth angled ridge member 544, the first horizontal member 521 , and the second horizontal member 522, respectively, to at least one other of the second vertical member 512, the fourth angled ridge member 544, the first horizontal member 521 , and the second horizontal member 522. A third four-point connection joint 533 couples the third vertical member 513, the fifth angled ridge member 545, the third horizontal member 523, and the fourth horizontal member 524, respectively to at least one other of the third vertical member 513, the fifth angled ridge member 545, the third horizontal member 523, and the fourth horizontal member 524. A fourth four-point connection joint 534 couples the fourth vertical member 514, the eighth angled ridge member 548, the second horizontal member 522, and the third horizontal member 523, respectively, to at least one other of the fourth vertical member 514, the eighth angled ridge member 548, the second horizontal member 522, and the third horizontal member 523.

[0072] The structural frame 500 of the enclosure 100 may additionally comprise at least one horizontal ridge member 451 , 551 as also seen in FIGS. 4 and 5. The horizontal ridge member 551 serves as the top support of the roof ridge 400. The angled ridge members connect to the horizontal ridge member 551 such that the roof ridge 400 is a rigid structure supplying ample support for the paneling 221 , 222, 223 of the sides of the roof. FIG. 4 illustrates the horizontal ridge member 451 of the roof ridge 400 of the enclosure 100 in relation to the angled ridge members of the roof. The connection points between the angled ridge members and the horizontal ridge member 451 may additionally comprise flashing affixed to the angled ridge members, as illustrated in FIG. 4. Such flashing is meant to prevent or militate against the passage of water into the interior of the enclosure 100.

[0073] FIG. 6 illustrates an exemplary four-point connection joint apparatus 531 , 532, 533, 534 used to join the horizontal, vertical, and angled ridge members of the enclosure 100. It should be appreciated that FIG. 6 illustrates an embodiment of the four-point connection joint and other suitable means may also be employed, as desired. The four-point connection joints 531 , 532, 533, 534 may be prefabricated. Pre-cut and pre-drilled brackets and members with pre-defined angles may be created to enable quick coupling and de-coupling of the horizontal, vertical, and angled ridge members while minimizing construction and material costs associated with enclosure 100 by eliminating the need to custom fabricate or weld the joints of the structural frame 500 of the enclosure 100. As seen in FIG. 4, the brackets and members may comprise 1/5”x1/5” x .25” steel angle straps, as one non-limiting example.

[0074] The structural frame 500 of the enclosure 100 may be constructed from a variety of materials including aluminum, steel, wood, polymeric, or composite materials. The members may comprise tubes. Such tubes may be substantially cylindrical, square, or other suitable geometries in orientation. Such tubes may be of a variety of thicknesses including one and one-half inch (1 -1/2”) by one and one-half inch (1 -1/2”) by one and one-eighth inch (1 -1/8”) tube. The material of construction may be selected for weatherproofing and termite proofing of the enclosure 100. The members of the enclosure 100 are selected for superior structural strength in design. Such strength, in combination with the bracketing and connection joints utilized in the structural frame, creates a robust structure that resists natural and manmade forces.

[0075] FIG. 7 illustrates an exemplary bracket 700 used in enclosure 100. Such a bracket 700 may be used as a coupling mechanism in the four-point connection joint 531 , 532, 533, 534, flashing, and other connections used in the enclosure 100. The bracket 700 may comprise a variety of bracket section lengths, including four inches (4”) for each bracket section. Such bracket 700 may be a variety of thicknesses and materials including sixteen- gauge steel. Other suitable dimensions and materials for the bracket 700 may also be employed within the scope of the disclosure.

[0076] FIGS. 1 and 8 illustrates a base 850 of the enclosure 100 according to particular embodiment of the disclosure. The base 850 of the enclosure 100 may comprise two sets of longitudinal members, being interior and exterior longitudinal members. The exterior set of longitudinal members, being a first exterior longitudinal member 801 and a second exterior longitudinal member 802, are oriented on a longitudinal exterior of the enclosure 100. The exterior set of longitudinal members provides for the support and the attachment points of the bottom edges of the first adjacent side 122 and the second adjacent side 124 of the enclosure 100. Such connections may be accomplished by three-point connection joints, which may be similar to that of the four-point connection joint 531 , 532, 533, 534 as illustrated in FIG. 6. More than two or less than two members may comprise the exterior set of longitudinal members of the base of the enclosure 100 depending on the geometry of the enclosure 100. Such exterior set of longitudinal members may be a variety of sizes, including ten feet (10’) in length. The interior set of longitudinal members, being a first interior longitudinal member 811 and a second interior longitudinal member 812, are oriented interior to the exterior set of longitudinal members and supports the paneling comprising the floor and coupled to the base 850. The interior set of longitudinal members traverse the length of the enclosure 100 and attach to the exterior set of latitudinal members via bracketing at the ends of the interior longitudinal members similar to, or the same as, the brackets 700 and the joint connection apparatus 531 , 532, 533, 534 described herein. More than two or less than two interior longitudinal members may be used in some embodiments. Such interior set of longitudinal members may be a variety of lengths including ten feet (10’).

[0077] The base 850 of the enclosure 100 may additionally comprise two sets of latitudinal members, being interior and exterior latitudinal members. The exterior latitudinal members, comprising a first exterior latitudinal member 821 and a second exterior latitudinal member 822, are oriented on the latitudinal exterior of the enclosure 100. Such exterior latitudinal members support and provide attachment points for the bottom edges of the front side 121 and the opposing side 123 of the enclosure 100, as seen in FIGS. 1A, 1 B, and 1 C. Such exterior set of latitudinal members may be a variety of sizes, including twelve feet (12’) in length.

[0078] The interior set of latitudinal members, being a first interior latitudinal member 831 , a second interior latitudinal member 832, a third interior latitudinal member 833, a fourth interior latitudinal member 834, a fifth interior latitudinal member 835, and a sixth interior latitudinal member 836, is oriented interior to the exterior set of latitudinal members and supports the paneling of the floor of the base 850 of the enclosure 100. The interior set of latitudinal members traverse the width of the enclosure 100 and attach to both the interior and exterior sets of longitudinal members via bracketing at the ends of the interior latitudinal members. More than six or less than six interior latitudinal members may be used in some embodiments. Such interior latitudinal members may be a variety of lengths, including about four feet (4’). The longitudinal and latitudinal members may be arranged in a lattice pattern of tetrahedral geometry with ninety-degree (90°) angles at the coupling of the latitudinal and longitudinal members, which may be accomplished by brackets, for example, as shown in FIGS. 8A and 8B. Such brackets may also be substantially similar to the bracket illustrated in FIG. 7. Such member arrangements supply structural rigidity to the base 850 of the enclosure 100 that allows for the support of the structural frame of the enclosure 100 as well as items that may be placed inside of the enclosure 100 such as beds, cabinetry, persons, etc. Other patterned geometries may be utilized. For example, triangular geometries between the connection of latitudinal and longitudinal members may be utilized. The base

850 attaches to the structural frame 500 of the enclosure 100 by frame-to-base connection joints to form a rigid structure.

[0079] The vertical members of the structural frame 500, as seen in FIG. 5, attach to an end of each of the exterior longitudinal members. This is illustrated in FIG. 5 by a first frame to base connection 561 , a second frame to base connection 562, a third frame to base connection 563, and a fourth frame to base connection 564. Such frame to base connections are also illustrated in FIGS. 8A and 8B as a first frame to base connection 861 , a second frame to base connection 862, a third frame to base connection 863, and a fourth frame to base connection 864, respectively.

[0080] As seen in FIGS. 5 and 8, the first exterior longitudinal member 801 and the first exterior latitudinal member 821 may couple to a first vertical member 511 at a first frame to base connection 561 , 861. The first exterior longitudinal member 801 and the second exterior latitudinal member 822 may couple to a second vertical member 512 at a second frame to base connection 562, 862. The second exterior longitudinal member 802 and the first exterior latitudinal member 821 may couple to a third vertical member 513 at a third frame to base connection 563, 863. The second exterior longitudinal member 802 and the second exterior latitudinal member 822 may couple to a vertical member 514 at a fourth frame to base connection 564, 864.

[0081] The base 850 of the enclosure 100 may additionally comprise at least one base structure 851. Such base structures 851 may be affixed to the attachment points corresponding to the intersection locations of the longitudinal and latitudinal members. Such base structures 851 provide the contact points from the tiny house or the enclosure 100 to the ground and correspondingly lifts the tiny house or the enclosure 100 off the ground to insulate the tiny house or the enclosure 100 from the elements. The base structures 851 may or may not be utilized, depending on the desire of the purchaser. The base structures

851 may comprise a variety of materials including cinder blocks, bricks, composite blocks, or other suitable base structures. The geometry of the base structures 851 may be regarded as substantially tetrahedral. The number of base structures 851 utilized may depend on the number of connections between the longitudinal and latitudinal members. For example, as

seen in FIGS. 8A and 8B, sixteen base structures 851 are used, corresponding to sixteen connections of the longitudinal and latitudinal members.

[0082] Although the plurality of concrete base structures 851 arranged in a grid pattern are shown and described herein, it should also be appreciated that a single concrete slab may also be poured and affixed to the attachment points and used, as desired.

[0083] The longitudinal and latitudinal members of base 850 of enclosure 100 may comprise the same or similar material as the frame members described above. All members may be constructed from a variety of materials including aluminum, steel, wood, polymeric, or composite materials. Such members may be a tube variety. Such tubes may be cylindrical, square, or other suitable geometries in orientation. Such tubes may be a variety of thicknesses including one and one-half inch (1 -1/2”) by one and one-half inch (1 -1/2”) by one and one-eighth inch (1-1/8”) tube. The material of construction may be selected for weatherproofing, rust-proofing, and termite proofing of the enclosure 100 and for superior structural strength in design. Such strength, in combination with the bracketing and connection joints utilized in the base 850 creates a robust structure that resists natural and manmade forces.

[0084] The base 850 of the enclosure 100 may additionally comprise a floor, for example, as shown in FIGS. 5 and 10. The floor of enclosure 100 may be constructed of a variety of materials including plywood, which may be three-quarters inch (3/4”) thick plywood. Additional materials such as metal, sheetrock, composite, or other suitable materials utilized for a floor may also be used. The floor may be constructed by the joining of multiple pieces of plywood (or other suitable materials) together with H-style panel connectors; and such connectors or posts are illustrated in FIG. 2B. In some embodiments, two equivalent length and width panels may be joined by a single panel connector. As previously described, panel connectors ensure a tight connection between the pieces of plywood (or other suitable materials) used as the floor to prevent or militate against leakage of air and/or liquid into the enclosure 100. Other suitable panel connectors may additionally be utilized. The use of multiple pieces of precut plywood and panel connectors allows for quick and simple assembly of the floor of the enclosure 100. Correspondingly, the bill of materials for the base 850 of the enclosure 100 is minimal and readily available, thus minimizing the capital costs associated with the construction of enclosure 100.

[0085] FIG. 10 illustrates an exemplary construction of the base 850, as also seen in FIGS. 8A and 8B, and the floor of the enclosure 100. The floor construction may comprise multiple panels of plywood. Additional or alternative materials such as drywall, metal, sheetrock, composites, or other suitable materials may be combined with, or separate from, plywood. The panels may be coupled to at least one of panel via the use of adhesives, or other coupling means, such as the H-style panel connectors shown in FIG. 2B, to form the floor. As shown in FIG. 10, the floor paneling may comprise a first floor panel 1050, a second floor panel 1051 , as well as additional floor panels. The floor panels 1050, 1051 may be positioned such that the panels rest on top of the base 850 of the enclosure 100, as discussed in relation to, and illustrated in, FIGS. 8A and 8B. The panels 1050, 1051 may be coupled to the base 850 of the enclosure 100 by a variety of coupling means including nut- and-bolt combinations, screws, rivets, nails, or other suitable coupling mechanisms.

[0086] FIGS. 8 and 10 illustrate the base 850 of the enclosure 100, as seen in FIG. 1 , in relation to the floor paneling. Also seen in FIG. 10 is a first exterior longitudinal member 1001 , a first exterior latitudinal member 1021 , a second exterior latitudinal member 1022, a first interior longitudinal member 1011 , a first interior latitudinal member 1031 , and a fourth interior latitudinal member 1034.

[0087] It should be appreciated that the enclosure 100 of the present disclosure is designed to withstand elemental and manmade forces such that deployment of the enclosure 100 is available in extreme environments. As such, a method of weatherproofing is incorporated into the design of the enclosure 100.

[0088] In the method, the first step of weatherproofing may comprise utilizing the H-style connectors, as illustrated in FIG. 2B and described hereinabove, to join the panels used in the sides, floor, and roof of enclosure 100. Such H-style connectors help to insulate the interior of the structure, help prevent or militate against outside weather elements from entering the interior of the structure and help to provide structural support. Other suitable panel connectors may be utilized.

[0089] A second step of the method may comprise caulking the edges of the H-style connected panels 201 , 202 with a caulking material 206 , for example, as shown in FIG. 2E. This step also helps provide waterproofing and insulation of the connected panels. In some embodiments, materials other than caulking may be utilized, such as epoxides, resins, or other suitable composite materials.

[0090] In a third step, as shown in FIGS. 2E and 9, the method may comprise applying an elastomeric coating 208, 900 to all open joints of the panels on the exterior of enclosure 100. The joints may be regarded as the area of intersections of paneling of the sides, roof, and the floor of enclosure 100. One elastomeric coating 208, 900 may comprise a silicone- based coating. Acrylic- based coatings and other coatings known in the art are also contemplated. The elastomeric coating 208, 900 may additionally be applied with weatherproof tape for a greater level of protection. For example, the weather proof taping may be applied to the joints on the sides, roof, and/or the floor of the enclosure 100. The elastomeric coating 208, 900 may then be applied over the weather proof taping. In some embodiments the elastomeric coating 900 may comprise a composition that includes epoxides, resins, or other waterproofing coatings. One skilled in the art may also select other suitable elastomeric coatings 208, 900 as desired.

[0091] A next step of the method may comprise caulking the joints of the panels after the application of the elastomeric coating and/or weatherproof tape. Such a combination of coating and caulking seals the joints and edges and creates an air-tight enclosed structure. Since the sealed panel joints and edges may be coupled to one another by an elastomeric coating and/or weatherproof taping, air may be unable to penetrate the joints’ elastomeric membrane either into, or from, the structure of the enclosure 100 such that the joints and/or structure may be regarded as air-tight. Additionally, the sealed joints and edges may also be regarded as waterproof in that rain, or other precipitation, may not penetrate the elastomeric coating’s hydrophobic membrane.

[0092] It is contemplated that the joints are sealed on the exterior of the enclosure 100 with a thin layer of caulking or other sealant, as described herein, to waterproof the interior of the structure. When the enclosure 100 is desired to be moved locations, the seals may be removed by using a bladed device, such as, but not limited to, a razor knife.

[0093] In some embodiments, materials other than caulking may be utilized, such as epoxides, resins, or other suitable composite materials.

[0094] A final step of the method may comprise applying a heat-reflective coating to at least a portion of the entire exterior surface of enclosure 100. FIG. 9 illustrates such a heat reflective coating application. Such a heat reflective coating is meant to insulate enclosure 100 from UV radiation that otherwise would over-heat the exterior of enclosure 100 and correspondingly raise the interior temperature of enclosure 100 to uninhabitable levels.

Such a heat-reflective coating may be NXT Cool Zone, commercially available from Nutech Paint, located at 2-4 Keppler Circuit, Seaford, 3198, VIC, Australia, or other suitable heat- resistant coatings. Such a method of weatherproofing enclosure 100 creates a structure that may be regarded as heat resistant. The ultraviolet radiation reflective properties of the reflective coating may reflect the suns radiation such that the roof of the enclosure 100 does not increase in temperature and thermally radiate into the enclosure 100. As such, the temperature inside the enclosure 100 does not rise to the high levels it otherwise would in the absence the thermal coating, thus the enclosure 100 may be regarded as heat resistant.

[0095] The enclosure 100 may also incorporate additional apparatuses for air handling to help create an inhabitable internal structure environment, even when the ambient air conditions are uninhabitable. Such apparatuses may comprise windows, doors, portholes, louvers, or other air- flow apertures that help supply ambient air flow through the enclosure 100. Additionally, air temperature regulating apparatuses such as air conditioning and heating may be incorporated in the enclosure 100 to decrease or increase the ambient temperature inside the structure of the enclosure 100. These apparatuses in combination with the heat-insulated design of the enclosure 100 enables the overall structure to be weather resistant and supply an inhabitable living condition even when the surroundings would seem to prohibit construction.

[0096] As shown above, through the use of pre-defined materials, the enclosure 100 comprises a low bill of materials, leading to quick construction and de-construction that may be accomplished by unskilled labor, thereby minimizing or lowering the cost of the structure assembly. As previously discussed in relation to the sides, roof, and floor of the enclosure 100, paneling of a variety of geometries, dimensions, and materials of construction may be utilized to lower costs and increase flexibility in size. H-Style connections are utilized to join the sides, roof, and floor, rather than adhesives, for simplicity in construction. In relation to the frame, varying lengths of tubes may be utilized, in combination with connection joints, such as the three- and four-point connection joints as discussed previously, to allow for ease in the erection of the frame of the enclosure 100. Additionally, a variety of materials may be utilized for the frame of the enclosure 100. All of the components of the enclosure 100 are manageable in size, such that one or more individuals may construct and install the house without the assistance of industrial equipment such as cranes or personal lifts. Additionally, the construction of the enclosure 100 may be accomplished in in less than 24 hours by a

single unskilled laborer and less than 12 hours by a single skilled laborer. The low costs and fast construction of the enclosure 100 enable unique applications such as emergency response and housing for the homeless. The enclosure 100 of the present disclosure, through its unique features, meets these requirements and serves as a superior tiny house design than the current state of the art.

[0097] FIG. 12 illustrates an exemplary attic-type structure of the enclosure 100. The attic- type structure may comprise a first attic longitudinal horizontal member 1271 , a second attic longitudinal horizontal member 1273, an attic latitudinal horizontal member 1270, an attic vertical member 1272, an attic first panel 1280, an attic second panel 1281 , an attic four- point connection joint 1275, and an attic three-point connection joint 1276. The first attic longitudinal horizontal member 1271 and the second attic longitudinal horizontal member 1273 may supply longitudinal lateral support for the paneling of the attic-type structure. The first attic panel 1280 and the second attic panel 1281 may comprise substantially tetrahedral plywood paneling. Additional or alternative materials such as drywall, metal, sheetrock, composites, or other suitable materials may be combined with, or separate from, plywood. The attic panels may be positioned on top of the attic longitudinal horizontal members. The panels may be coupled to the attic longitudinal horizontal members by a variety of coupling means such as nut-and-bolt combinations, screws, rivets, nails, or other suitable coupling mechanisms. The first attic longitudinal horizontal member 1271 may be coupled to the attic latitudinal horizontal member 1270 via the attic four-point connection joint 1275. The first attic longitudinal horizontal member 1271 may be coupled to the second lateral member 1222 via the three- point connection joint 1276. The second attic lateral member 1222 may be the same as the second lateral member 522 as discussed in relation to, and illustrated in, FIG. 5. The second attic longitudinal horizontal member 1273 may be coupled to the attic latitudinal horizontal member 1270 and the second lateral member 1222 in a substantially similar way to the three- and four-point connection joints used for coupling the first attic longitudinal horizontal member 1271. Additionally, more attic lateral members may be present in some embodiments. The three- and four-point connection joints may be substantially similar to the four-point connection joint as discussed in relation to, and illustrated in, FIG. 6.

[0098] The attic latitudinal horizontal member 1270 may supply latitudinal lateral support for the paneling of the attic-type structure. The panels may be coupled to the latitudinal

horizontal member 1270 by a variety of coupling means such as nut-and-bolt combinations, screws, rivets, nails, or other suitable coupling mechanisms. The attic latitudinal horizontal member 1270 may be coupled to the first lateral member 1221 and the third lateral member 1223. The first lateral member 1221 , the third lateral member 1223, and the second four- point connection joint 1232 may be the same as the first lateral member 521 , the third lateral member 523, and the second four-point connection joint 532 as discussed in relation to, and illustrated in, FIG. 5. The attic vertical member 1272 may supply the vertical support for the attic type structure. The attic vertical member 1272 may be coupled to the first attic longitudinal horizontal member 1271 and the attic latitudinal horizontal member 1270 by four-point connection joint 1275. The attic-type structure may be regarded as substantially tetrahedral in geometry.

[0099] It should be appreciated that the attic-type structure may enable placement of air conditioning or heating apparatuses within the enclosure 100. The attic structure may also provide storage space within the enclosure 100. The corresponding rigid structure of the attic lateral and verticals members additionally increases the structural rigidity of enclosure 100. The members of the attic-type structure may be constructed from a variety of materials including steel, wood, polymeric, or composite materials. The members may comprise tubes. Such tubes may be substantially cylindrical, square, or other suitable geometries in orientation. Such tubes may be of a variety of thicknesses including one and one-half inch by one and one-half inch by one and one-eighth inch tube. As illustrated in FIG. 12, the third angled ridge member 1243 may be the same as the third angled ridge member 543, the fourth angled ridge member 1244 may be the same as the fourth angled ridge member 544, the seventh angled ridge member 1247 may be the same as the seventh angled ridge member 547, and the eighth angled ridge member 1248 may be the same as the eighth angled ridge member 548 as discussed in relation to, and illustrated in, FIG. 5.

[00100] In certain embodiments, such as shown in FIG. 13, a plurality of the enclosures 100 may connected by mechanical fasters and employed to form a two- or three-story structure. In such cases, exterior stairways may be employed that that bolt thru, or otherwise connect with, the exterior frame of the enclosures 100 for multiple walk up apartments. The stairways may be made from aluminum tubes, brackets and stainless bolts and HPL panels as the main structure, for example. They are bolted into the cement slab surrounding the unit and act as a structural support which stiffens the entire structure. The enclosures 100 may also be connected laterally by mechanical fasteners to increase an overall volume of livable or usable space within the ultimate multi-room structure.

[00101] It should be further understood that the components of the enclosures 100 described hereinabove may be provided loosely or separately in the form of a kit for the rapid construction of tiny houses as the needs arise. The enclosures 100 are also readily de- constructible as described hereinabove, and may be stored or transported for later emergency use. One skilled in the art will understand that the enclosures 100 of the present disclosure are also usable as standard or permanent dwellings and do not need to be necessarily used in emergency situations.

[00102] While certain representative embodiments and details have been shown for purposes of illustrating the invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made without departing from the scope of the disclosure, which is further described in the following appended claims.