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1. (WO2019049131) DEVICES AND METHODS FOR AUTOMATIC ENGAGEMENT OF A MECHANICAL WAH EFFECT-PEDAL
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DEVICES AND METHODS FOR AUTOMATIC ENGAGEMENT OF A

MECHANICAL WAH EFFECT-PEDAL

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to devices and methods of engaging or bypassing the use of an effect-pedal that is coupled to operate with an electric music instrument, such as an electric guitar, while the electric music instrument is in use. More particularly, the present invention relates to devices for automatic engagement of a mechanical effect-pedal.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The sound of an electric music instrument, such as an electric guitar, can be modified by devices known in the art as "effect-pedals", or in short "pedals", that are in electric communication with the coupled electric music instrument. Effects pedals for music instruments, such as volume or wah-wah pedals, are typically opera ted by a lever mechanism, wherein the opening/closing movement of the pedal change sound parameters controlled by a potentiometer. For exampl e, wide pedal opening means allowing higher volume or lower frequency.

The present invention will be described in terms of the electric music instrument being an electric guitar, but the devices for automatic engagement/bypassing of an effect-pedal of the present invention is not limited for use with an electric guitar, and may be used with any other electric music instrument, as may be obvious to an average person of the art.

Referring now to the drawings, Fig. la depicts an example prior art electrical music system 10 that includes an electric guitar 20, a common sound amplifier 30 and a common mechanical effect-pedal 40. Fig. lb depicts effect-pedal 40 in a front, elevated perspective view, and Fig. lc depicts effect-pedal 40 in a rear, elevated perspective view.

Effect-pedal 40 includes an ON/OFF switch 46, configured to switch effect-pedal 40 ON or OFF, wherein when effect-pedal 40 is switched ON, effect-pedal 40 is engaged to affect the sound signal arriving from acoustic element 22 of guitar 20 via electric cable 50. When effect-pedal 40 is switched OFF, the effect-pedal 40 is disengaged and therefore does not affect the sound signal arriving from acoustic element 22 of guitar 20 via electric cable 50, wherein the sound signal bypasses effect-pedal 40 and reaches amplifier 30 via electric cable 52.

The term "activated" is used to describe the situation where the sound signal is set to be changed (affected) by effect-pedal 40, that is turned ON. The pedal sweeps the peak response of a frequency filter up and down at a low frequency to create the sound effect of a spectral glide, also known as the "wah effect". The pedal alters the tone of the sound signal to create a distinctive sound effect of mimicking the human voi ce saying the onomatopoeic name "wah-wah", or simulating the sound made by a trumpet when the bell is alternately covered and uncovered.

The term "deactivated" is used to describe a situation where the sound signal cannot be changed by effect-pedal 40, as effect-pedal 40 is turned OFF.

There exist several types of effect-pedals including mechanical moving effect-pedals

(40), optical effect-pedals, magnetic pedals and pedals with no moving parts. A mechanical effect-pedals 40 further includes, in addition to a mechanical ON/OFF switch 46, a static base 42 and a moving-member 44 (also referred to as "rocker"), configured to pivot about an axis 48, situated at the rear end section 49 of mechanical effect-pedals 40.

Mechanical effect-pedals 40 are popular for a variety of reasons, but suffer from an inherent design problem. To create the wanted effect on the sound signal, the user pivotally pushes down and/or up moving-member 44 towards or away from static base 42, wherein that pivotal motion of moving-member 44 about axis 47 in direction 41, creates the desired sound effect.

However, in order for the effect to take place, the user must first push down (all the way) moving-member 44 towards static base 42 to thereby activate mechanical ON/OFF switch 46, in order to turn ON mechanical effect-pedals 40. Only after mechanical ON/OFF switch 46 has been turned ON, the sound effect can be controlled by moving moving-member 44.

It should be noted that when mechanical ON/OFF switch 46 is turned ON, the sound signal arriving from acoustic element 22 of guitar 20 is altered, even though the moving-member 44 is not moving. Therefore, it is often desired by the player of guitar 20, when he/she is not using effect-pedals 40, to turned OFF mechanical ON/OFF switch 46.

The ON/OFF switching problem is solved for example by the mentioned optical effect-pedals, magnetic pedals and pedals with no moving parts. For example, optical effect-pedals are shown in http://www.morieypedajs.com/tag/wah-pedais/; effect-pedals are shown in https://wwwihomann.de/gb/fe and US patent 8,822,806 is an example of a non-moving parts solution.

Still, many players prefer the mechanical pedals because of their sound, or other factors, such as branding, size, price, etc. Hence, attempts were made to solve this problem, by adding automatic engage/bypass mechanism to the existing mechanical effect-pedals 40. For example, German utility model DE202004014892, which offers a solution for a pedal controlled musical instrument effect that has a mechanical switch to activate effect as soon as the pedal is depressed without further change. Another example solution is shown in http://wvw.glab om.pl/index^hpfe^ In this solution, the mechanical effect-pedal 40 is placed on a separate device, wherein the guitar 20 is connected to effect-pedal 40 via this device, and the device engages/bypasses the effect, when it senses the user's foot pressing on the pedai that is placed above the device. The drawbacks of this device include malfunctioning when the user is sitting, for example; difficulties when switching from this pedal to another; and large dimensions.

US patent application 2016/0019877 discloses systems and methods of networking and managing audio effects processors for musical instruments and vocal microphones, in which multiple sets of parameter settings involved in audio effects processing can be stored as well as modified within a central management hub. In response to one or more simple user inputs, the respective sets of parameter settings can be recalled or otherwise accessed from the central management hub and applied to selected ones of the audio effects processors, thereby allowing both musicians and vocalists to create a multitude of characteristic sounds with their musical instruments and vocal microphones, respectively, with increased convenience and ease-of-use. However, these systems utilize newly designed digital effect-pedals.

US patent application 2006/01 1052 discloses a sound-effect foot pedal for electric/electronic musical instruments, wherein the sound effect is controlled by means of a foot treadle that can uniquely control multiple parameters. The rate at which the foot treadle controls the effect is by means of a specific and unique optical coupling. To enable precise control of the effect, there is a visible read out of the modulation frequency which has not been achieved before in a foot pedal. Further, the modulation frequency can be controlled by a MIDI sync code which is also unique in a foot-pedal format. Again, the effect-pedal is a newly designed digital effect-pedal and not a retrofitted mechanical pedal.

There is therefore a need and it would be advantageous to provide a solution to the ON/OFF switching problem of a common mechanical effect-pedal 40, which solution does not suffer from the drawbacks of existing solutions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The principal intentions of the present invention include providing an electrical music system to determine if the moving-member 44 of a common effect-pedal 40 is in use or not. If it is determined that the moving-member 44 of the common effect-pedal 40 is in use, a processor of an effect-pedal-switching device of the electrical music system keeps the common effect-pedal 40 engaged. If it is determined that the moving-member 44 of the common effect-pedal 40 is not in use, a processor of the effect-pedal-switching device keeps the common effect-pedal 40 disengaged (bypassed). Thereby, it becomes unnecessary for the person utilizing an electric music instrument that is coupled with an effect-pedal 40 having a mechanical ON/OFF switch 46, to activate/deactivate the effect-pedal 40, while playing the electric music instrument.

According to the teachings of the present invention, there is provided a pedal-controlled ground effect system having an electric music instrument and a common mechanical effect-pedal, the effect system is utilized for automated engagement/bypassing control of the mechanical effect-pedal.

The common electric music system, includes the electric music instrument configured to generate a sound signal, a sound amplifier and the common effect-pedal, wherein the sound signal is configured to flow via an electrical path from the common electric music instrument to the sound amplifier.

The common effect-pedal includes an ON/OFF switch, configured to allow a user to switch the effect-pedal between an "activated state" and a "deactivated state", and a moving-member, configured to affect the sound signal, when the moving-member is pivotally moved about an axis 47.

When the ON/OFF switch is switched ON, the effect-pedal is in the activated state and is engaged to affect the sound signal arriving from the common electric music instrument by the pivotal motion of the moving-member, and when the ON/OFF switch is switched OFF, the effect-pedal is in the deactivated state and is disengaged from the common electric music instrument and thereby, the sound signal bypasses the effect-pedal.

The effect-pedal-switching device includes a processing unit and a relay, wherein the processing unit is configured to determine if the effect-pedal is in the activated state or in the deactivated state.

Upon determining that the effect-pedal is in the deactivated state, the processing unit sets the relay to route the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the amplifier, thereby bypassing the effect-pedal, and bringing the effect-pedal-switching device to a "bypassed state".

Upon determining that the effect-pedal is in the activated state, the processing unit is further configured to detect pivotal changes of the moving-member, and upon detecting pivotal motion of the moving-member, the processing unit sets the relay to route the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the effect-pedal and then to the amplifier, bringing the effect-pedal-switching device to an "engaged state". If no pivotal motion of the moving-member is detected, while the effect-pedal is in the activated state, the processing unit sets the relay to route the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the amplifier, thereby bypassing the effect-pedal, and bringing the effect-pedal-switching device to an "disengaged state", being the "bypassed state".

The common electric music instrument may be an electric guitar, an electronic keyboard, an electric piano, an electric bass or any other electrical music instrument.

In some embodiments, the effect-pedal-switching device is a DSP-based effect-pedal-switching device, wherein the processing unit is a DSP element. The DSP-based effect-pedal-switching device is configured to:

a) sample the sound signal at selected locations on the electrical path of the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the sound amplifier;

b) analyze the sampled signals, to thereby determine if the effect-pedal is in the activated state or in the deactivated state; and

c) sample the sound signal at selected locations on the electrical path of the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the sound amplifier, and analyze the sampled signals to thereby detect pivotal changes of the moving- member.

Upon detecting pivotal motion of the moving-member, the DSP element sets the relay to route the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the effect-pedal and then to the amplifier, bringing the DSP-based effect-pedal-switching device to an "engaged state".

In some embodiments, a first sampling pair of the sound signal is performed at the entrance (A) to the effect-pedal and at the exit (B) of the effect-pedal and occurs in a pre-usage calibration step, wherein the DSP-based effect-pedal -switching device is configured to compare and analyze the first sampling pair, to thereby determine if the effect-pedal is in the "engage state" or in the "bypass state".

In some embodiments, a second sampling pair of the sound signal is performed at the exit (B ) of the effect-pedal and occurs in a sampling time (t-1) and at a time ft), wherein the DSP-based device is configured to compare and analyze the second sampling pair, to thereby determine if the moving-member of the effect-pedal has moved.

In some embodiments, the sampling of the sound signal at the exit (B) of the effect-pedal is performed using an envelope filter detector.

Optionally, the effect-pedal further includes a preset cocked-wah range, and wherein upon determining that the effect-pedal is in an activated state and that the moving-member has not moved, the effect-pedal-switching device is confi gured to determine if the moving-member is within the cocked-wah range, the processing unit sets the relay to route the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the effect-pedal and then to the amplifier, bringing the effect-pedal-switching device to an "engaged state".

In some embodiments, the determining that the moving-member is within the cocked-wah range, is performed base on signal received from a sensor, such as a two-parts sensor.

In some embodiments, the detecting of pivotal changes of the moving-member is enhanced by a signal received from a step-on sensor that is activated when a foot of a user is positioned on the moving-member. Preferably, the step-on sensor is a detachable sensor.

The step-on sensor may be an optical sensor, a proximity sensor, a movement sensor such as an accelerometer sensor, a contact sensor, a pressure sensor or any other sensor.

In some embodiments, the effect-pedal has an ON-OFF -imitating sensor operatively attached thereto, wherein the ON-OFF-imitating sensor is configured to transmit a signal to the coupled sensor based effect-pedal-switching device, indicating if the ON/OFF switch is set to either ON or OFF.

In some embodiments, a sensor based effect-pedal-switching device may include a power port configured to supply the power of the effect-pedal, wherein the processing unit is configured to check the voltage and/or electric current at the power port, to thereby determine if the ON/OFF switch is set to either ON or OFF,

According to further teachings of the present invention, there is provided a pedal-controlled ground effect method having a common electric music instrument and a common

mechanical effect-pedal, the effect method is utilized for automated engagement/bypassing control of the effect-pedal, the method including the steps of:

a) providing a pedal -controlled ground effect system as described here above; b) activating the effect-pedal;

c) determining if the moving-member of the effect-pedal has moved; and d) upon determining that the moving-member of the effect-pedal has moved, setting the effect-pedal-switching device to an "engaged" state and repeating step (c); and upon determining that the moving-member of the effect-pedal has moved, setting the effect-pedal-switching device to a "bypassed" state and go to step (c).

The effect-pedal may further include a preset cocked-wah range, wherein upon determining that the moving-member of the effect-pedal has not moved, the method further including the steps of:

a) determining if cocked-wah is required and upon determining that cocked-wah is not required, go to step (d) here above; else

b) determining if the moving-member is within the cocked-wah range and upon determining that the moving-member is within the cocked-wah range, go to step (c) here above.

In some embodiments, the effect-pedal-switching device is a DSP-based effect-pedal-switching device, having a processing unit that is a DSP element, wherein the method further includes the steps of:

a) sampling the sound signal at selected locations on the electrical path of the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the sound amplifier, b) analyzing the sampled signals, to thereby determine if the effect-pedal is in the activated state or in the deactivated state;

c) sampling the sound signal at selected locations on the electrical path of the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the sound amplifier, and analyze the sampled signals to thereby detect pivotal changes of the moving-member; and

d) upon detecting pivotal motion of the moving-member, setting the relay to route the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the effect-pedal and then to the amplifier, bringing the DSP -based effect-pedal -switching device to an "engaged state".

In some embodiments, the effect-pedal-switching device is a sensor-based effect-pedal-switching device, having a sensor coupled to operate with the effect-pedal and associated with the processing unit, wherein the method further includes the steps of:

a) receiving a signal from the sensor;

b) determining if said moving-member has pivotally moved, based on said received signal of the detect pivotal changes of the moving-member (not clear); and

c) upon detecting pivotal motion of the moving-member, setting the relay to route the sound signal from the common electric music instrument to the effect-pedal and then to the amplifier, bringing the sensor-based effect- pedal-switching device to an "engaged state".

Optionally, the sensor is a step-on sensor that is activated when the foot of a user is positioned on the moving-member.

Optionally, the sensor is a two-parts sensor that is activated when the moving-member i s moved pivotally.

Optionally, the effect-pedal further includes a preset cocked-wah range, and wherein the sensor is a two-parts sensor configured to detect if the moving-member is within the cocked-wah range.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will become fully understood from the detailed description given herein below and the accompanying drawings, which are gi ven by way of illustration and example only and thus not limitative of the present invention, and wherein:

Fig. la depicts a prior art electrical music system having an electric guitar, a sound amplifier and an effect-pedal.

Fig. lb depicts the effect-pedal shown in Fig. la in a front, elevated perspective view.

Fig. lc depicts the effect-pedal shown in Fig. la in a rear, elevated perspective view.

Fig. 2 illustrates a DSP-based effect-pedal-switching device for automated engagement/bypassing control of a mechanical effect-pedal, according to embodiments of the present invention.

Fig. 3 illustrates a first sensor based effect-pedal-switching device for automated

engagement/bypassing control of a mechanical effect-pedal, according to embodiments of the present invention, utilizing a step-on sensor.

Fig. 4a illustrates a second sensor-based effect-pedal-switching device for automated engagement/bypassing control of a mechanical effect-pedal, according to embodiments of the present invention, utilizing a two-parts sensor.

Fig. 4b depicts the effect-pedal, as shown in Fig, lb, in a front, elevated perspective view, wherein and ON-OFF-imitating sensor has been added thereto, according to embodiments of the present invention.

Fig. 5 is an example flow-chart diagram outlining a method for automated engagement/bypassing control of a mechanical effect-pedal, according to embodiments of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention will now be described more fully hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which preferred embodiments of the invention are shown. This invention may, however, be embodied in many different forms and should not be constmed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein; rather, these embodiments are provided, so that this disclosure will be thorough and complete, and will fully convey the scope of the invention to those skilled in the art.

An embodiment is an example or implementation of the inventions. The various appearances of "one embodiment," "an embodiment" or "some embodiments" do not necessarily all refer to the same embodiment. Although various features of the invention may be described in the context of a single embodiment, the features may also be provided separately or in any suitable combination. Conversely, although the invention may be described herein in the context of separate embodiments for clarity, the invention may also be implemented in a single embodiment.

Reference in the specification to "one embodiment", "an embodiment", "some embodiments" or "other embodiments" means that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with the embodiments is included in at least one embodiment, but not necessarily all embodiments, of the inventions. It is understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein are not to be constmed as limiting and are for descriptive purpose only.

Meanings of technical and scientific terms used herein are to be commonly

understood as to which the invention belongs, unless otherwise defined. The present invention can be implemented in the testing or practice with methods and materials equivalent or similar to those described herein.

Reference is made back to the drawings. Fig. 2 illustrates an electrical music system 100 for an activated electric music instrument 20, utilizing a DSP based effect-pedal-switching device 110 for automated engagement/bypassing control of a mechanical effect-pedal 40, according to embodiments of the present invention, the DSP being a digital signal processor. Electrical music system 100 further includes all elements of prior art electrical music system 10, that is, electric guitar 20 (or any other electric music instrument), sound amplifier 30 and effect-pedal 40.

It should be noted that orientation related descriptions such as "bottom", "up", "upper", "down", "lower", "top" and the like, assumes that the associated item is operationally situated. With respect to effect-pedal 40, moving-member 44 is operatively situated at the top side of mechanical effect-pedals 40. It should be noted that it is assumed that the ON/OFF switch 46 of effect-pedal 40 has been set ON and the effect-pedal 40 is in an activated state, and remaining in this state throughout a usage session of using electric music instrument 20 coupled with the mechanical effect-pedal 40.

DSP-based device 110 includes a DSP element 112 and a relay unit 114, wherein DSP-based device 110 is operatively connected between electric guitar 20 and sound amplifier 30, and wherein effect-pedal 40 is controllably connected to DSP based effect-pedal-switching device 110.

Relay unit 114 is an electrical switch that may either allow the incoming sound signal from electric guitar 20 to flow, via electric cable 50 and electric cable 153, through effect-pedal 40 and then to sound amplifier 30 ("engaged state") via electric cable 52 and electric cable 155, or flow directly from electric guitar 20 to sound amplifier 30 ("bypassed state") via bypass path 151.

DSP element 112 is configured to detect movement of moving-member 44 (rocker), by comparing input(O), output(O), input(t), input(t-l), output(t) and output(t-l),

where t is current sampling time,

input is input signal to effect-pedal 40 (at location A');

output is output signal from effect-pedal 40 (at location B);

input(O) and output(O) are the input and output signals, as sampled when the effect-pedal 40 is bypassed;

input(t) and outputft) are the input and output signals, as currently sampled, while the effect-pedal 40 is engaged; and

inp t(t-l) and output(t-l) are the input and output signals, as previously sampled, while the effect-pedal 40 is engaged.

The signal comparison-process includes analyzing at least one aspect that is related and/or altered by a wah-wah effect-pedal 40, including the following aspects: frequency response, frequency filter, peak response of frequency filter, "spectral glide", bandpass filter, moving bandpass filter, low-pass filter, over-coupled low-pass filter, resonant peak, etc.

DSP element 112 is configured to control relay unit 114, and thereby switch between engaged state and bypassed state of DSP based effect-pedal-switching device 110, based on actions performed by a user of electrical music system 100, as follows:

In a first DSP based effect-pedal-switching embodiment, DSP based effect-pedal-switching device 110 performs a pre-usage, calibration step, for example by comparing the sound signal at points A (or A') and B, while the effect-pedal 40 is activated (switched ON) and moving-member 44 of effect-pedal 40 is idle. Thereby, DSP based effect-pedal-switching device 110 obtains a first-idle-reference-sound-signal. This is equivalent to the ability of the human ear to determine that effect-pedal 40 is used or not.

In the first DSP based effect-pedal-switching embodiment, comparison is performed by DSP element 112 at point B with the first-idle-reference-sound-signal. If the sound signals are the same, allowing a marginal threshold difference, it is determined that moving-member 44 of effect-pedal 40 has not moved, and thereby, set relay 114 to the bypassed state, that is to disconnect points A to A' and point B to B', and connect point A and B', to thereby bypass effect-pedal 40. Otherwise, it is determined that moving-member 44 of effect-pedal 40 has moved, and thereby, set relay 114 to the engaged state, that connects points A to A' and point B to B', and disconnects points A to B', and to thereby engage effect-pedal 40.

In a second DSP based effect-pedal-switching embodiment, comparison is performed by DSP element 112 at point B, using, for example, an envelope filter detector: a. If the "envelop characteristic" of the sound signal did not change from time t~l to time t, it is determined that moving-member 44 of effect-pedal 40 has not moved and thereby, set relay 114 to the bypassed state, that disconnects points A to A' and point B to B', and connects point A and B', to thereby bypass effect-pedal 40.

b. If the "envelop characteristic" of the sound signal did change from time t-1 to time t, it is determined that moving-member 44 of effect-pedal 40 has moved and thereby, set relay 114 to the engaged state, that disconnects points A to B', and to thereby engage effect-pedal 40.

In a third DSP based effect-pedal-switching embodiment, the first embodiment and the second DSP based embodiment are combined Such combination enhances the reliability of the decision whether moving-member 44 has moved.

Reference is now made to Fig. 3, illustrating a first sensor based embodiment of an electrical music system 200, including an electric music instrument 20 that utilizes a first sensor-based effect-pedal-switching device 210 for an automated engagement/bypassing control of an activated mechanical effect-pedal 40, according to embodiments of the present invention. Electrical music system 200 further includes a step-on sensor 248, being an addon sensor that converts common effect-pedal 40 into a retrofitted effect-pedal 240. Electrical music system 200 further includes all elements of prior art electrical music system 10, that is, electric guitar 20 (or any other electric music instrument), sound amplifier 30 and effect-pedal 40.

First sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 210 includes a processing unit 212 and a relay unit 214, wherein first sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 210 is operatively connected between electric guitar 20 and sound amplifier 30, and wherein effect-pedal 40 is controilably connected to first sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 210.

First sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 210 further includes an electrical switch/relay 214 that may either allow the incoming sound signal from electric guitar 20 to flow, via electric cable 50 and electric cable 253, through effect-pedal 40 and then to sound amplifier 30 ("engage state") via electric cable 52 and electric cable 255, or flow directly from electric guitar 20 to sound amplifier 30 ("bypass state") via bypass path 251. Step-on sensor 248 is preferably a detachable sensor, shown in an example top position and may be positioned on effect-pedal 40 at various other locations. Step-on sensor 248, being for example an optical sensor, a proximity sensor, a movement sensor such as an acceierometer sensor, a touch/contact sensor or a pressure sensor, is configured to detect whether the user's foot is placed over moving-member 44 or not. Based on the signal sent to first sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 210 by step-on sensor 248, via electric cable 243 or wireless, first sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 210 determines the state setting of relay 214.

a. If no stepping-on signal or an idle signal is detected, it means that the user's foot is not placed over moving-member 44, and therefore, set relay to bypass state, that connects point A and B', to thereby bypass effect-pedal 40.

b. If a stepping-on signal is detected, it means that the user's foot is placed over moving-member 44, and therefore, set relay 214 to engage state, that connects point A to A' and point B to B', to thereby engage effect-pedal 40.

Optionally, detachable sensor 248, is placed on any of the sides of moving-member 44 and not on top of moving-member 44, by using, for example, an optical sensor, a proximity sensor, a movement sensor such as an acceieronieter sensor, a contact sensor or a pressure sensor.

Reference is now made to Fig. 4a, illustrating an electrical music system 300 for an electric music instrument 20, utilizing a second sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 310 for an automated engagement/bypassing control of a mechanical effect-pedal 40, according to embodiments of the present invention. Electrical music system 300 further includes a two-parts sensor 348, being an add-on sensor that converts common effect-pedal 40 into a retrofitted effect-pedal 340. Electrical music system 300 further includes all elements of prior art electrical music system 10, that is, electric guitar 20 (or any other electric music instrument), sound amplifier 30 and effect-pedal 40.

Sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 310 includes a processing unit 312 and a relay unit 314, wherein sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 310 is operatively connected between electric guitar 20 and sound amplifier 30, and wherein effect-pedal 40 is controllably connected to sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 310.

It should be noted that a mechanical effect-pedal 40 may include another preconfigured idle angular position of rocker 44, for example, is fully pressed down, in which angular position there is no sweep sound, but the tone is still altered, and known in the art as a "cocked wah". This position is configured to provide a different sound envelope to the sound signal and therefore, referred to as a second-idle-cocked-reference-sound-signal . The first and second reference sound signals enable processing unit 312 to better determine whether moving-member 44 has moved.

Second based effect-pedal-switching device 310 is an electrical switch that may either allow the incoming sound signal from electric guitar 20 to flow through effect-pedal 340and then to sound amplifier 30 ("engage state"), or flow directly from electric guitar 20 to sound amplifier 30 ("bypass state"). Two-parts sensor 348 is preferably a detachable sensor. Two-parts sensor 348, being for example a magnetic sensor (such as a window alarm magnetic sensor), a proximity sensor or a light sensor, is configured to detect whether the moving-member 44 has moved with respect to static base 42. Based on the signal sent to second sensor based effect-pedal-switching device 310 by two-parts sensor 348 via electric cable 343 or wireless, second sensor-based effect-pedal-switching device 310 determines the state setting of relay switch 314;

a. If no signal change received from two-parts sensor 348 is detected or a first-idle- reference-sound-signal is detected, it means that moving-member 44 has not moved with respect to static base 42, and if the pivotal position of moving-member 44 is not within the second-idle-cocked-reference-sound-signal, set relay 314 to bypass state, that connects point A and B', to thereby bypass effect-pedal 340. If moving-member 44 has not moved with respect to static base 42 but is within the second-idle-cocked-reference-sound-signal, set relay 314 connects point A to A' and point B to B', to thereby engage effect-pedal 340.

b. If a second-idle-cocked-reference-sound-signal or a signal change received from two-parts sensor 348 is detected, it means that moving-member 44 has moved with respect to static base 42, and therefore, set relay 314 to engage state, that connects point A to A' and point B to B', to thereby engage effect-pedal 340.

It should be noted that the cocked wah sound may be configured to be at other pivotal positions (other than the fully pressed down position) of the moving-member 44, for example at the mid-pivotal -range of the moving-member 44.

Fig. 4b depicts an effect-pedal 344 in a front, elevated perspective view, wherein an ON-OFF-imitating sensor 346 has been added thereto, according to variations of the present invention. ON-OFF-imitating sensor 346 and add-on sensor that converts common effect-pedal 40 into a retrofitted effect-pedal 341. In this variation of a sensor based an electrical music system (200, 300) ON-OFF-imitating sensor 346 is calibrated such that when mechanical ON/OFF switch 46 is set to ON position, ON-OFF-imitating sensor 346 transmits a signal to the coupled sensor based effect-pedal-switching device indicating that the ON/OFF switch 46 is set to ON. When mechanical ON/OFF switch 46 is set to OFF

position, ON-OFF-imitating sensor 346 may transmits a signal to the coupled sensor based effect-pedal-switching device indicating that the ON/OFF switch 46 is set to OFF, or may not transmit a signal at all. ON-OFF-imitating sensor 346 may be either mechanical or electrical, for example, a touch sensor, a magnet based sensor, a proximity sensor, an electromagnetic fields (EMF) sensor/detector, etc. In one embodiment, the EMF is attached to the original power cord of effect-pedal 341, and by checking the electromagnetic field on cord, sensor based effect-pedal-switching device (210, 310) can detect if and what power is used by effect-pedal 341, and thereby, if ON/OFF switch 46 is set to either ON or OFF.

According to further variations of the present invention, a sensor based effect-pedal-switching device (210, 310) may include a power port (not shown), configured to supply the power of the effect-pedal (40, 240, 340, 341), wherein the processing unit is configured to check the voltage and/or electric current at this power port, to thereby determine if ON/OFF switch 46 is set to either ON or OFF.

It is an aspect of the present invention to provide a method 400 for automated engagement/bypassing control of a mechanical effect-pedal (40, 240, 340, 341), according to embodiments of the present invention, using an external effect-pedal-switching device such as effect-pedal -switching device (110, 210, 310), without altering the common effect-pedal 40 itself.

Fig. 5 is an example flow-chart diagram outlining method 400 for automated engagement/bypassing control of a mechanical effect-pedal (40, 240, 340, 341), according to embodiments of the present invention, the effect-pedal (40, 240, 340, 341) being part of an electrical music system (100, 200, 300) that further includes electric guitar 20 (or any other electric music instrument) and a sound amplifier 30.

Initially, the effect-pedal (40, 240, 340, 341) needs to be activated (just once for a playing session) and therefore, if effect-pedal (40, 240, 340, 341) has not been activated yet (step 401) proceed to step 410 and activate (turn ON) effect-pedal (40, 240, 340, 341), using ON/OFF switch 46. Method 400 proceeds with the following steps:

Step 430: checking if the moving-member of the effect-pedal has moved.

The processor (112, 212, 312) of effect-pedal-switching device (110, 210, 310) determines if the moving-member 44 of effect-pedal (40, 240, 340, 341) has moved.

In some embodiments, motion of moving-member 44 is determined by a DSP element 112 by analyzing the "envelop characteristic" of the sound signal at preselected locations on the electrical path of the sound signal from the electric music instalment to the sound amplifier.

In some embodiments, motion of moving-member 44 is determined by a processing unit 212 by determining if a user's foot is placed over moving-member 44 or not.

In some embodiments, motion of moving-member 44 is determined by a processing unit 312 by analyzing the distance between the parts of a two-parts sensor 348.

If the moving-member 44 of effect-pedal (40, 240, 340, 341) did move, go to step 440.

Step 432: check if cocked-wah is required.

Optionally, the processor (112, 212, 312) of effect-pedal-switching device (110, 210, 310) checks if cocked-wah is required.

If this option is not required, go to step 450.

Step 434: check if the moving-member cocked-wah is within a preconfigured position range.

The processor (112, 212, 312) of effect-pedal-switching device (110, 210, 310) determines if moving-member 44 is within a preconfigured pivotal position range that is predefined to be the cocked-wah range. For example, with no limitations, the fully pressed down position or proximal thereto.

If moving-member 44 is not within the cocked-wah range, go to step 450,

Step 436: the moving-member is not within the cocked-wah range.

The processor (112, 212, 312) of effect-pedal-switching device (110, 210, 310) determines that moving-member 44 is within the cocked-wah range.

Step 440: set the effect-pedal-switching device to "engaged" state.

Therefore, processor (112, 212, 312) sets effect-pedal-switching device (110, 210, 310) to "engaged" state. That is, connect points A to A' and point B to B', and disconnect points A to B'.

Go to step 430.

Step 450: Set the effect-pedal-switching device to "bypassed" state.

The processor (112, 212, 312) sets effect-pedal-switching device (110, 210, 310) to "bypassed" state. That is, disconnect points A to A' and point B to B', and connect points A to B' ,

Go to step 430.

The invention being thus described in terms of several embodiments and examples, it will be obvious that the same may be varied in many ways. Such variations are not to be regarded as a departure from the spirit and scope of the invention, and all such modifications as would be obvious to one skilled in the art.