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1. (WO2019066953) DISPOSITIFS À NITRURE DU GROUPE III (III-N) À RÉSISTANCE DE CONTACT RÉDUITE ET LEURS PROCÉDÉS DE FABRICATION
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GROUP III-NITRIDE (III-N) DEVICES WITH REDUCED CONTACT RESISTANCE AND THEIR

METHODS OF FABRICATION

BACKGROUND

In the fields of wireless communication and power management, various components can be implemented using solid-state devices. For example, in radio frequency (RF) communication, the RF front-end is a generic term for the circuitry between an antenna and a digital baseband system. Such RF front-end components may include one or more diodes in conjunction with one or more transistors, such as one or more field-effect transistors (FETs). Due, in part, to their large bandgap and high mobility, gallium nitride (GaN) and other group Ill-nitride (III-N) materials are suited for integrated circuits for applications such as high-frequency and high-power.

For many non-silicon materials, it can be challenging to provide doped semiconductor material suitable for making a good ohmic contact. Contact structures and techniques to reduce contact resistance and sheet resistance may advantageously reduce overall device resistance to enhance device performance and/or reduce device power consumption.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The material described herein is illustrated by way of example and not by way of limitation in the accompanying figures. For simplicity and clarity of illustration, elements illustrated in the figures are not necessarily drawn to scale. For example, the dimensions of some elements may be exaggerated relative to other elements for clarity. Also, various physical features may be represented in their simplified "ideal" forms and geometries for clarity of discussion, but it is nevertheless to be understood that practical implementations may only approximate the illustrated ideals. For example, smooth surfaces and square intersections may be drawn in disregard of finite roughness, corner-rounding, and imperfect angular intersections characteristic of structures formed by nanofabrication techniques. Further, where considered appropriate, reference labels have been repeated among the figures to indicate corresponding or analogous elements.

Figure 1 A illustrates an isometric and plan views of a III-N transistor having a source and drain structures with enhanced surface area, in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure.

Figure IB illustrates a plan view of a terminal structure with a first and a second plurality of fins, in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure.

Figure 1C illustrates a cross-sectional view of a source structure having sidewalls that intersect at an apex and a source contact above the source structure, in an accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure.

Figure ID illustrates a cross-sectional view of a source structure having sidewalls that intersect over a spacer separating portions of the source structure and a source contact above the source structure, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure.

Figure IE illustrates a cross-sectional view of a contact structure in contact with a source structure having an upper surface area with corrugation, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure.

Figure IF illustrates a cross-sectional view of a III-N transistor having a source structure and a drain structure with enhanced surface area, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure.

Figure 1G illustrates a cross sectional view of a III-N transistor between two successive fins.

Figures 2A illustrates a plan view of a patterned polarization charge inducing layer on a patterned III-N material, in an accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure.

Figures 2B illustrates a cross-sectional view of a patterned polarization charge inducing layer on a patterned III-N material, in an accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure

Figure 3 A illustrates a plan view of the structure of Figure 2A following the formation of isolation structures surrounding the patterned polarization charge inducing layer and the patterned III-N material.

Figure 3B illustrates a cross-sectional view of the structure of Figure 2B following the formation of isolation structures surrounding the patterned polarization charge inducing layer and the patterned III-N material.

Figure 4A illustrates a plan view of the structure of Figure 3 A following the formation of masking structure over a portion of the polarization charge inducing layer and the formation of drain structures and source structures on unmasked portions of the patterned polarization charge inducing layer.

Figure 4B illustrates a cross-sectional view of the structure of Figure 3B following the formation of masking structure over a portion of the polarization charge inducing layer and the formation of drain structures and source structures on unmasked portions of the patterned polarization charge inducing layer.

Figure 4C illustrates a cross-sectional view of a source structure formed on a plurality of fins on sidewalls of the fins.

Figure 5 A illustrates a plan view of the structure of Figure 4 A following the removal of the masking layer and deposition of a dielectric layer on the source structure, drain structure and on the polarization charge inducing layer.

Figure 5B illustrates a cross-sectional view of the structure of Figure 4B following the removal of the masking layer and deposition of a dielectric layer on the source structure, drain structure and on the polarization charge inducing layer.

Figure 6 A illustrates a plan view of the structure of Figure 5 A following the formation of a gate opening in the dielectric layer over a portion of the polarization charge inducing layer.

Figure 6B illustrates a cross-sectional view of the structure of Figure 5B following the formation of a gate opening in the dielectric layer over a portion of the polarization charge inducing layer.

Figure 7 A illustrates a plan view of the structure of Figure 6 A following the formation of a gate structure in the opening and on the polarization charge inducing layer.

Figure 7B illustrates a cross-sectional view of the structure of Figure 6B following the formation of a gate structure in the opening and on the polarization charge inducing layer.

Figure 8 A illustrates a plan view of the structure of Figure 7 A following the formation of drain and source contact openings above the drain structures and source structures.

Figure 8B illustrates a cross-sectional view of the structure of Figure 7B following the formation of drain and source contact openings above the drain structures and source structures.

Figure 9 A illustrates a plan view of the structure of Figure 8 A following the formation of drain contact and source contact in the openings.

Figure 9B illustrates a cross-sectional view of the structure of Figure 8B following the formation of drain contact and source contact in the openings.

Figure 9C illustrates a cross-sectional view of a source contact formed on a source structure formed on a plurality of fins.

Figure 10 is a functional block diagram of a group III-N SoC implementation of a mobile computing platform, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure.

Figure 11 illustrates a computing device in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure.

Figure 12 illustrates an integrated circuit structure in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure.

DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

Devices including III-N materials for logic, SoC and memory applications and their methods of fabrication are described. In the following description, numerous specific details are set forth, such as novel structural schemes and detailed fabrication methods in order to provide a thorough understanding of embodiments of the present disclosure. It will be apparent to one skilled in the art that embodiments of the present disclosure may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well-known features, such as enhancement mode operations associated with group III-N devices, are described in lesser detail in order to not unnecessarily obscure embodiments of the present disclosure. Furthermore, it is to be understood that the various embodiments shown in the Figures are illustrative representations and are not necessarily drawn to scale.

Certain terminology may also be used in the following description for the purpose of reference only, and thus are not intended to be limiting. For example, terms such as "upper", "lower", "above", and "below" refer to directions in the drawings to which reference is made. Terms such as "front", "back", "rear", and "side" describe the orientation and/or location of portions of the component within a consistent but arbitrary frame of reference which is made clear by reference to the text and the associated drawings describing the component under discussion. Such terminology may include the words specifically mentioned above, derivatives thereof, and words of similar import.

In the following description, numerous details are set forth. However, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art, that the present disclosure may be practiced without these specific details. In some instances, well-known methods and devices are shown in block diagram form, rather than in detail, to avoid obscuring the present disclosure. Reference throughout this specification to "an embodiment" or "one embodiment" or "some embodiments" means that a particular feature, structure, function, or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least one embodiment of the disclosure. Thus, the appearances of the phrase "in an embodiment" or "in one embodiment" or "some embodiments" in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily referring to the same embodiment of the disclosure. Furthermore, the particular features, structures, functions, or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner in one or more embodiments. For example, a first embodiment may be combined with a second embodiment anywhere the particular features, structures, functions, or characteristics associated with the two embodiments are not mutually exclusive.

As used in the description and the appended claims, the singular forms "a", "an" and "the" are intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. It will also be understood that the term "and/or" as used herein refers to and encompasses any and all possible combinations of one or more of the associated listed items.

The terms "coupled" and "connected," along with their derivatives, may be used herein to describe functional or structural relationships between components. It should be understood that these terms are not intended as synonyms for each other. Rather, in particular embodiments,

"connected" may be used to indicate that two or more elements are in direct physical, optical, or electrical contact with each other. "Coupled" may be used to indicated that two or more elements are in either direct or indirect (with other intervening elements between them) physical or electrical contact with each other, and/or that the two or more elements co-operate or interact with each other (e.g., as in a cause an effect relationship).

The terms "over," "under," "between," and "on" as used herein refer to a relative position of one component or material with respect to other components or materials where such physical relationships are noteworthy. For example, in the context of materials, one material or material disposed over or under another may be directly in contact or may have one or more intervening materials. Moreover, one material disposed between two materials may be directly in contact with the two layers or may have one or more intervening layers. In contrast, a first material "on" a second material is in direct contact with that second material/material. Similar distinctions are to be made in the context of component assemblies.

As used throughout this description, and in the claims, a list of items joined by the term "at least one of or "one or more of can mean any combination of the listed terms. For example, the phrase "at least one of A, B or C" can mean A; B; C; A and B; A and C; B and C; or A, B and C.

In the fields of wireless communication and power management, various components can be implemented using solid-state devices. For example, in radio frequency (RF) communication, the RF front-end is a generic term for the circuitry between an antenna and a digital baseband system. Such RF front-end components may include one or more transistors, such as one or more field-effect transistors (FETs). Due, in part, to their large bandgap and high mobility, gallium nitride (GaN) and other III-N materials are suited for integrated circuits for applications such as high-frequency and high-power. However, optimizing power efficiency of RF-front end components and minimizing energy loss during operation is highly desirable. Devices such as transistors fashioned from III-N materials, may be susceptible to energy loss from various sources such as from conduction and switching losses. The latter is affected by the transition between "on" and "off states during device operation. In particular, transitioning between on and off states of the transistor may be affected by resistances within the device. Device resistances include internal resistances associated carrier mobility within the channel material, and external resistances between the channel material and external contacts associate with source and drain resistances and metal-semiconductor junction resistances. III-N channels generally have high carrier mobility, but to fully capitalize on this attribute, external resistance should be minimized. Thus, pathways to minimize contact resistance are especially attractive for practical realization of devices based on III-N materials.

In an embodiment of the present disclosure, a device, such as a transistor includes a terminal structure having a first III-N material. In one embodiment, the terminal structure has a central body and a first plurality of fins adjacent to a first side of the central body, and a second plurality of fins adjacent to a second side of the central body, opposite the first side of the central body. A polarization charge inducing layer is above the terminal structure and includes a second III-N material. A gate electrode is disposed on the polarization charge inducing layer above a portion of the central body. The device further includes a source structure and a drain structure each having an impurity dopant on opposite sides of the gate electrode. In an embodiment, the source structure is epitaxially grown on the polarization charge inducing layer, above a second portion of the central body and on sidewalls of the first plurality of fins, where the source structure comprises a third III-N material. In an embodiment, the drain structure, including the third III-N material, is epitaxially grown on the polarization charge inducing layer, above a third portion of the central body and on sidewalls of the second plurality of fins. A source contact is disposed on the source structure and a drain contact is disposed on the drain structure. The inventors have discovered that when the epitaxially grown source and drain structures are formed on a backbone of fin like structures that are fashioned from a third III-N material, the 3D nature of epi growth, is more pronounced leading to a larger effective surface area than that obtained from a single block of source or a drain structure (for e.g. in a planar geometry) spanning a same foot print as the fin structure. The source and drain contacts, consequently have a larger area to contact the epitaxially grown 3D source and drain structures above the first and second plurality of fins, respectively. An effective increase in contact area between the source contact and the source structure and between the drain contact and the drain structure can reduce the contact resistance of the transistor by as much as 70%. By reducing the contact resistance of the transistor, the external resistance of a III-N transistor may be reduced.

Furthermore, while traditional methods have focused on creating recesses in the first III- N material, epitaxially growing the source and drain structures on the polarization charge inducing layer may eliminate extra process operations and any adverse issues arising from creating recesses, such as damage of the first III-N material. By leaving the polarization charge inducing layer on the terminal structure, a 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is created everywhere at an interface between the polarization charge inducing layer and the underlying first III-N material of the terminal structure. Furthermore, when the source and drain is disposed above the fins the 3D nature of epi growth may also contact the 2DEG on sidewalls of the first and second plurality of fins, in the source-drain area, rather than contacting a 2DEG at the edge of active gate area in devices having recesses in the first III-N material. Such a contact between the source and drain structures and the 2DEG on sidewalls of the device away from the active

gate area results in no penalty on device performance.

Figure 1 A illustrates an isometric view of a III-N device 100, such as a III-N transistor, having a terminal structure 102 that includes a first III-N material, in an accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure. Figure IB illustrates a plan view layout of the terminal structure 102 along a line A-A' of the isometric view in Figure 1 A. In one embodiment, the terminal structure 102 has a central body 102 A, a first plurality of fins including individual fins 102B and a second plurality of fins including individual fins 102C. In the illustrated

embodiment, three fins are shown, but there can be any number of such fins (e.g., ranging from 2 to thousands). In an embodiment, the fins have a length, LF, that is between 500nm to lOOOnm.

Referring again to the isometric view in Figure 1 A, a polarization charge inducing layer

104 is disposed above an uppermost surface of the terminal structure 102. In an embodiment, the polarization charge inducing layer 104 includes a second III-N material. The device 100 further includes a gate electrode 106 above the polarization charge inducing layer 104. A source structure 108 and a drain structure 110, each including a third III-N material with an impurity dopant, are disposed on opposite sides of the gate electrode 106 on the polarization charge inducing layer 104. The source structure 108 is above a central body portion 102E, on sidewalls of the central body portion 102E and on sidewalls of the first plurality of fins 102B. The drain structure 110 is disposed above a central body portion 102F, on sidewalls of the central body portion 102F and on sidewalls of the second plurality of fins 102C. The device 100 further includes a source contact 112 on the source structure 108, and a drain contact 114 on the drain structure 110. The region between each fin 102B, and between each fin 102C is occupied by a spacer 118. In an embodiment, the spacer 118 is below a level of an uppermost surface of the fins, 102B or 102C.

Referring to Figure 1C, in the illustrative embodiment, the source structure 108 covers an interface 103 between the polarization charge inducing layer 104 and the fin 102B. In one such embodiment, the source structure 108 is in direct contact with the 2DEG (dashed lines 105). Each source structure 108 above each fin 102A also has a pair of sidewalls 116A and 116B that are sloped. In the illustrated embodiment, the sidewalls 116A and 116B extend onto portions 120 of the spacer 118. In other embodiments, the sidewalls 116A and 116B do not extend onto the spacer 118, but is disposed over the interface 103 (not shown). In an extreme example, the sidewall 116A from one source structure 108 can meet an adjacent sidewall 116B from another source structure 108, but not overlap. When adjacent sidewalls overlap appreciably, the contact area from a 3D source structure may diminish.

The slope of each of the sidewalls 116A or 116B depends on the material of the source structure 108. In one example, each sidewall 116A and 116B has an angle that is approximately

60 degrees with respect to an uppermost surface of the fin 102B. In one such example, the sidewalls 116A and 116B intersect at an apex as is depicted in Figure 1C. Furthermore, in the illustrated embodiment, the sidewalls 116A and 116B intersect at an apex, but the sidewall 116A of one source structure 108 does not intersect with a neighboring sidewall 116B from a neighboring source structure 108. In other embodiments, an upper portion of the source structure 108 can have curvature indicated by dashed lines 117.

In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 1C, the source contact 112 has an area of contact with the source structure 108, where the area of contact has a first dimension, in the X-Y plane and a second dimension along the Z direction (into the page). In an embodiment, the first dimension of the area of contact has a magnitude that is given by the sum of a length, Ls, 0f each of the sloped sidewalls 116A and 116B of the source structure 108. In an embodiment, the sum of the length Ls 0f all of the sidewalls 116A and 116B is greater than a combined width, Ws, where Ws, is approximately equal to the sum of the width, WF, of each of the fins 102B and the sum of the individual width, Ws, of the spacer 118 between each of the fins 102B, i.e.

∑ Ls > Ws (1)


It is to be appreciated that in the illustrated embodiment, the relative magnitude of the WF and WSP will determine if the source structure 108 can actually provide a contact area advantage. In one example, where sidewalls 116A and 116B are sloped at approximately 60 degrees, and the width, WSP, of each spacer 118 is equal to or less than the width, WF, of the fin 102B, relationship (1) is satisfied. In other embodiments, when sidewalls 116A and 116B are sloped at 60 degrees relative to an uppermost surface of the fin 102B, the width, WSP, of each spacer 118 can be up to two times the width, WF, of each fin 102B for relation (1) to be satisfied. In yet another embodiment, when the sidewalls 116A and 116B are sloped at an angle that is less than 60 degrees but greater than 30 degrees, the width, WSP, of each spacer 118 can be equal to or less than the width, WF, of each fin 102B to obtain a contact area advantage.

In an embodiment, each fin 102B has a width, WF, between lOOnm - 500nm and the source structure 108 has a height, Hs, between 80nm-430nm, and each of the spacers 118 has a width between 50nm-100nm. In, one such embodiment, the length, Ls, of sidewall 116A or 116B is between 100nm-500nm.

In an example, the sidewall 116A from one source structure 108 can meet a neighboring sidewall 116B from neighboring source structure 108 on the spacer 118, as is depicted in the cross-sectional illustration of Figure ID. In one such example, the length, Ls of the sidewall 116A and 116B of the source structure 108 in Figure ID is greater compared to the length, Ls of the sidewall 116A and 116B of the source structure 108 depicted in Figure 1C. A source

structure depicted in Figure ID can offer a greater contact area for the source contact 116 as compared to the contact area from the source contact 116 depicted in Figure 1C.

It is to be appreciated that an increased contact area from a 3D source structure may provide diminishing returns when a sidewall 116A from one source structure 108 depicted in Figure ID, merges further with a neighboring sidewall 116B from neighboring source structure 108. While the combined length, Ls, of each sidewall 116A and 116B of a source structure 108 having multiple merged sidewalls may be increased, other factors such as increased intrinsic resistance of the source structure 108 may outweigh, benefits obtained from a surface area increase.

Referring again to Figure 1A, the source contact 112 has a second dimension (in a plane that is into the page) that is approximately equal to a length of the fin 102B. To further increase the area of contact between the source contact 112 and the source structure 108, the source contact 112 can extend over the entire source structure 108. In one such example, the source contact 112 is also in contact with a source structure sidewall 108A, adjacent to the gate 106. Similarly, in the illustrative embodiment, the drain contact 114 extends along a portion of the fin 102C. To further increase a contact area between the drain contact 114 and the drain structure 110, the drain contact 114 can extend over the entire drain structure 110. In one such example, the drain contact 114 is also in contact with a drain structure sidewall 110A.

In one or more embodiments, the drain structure 110 has one or more or all of the features of the source structure 108 and the drain contact 114 has one or more or all of the features of the source contact 112 described above in the various embodiments.

An embodiment where the sidewalls 116A or 116B of the source structure 108 do not intersect at an apex is illustrated in Figure IE. The source structure 108, in such an example, is characterized by an uppermost surface 122 that is corrugated, where the corrugation is between 10nm-50nm. Corrugation of the uppermost surface 122 may result in a larger surface area for source contact 112 compared to an uppermost surface that is not corrugated. In one such example, the fin 102B has a width, WF, that is at least lOOnm and the height, Hs, of the source structure 108 is between 50nm-70nm and the sidewalls 116A and 116B have a slope of approximately 60 degrees (relative to lowermost surface of the source structure 108).

In an embodiment, the first III-N material includes a gallium nitride (GaN). In one such embodiment, the first III-N material has a relatively high carrier mobility, (greater than 500 cm2 V"1). The first III-N material may be a substantially un-doped III-N material (i.e., 02 impurity concentration minimized) for minimal impurity scattering. In other embodiments, the first III-N material includes one or more ternary alloys of GaN, such as AlGaN, AlInN, or a quaternary alloy of GaN including at least one group III element and nitrogen, such as InxAlyGai-x-yN, where x ranges from 0.01-0.1 and y ranges from 0.01-0.1. Depending on applications, the first III-N material has a material thickness approximately in the range of lOOnm -5um.

In an embodiment, the source structure 108 and drain structure 110, have uppermost surfaces that are above the level of the polarization charge inducing layer 104 and the isolation layer 118. In an embodiment, the source structure 108, drain structure 110 include a third III-N material that is lattice matched to the first III-N material of the terminal structure 102. In one exemplary embodiment where the terminal structure 102 is GaN the source structure 108, drain structure 110 includes a single crystal of InGaN. In the illustrative embodiment, the source structure 108 and the drain structure 110 include faceted crystals having sidewalls, such as sidewalls 116A and 116B, that are approximately 60 degrees with respect to an uppermost surface of the first or the second plurality of fins.

In an exemplary embodiment, the third III-N material includes an impurity dopant such as an n-type dopant. Examples of an n-type dopant includes a material such as Si or Ge. In one embodiment, the n-type dopant material is silicon. As a further example, the silicon n-type dopant may have a n-dopant density of at least lF19/cm3. Doping of the source structure 108 can reduce the bandgap between the source contact 112 and the source structure 108. Likewise, doping of the drain structure 110 can reduce the bandgap between drain contact 114 and the drain structure 110. A reduced bandgap may lead to a reduced contact resistance of the device 100. In an embodiment, a combination of the height and length of the source structure 108 and drain structure 110, the n-type dopant density, and 3D faceted sidewalls help to achieve a specific contact resistance value that is less than 200 ohms. In an embodiment, the source structure 108 and the drain structure 110 each includes a third III-N material having an indium content that increases from 1% to 10%, where the higher indium content is proximate to the source contact 112 and drain contact 114, respectively. A higher indium content at an interface between the source structure 108 and the source contact 112 and between the drain structure 110 and the drain contact 114 may reduce the bandgap even further.

In an embodiment, the source contact 112, and the drain contact 114 each include a multilayer stack. In an embodiment, the multi-layer stack includes two or more distinct layers of metal such as a layer of Ti, Ru or Al and a conductive cap on the layer of metal. The conductive cap may include a material such as W or Cu.

Examples of the spacer 118 may include any material that is sufficiently strong to provide electrical isolation such as, but not to, limited silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, carbon doped nitride and carbon doped oxide.

Figure IF illustrates a cross-sectional view (along the Y-Z plane) of the device 100 depicted in Figure 1 A, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure. In an

embodiment, the gate 106 includes a gate dielectric layer 106 A and a gate electrode 106B. In the illustrated embodiment, the gate dielectric layer 106A is between the polarization charge inducing layer 104 and the gate electrode 106B and also on sidewalls of the gate electrode 106B. The gate has a length, LG, a parameter of the III-N material transistor. Depending on

embodiments, the LG, is between 50nm-500nm.

In an embodiment, the polarization charge inducing layer 104 includes a suitable second III-N material which induces strain in the first III-N material, below an interface between the second III-N material and the first III-N material. In an embodiment, the polarization charge inducing layer 104 includes a strain inducing material such as but not limited to AlzGai-zN, AlwIn1-wN, or A1N, where Z ranges from 0.2-0.3 and W ranges from 0.7-0.85. One combination includes a polarization charge inducing layer 104 that is AlGaN and a first III-N material that is GaN. In one such combination, the AlGaN polarization charge inducing layer 104 has a bandgap (3.7 eV) that is wider than the bandgap of the GaN III-N material 102 (3.4 eV), facilitating a quantum well at the interface between the AlGaN polarization charge inducing layer 104 and the GaN III-N material 102. In an embodiment, the polarization charge inducing layer 104 introduces a polarization difference in an upper interface 126 between terminal structure 102 and the polarization charge inducing layer 104, creating a conducting sheet of charge known as a 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG - represented by dashed lines 105) in the vicinity of an uppermost surface of the terminal structure 102. The presence of the 2DEG leads to current conduction between the source structure 108 and the drain structure 110 in the device 100. By negatively biasing the gate relative to the drain contact 110, the 2DEG is turned off.

The gate dielectric layer 106A may have a high relative permittivity (i.e., dielectric constant, K). In some high-K gate dielectric embodiments, the gate dielectric layer 106A is a metal oxide (e.g., including oxygen and one or more metals, such as, but not limited to, aluminum, hafnium, zirconium, tantalum or titanium). In another embodiment, the gate dielectric layer 106A includes a silicon dioxide or a silicon nitride. In some examples, the gate dielectric layer 106 A has a thickness between 2nm and 10 nm.

In an embodiment, the gate electrode 106B includes a metal such as but not limited to Pt, Ni and an alloy such as TiN or TaN. In one such embodiment, the gate electrode 106B has a length, LG, approximately in the range of 10-30nm. In some embodiments, the gate electrode 106B further includes a work function metal and a gate cap. The work function metal may include a metal such as Pt, Ni, and an alloy such as TiN or TaN and the gate cap may include a metal such as W.

Figure 1G illustrates a cross sectional illustration of the device 100 in the Y-Z plane between two successive fins 102B. The illustrative embodiment depicts a portion of the source structure 108 and drain structure 110 disposed on sidewalls of central body 102A and over the interface 103 between an uppermost surface of the central body 102 A and lowermost surface of the polarization charge inducing layer 104. The source structure 108 and the drain structure 110 are in contact with the 2DEG below the interface 103 enabling one of many pathways for current to flow between source structure 108 to drain structure 110. It is to be appreciated that the width of the central body 102A determines the minimum channel length of the device 100.

Figures 2A-9A and Figures 2B-9B illustrate plan and cross-sectional views, respectively, representing various operations in a method of fabricating a group III-N transistor, in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure. In the illustrative embodiments, the plan view illustrations are not drawn to scale with the cross-sectional illustrations. Furthermore, all cross-sectional views in Figures 2B-9B, unless otherwise specified, are taken along a line A-A in the plan view illustrations in Figures 2A-9A.

Figures 2A and 2B illustrate a plan view and a cross sectional view, respectively of a patterned polarization charge inducing layer 204 on a patterned first III-N material 202 formed above a substrate 200, in an accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure.

Referring to Figure 2B, in an embodiment, the first III-N material 202 is grown on the substrate 200 by a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process at a temperature in the range of 1000-1100 degrees Celsius. In an embodiment, the first III-N material 202 has a material composition that is the same or substantially the same as the first III-N material utilized in terminal structure 102. In an embodiment, the first III-N material 202 is a GaN layer. In an embodiment, the GaN III-N material 202 is grown to a thickness that is approximately in the range of 100nm-5 micrometers. The first III-N material 202 may have a defect density less than (lF10/cm2) when grown to a sufficient thickness, such as a thickness of at least lOOnm.

In an embodiment, the polarization charge inducing layer 204 is formed on the first III-N material 202. The polarization charge inducing layer 204 may be formed using a MOCVD process and grown immediately after the growth of the first III-N material 202. In an

embodiment, the polarization charge inducing layer 204 is grown by a MOCVD process at a temperature in the range of 1000-1100 degrees Celsius. Depending on the embodiment, the polarization charge inducing layer 204 includes a material such as but not limited to A1N, AlInN or AlyGai.yN (where y is 0.24-0.36) and the first III-N material 202 includes a material such as but not limited to InGaN or GaN. The polarization charge inducing layer 204 may be grown to a thickness between 3nm and 20nm. In an exemplary embodiment, the polarization charge inducing layer 204 is AlInN. A polarization charge inducing layer 204 having a thickness between 3nm-10nm may induce strain in an uppermost surface of the first III-N material 202. The presence of sufficient strain in the first III-N material 202 induces 2DEG (represented by dashed lines 205) in the strained region.

In an embodiment, the substrate 200, includes a semiconductor material such as but not limited to silicon, silicon germanium (Ge) or silicon carbide (SiC). In an exemplary

embodiment, the substrate 200 is a silicon substrate having a (100) top surface. A silicon substrate 200 with a (100) top surface enables co-integration of silicon CMOS transistor technology with a III-N material. In a second embodiment, the silicon substrate 200, has a (111) top surface. In embodiments, the first III-N material 202 and the substrate 200 have mismatched lattice structures. The lattice mismatch between the first III-N material 202 and the substrate 200 may be between 15% - 50 %.

In an embodiment, a mask (not shown) is formed on the polarization charge inducing layer 204. In one embodiment, a plasma etch process is utilized to etch the polarization charge inducing layer 204 and the first III-N material 202 through an exposed area in the mask. An example of an outline 201 of the mask, illustrated in the plan view illustration of Figure 2 A, defines the shape of a terminal structure that will be subsequently formed. The outline 201 of the terminal structure is similar to an outline of the terminal structure 102 illustrated in the plan view illustration of Figure 1 A. In Figure 2 A, the terminal structure to be formed has two fins in each of the source and drain regions, 206A and 206B, respectively. Referring to the cross-sectional illustration of Figure 2B, an opening 207 is formed sufficiently deep to subsequently define isolation regions. In one embodiment, the opening 207 has a depth between 75nm and 200nm.

Figures 3 A and 3B illustrate a plan view and a cross-sectional view, respectively of the structures of Figures 2 A and 2B, respectively, following the formation of an isolation layer 210 surrounding the polarization charge inducing layer 204 and the patterned first III-N material 202. In an embodiment, an isolation layer 210 is blanket deposited on the surface of the polarization charge inducing layer 204 and on the patterned first III-N material 202. Examples of the isolation layer 210 may include any material that is sufficiently strong to provide electrical isolation such as, but not to, limited silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, carbon doped nitride and carbon doped oxide. The isolation layer 210 is subsequently planarized, for example using a chemical mechanical polish process. In the embodiment depicted in the cross-sectional illustration of Figure 2B, the CMP process forms the isolation layer 210 having an uppermost surface that is co-planar or substantially co-planar with an uppermost surface of the polarization charge inducing layer 204.

The isolation layer 210 is subsequently recessed below a level of an interface 207 between an uppermost surface of the first III-N material 202 and a lowermost surface of the polarization charge inducing layer 204 to expose the 2DEG (dashed line 205) as shown in the cross-sectional illustration taken along the direction A- A' of the plan view illustration of Figure 2B. In an embodiment, isolation layer 210 is recessed utilizing a wet chemical etch by an amount between 5nm-10nm.

Figures 4A and 4B illustrate a plan view and a cross-sectional view, respectively, of the structures of Figures 3 A and 3B, respectively, following the formation of a source structure 216 and source structure 218 on the polarization charge inducing layer 204. Referring to Figure 4B, in an embodiment, a mask 214 is formed on a portion of the polarization charge inducing layer 204 by a process of depositing an insulator material and subsequently patterning the insulator material without damaging the underlying polarization charge inducing layer 204. The mask 214 may include a material that can withstand high temperature processing such as a silicon oxide or a silicon nitride where the material composition of the silicon oxide or the silicon nitride is sufficiently different from the material composition of the isolation layer 210. The mask 214 is designed to prevent merging of the source structure 216 and the drain structure 218. In a different embodiment, the isolation layer 210 can be recessed after the formation of a mask 214 as opposed to during a prior operation.

In an embodiment, after forming the mask 214, the source structure 216 and the drain structure 218 are epitaxially grown from exposed and undamaged surface of the polarization charge inducing layer 204. Epitaxial growth of drain structure 218 may utilize a variety of techniques, such as for example a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process. The MOCVD process may be carried out at process temperatures between 1000 and 1100 degrees Celsius.

As shown in the plan view illustration of Figure 4A, the source structure 216 is grown to form a continuous structure over a portion of the central body 202A and over the first plurality of fins 202B and the drain structure 218 is grown to form a continuous structure over a portion of the central body 202A and over the second plurality of fins 202C. The plan view illustration also provides an outline of the spatial extent of the source structure 216 and the drain structure 218.

In a process known as lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO), conditions are engineered to favor advancing a lateral growth face of a nucleated crystal of the source structure 216 and of the drain structure 218 as illustrated in the cross-sectional illustration of Figure 4B. In one example, the lateral growth face manifests in a sloped sidewalls 216A and 216B on the source structure 216 and sloped sidewalls 218A and 218B on the drain structure 218. In an embodiment, the sidewalls 216A, 216B, 218 A and 218B are inclined at approximately 60 degrees with respect to an uppermost surface of the first III-N material 202. In the illustrative embodiment, upper surfaces of the source structure 216 and the drain structure 218 become corrugated as a result of the epitaxial growth process. In an embodiment, the corrugation is between 5nm-10nm.

In an embodiment, the lateral epitaxial overgrowth causes portions of the source structure 216 and drain structure 218 to come into contact with the 2DEG (205) under the interface 207 between the polarization charge inducing layer 204 and the first III-N material 202, as shown in Figure 4B.

The cross-sectional illustration of Figure 5C, taken along a direction B-B' of the plan view illustration of Figure 4A shows epitaxially grown sidewalls 216C and 216D of the source structure 216. Sidewalls 216C and 216D, are grown to contact with the 2DEG 205 at the interface 207 between the polarization charge inducing layer 204 and the first III-N material 202. Figure 4C represents an embodiment of the source structure 216 having sidewalls that do not meet at an apex. In the illustrated example, the sidewalls 216C and 216D do not merge because of the height, HE, to which the source structure 216 is formed and the angle of the incline of the sidewalls 216C and 216D. In one example, when the fins 202B have a width, WF, that are at least lOOnm, the source structure is growth to a height, HE between 30nm-60nm as measured from an upper surface of the polarization charge inducing layer 204, the sidewalls 216C and 216D do not merge. Unmerged sidewalls 216C and 216D result in a gap, Gs. Extending the epitaxial overgrowth process may cause sidewalls 216C and 216D to reduce the gap, Gs. In an embodiment the gap, Gs, may be reduced to approximately 5nm-10nm. Having a smaller gap, Gs, may be advantageous in increasing the effective surface area of the source structure 216. The source structure 216 also has an uppermost surface 216E that is corrugated, where the corrugation is between 5nm-20nm.

In an embodiment, when the height HE of the source structure 216 is approximately equal to the fin width, WF, and when the sidewalls 216C and 216D each have an angle of

approximately 60 degrees, the lateral epitaxial process can cause sidewalls of the source structure 216 to merge at an apex such as is depicted above in the cross-sectional illustration of the source structure 108 in Figure 1C. In a further embodiment, the further extending the LEO process can cause the sidewalls 216C and 216D to merge at an apex as well as merge on the isolation layer surface 21 OA, resulting in a source structure that similar to the source structure 108 depicted above in the cross-sectional illustration of Figure ID.

Figures 5A and 5C illustrate plan view and cross-sectional views, of the structures of Figure 4 A and 4B, respectively, following the removal of the mask 214 and deposition of a dielectric layer 220 on the source structure 216, drain structure 218 and on the polarization charge inducing layer 204 and on the isolation layer 210. In one embodiment, when the dielectric layer 220 includes a material that is the same or substantially the same as the material of the mask 214, the mask 214 is not removed prior to deposition of the dielectric layer 220. In some examples, the dielectric layer 220 is blanket deposited and then planarized for subsequent processing.

Figures 6A and 6B illustrates a plan view and a cross-sectional view, respectively, of the structure of Figure 5 A and 5B, respectively, following the formation of a gate opening 221 in the dielectric layer 220 over a portion of the polarization charge inducing layer 204. Referring to Figure 6B, in an embodiment, a photoresist mask (not shown) is patterned over the dielectric layer 220, where the pattern defines a location for an opening to be formed relative to the polarization charge inducing layer 204. In one embodiment, a plasma etch process is utilized to form the opening 221 in the dielectric layer 220, selectively to the underlying polarization charge inducing layer 204. In the exemplary embodiment, the gate opening 221 exposes a portion of the isolation layer 210 as shown in the plan view illustration of Figure 5 A. In an embodiment, gate opening 221 has a width, at the bottom of the opening, WB, that is approximately between 50nm-500nm as shown in the cross-sectional illustration of Figure 5B.

Figure 7A and 7B illustrate a plan view and a cross-sectional view, respectively, of the structure of Figures 6A and 6B, respectively, following the formation of a gate 222 in the gate opening 221 and on a portion of the polarization charge inducing layer 204. Referring to Figure 7B, in an embodiment, a gate dielectric layer 222A is first blanket deposited on a portion of the polarization charge inducing layer 204 exposed by the gate opening 221, and on the dielectric layer 220. The gate dielectric layer 222A is also disposed on sidewalls of the dielectric layer 220 in the gate opening 221. Suitable materials and thicknesses for the gate dielectric layer 222A are same as or substantially the same as the material and thicknesses of the gate dielectric layer 106A. In an embodiment, the gate dielectric layer 222A, is formed by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process or a PVD process. A gate electrode layer 222B is then blanket deposited on the gate dielectric layer 222 A in the gate opening 221. Examples of the gate electrode layer 222B include a material that is the same as or substantially the same as the material of the gate electrode layer 106B described in association with Figure IF. After deposition of the gate dielectric layer 222A and the gate electrode layer 222B, a planarization process is performed to remove the gate dielectric layer 222A and the gate electrode layer 222B from an uppermost surface of the dielectric layer 220. In an embodiment, the planarization process includes a chemical mechanical polish process, where the CMP process forms a gate 222 having an uppermost surface that is co-planar or substantially co-planar with the uppermost surface of the dielectric layer 220 as shown in the cross-sectional illustration A-A taken along a direction A-A of the plan view illustration of Figure 2F.

Figure 8A and 8B illustrate a plan view and a cross-sectional view, respectively, of the structure of Figures 7A and 7B, respectively, following the formation of an opening 223 A such as a source contact opening, above the source structure 216 and an opening 223B such as a drain contact opening above the drain structure 218. Referring to Figure 8B, in an embodiment, a

photoresist mask (not shown) is patterned over the dielectric layer 220 and the gate 222, where the pattern defines a location for the opening 223 A and the opening 223B to be formed relative to the source structure 216 and the drain structure 218, respectively.

In one embodiment, a plasma etch process is utilized to form the opening 223 A and opening 223B in the dielectric layer 220, selectively to the underlying source structure 216 and the drain structure 218, respectively. The plasma etch may cause some corner rounding of the corrugate upper surfaces 216E and 218E.

In an embodiment, the opening 223 A exposes a portion of the source structure 216 and a portion of the isolation layer 210 laterally surrounding the source structure 216 as shown in the plan view illustration of Figure 8 A. In a different embodiment, the opening 223 A can be extended to expose a portion of the source structure sidewall 216C. In an embodiment, the opening 223 A can be large enough to expose an entire upper surface area of source structure 216.

Similarly, in the illustrated embodiment, the opening 223B exposes a portion of the drain structure 218 and a portion of the isolation layer 210 laterally surrounding the source structure 216 as shown in the plan view illustration of Figure 8 A. In a different embodiment, the opening 223B can be extended to expose a portion of the drain structure sidewall 216C as illustrated in Figure 8B. In a different embodiment, the opening 223B can be large enough to expose an entire upper surface area of drain structure 218.

In an embodiment, the plasma etch process undergoes a clean-up process in order to completely expose the upper surfaces of the source structure 216 and the drain structure 218. In one such embodiment, the plasma etch completely removes the dielectric layer 220 from the region between the source structure 216 and from the region between the drain structure 218 to expose the underlying isolation layer 210 as illustrated in the plan view illustration of Figure 8 A. In some embodiments, significant over etch can result in exposure of sidewalls of the patterned first III-N material 202 under sidewalls 216A and 218A of the source structure 216 and drain structure 218, respectively.

Figures 9A and 9B illustrate a plan view and a cross-sectional view, respectively, of the structure of Figures 8 A and 8B, respectively, following the formation of a drain contact 226 in the drain contact opening 223B on the drain structure 218 and a source contact 228 in the source contact opening 223 A on the source structure 216.

Referring to Figure 9B in an embodiment, one or more layers of contact metal are deposited inside each of the openings 223 A and 223B on the surface of the source structure 216 and on the surface of the drain structure 218, respectively. In the illustrative embodiment, the one or more layers of the contact metal are also blanket deposited on exposed portions of the

isolation layer 210 and on the uppermost surface of the dielectric layer 220 and on the gate 222. In an embodiment, the one or more layers of contact metal are deposited using a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or an ALD process. In an embodiment, suitable contact metals include metals such as but not limited to Ti, Al or Ni. In an embodiment, a tungsten capping layer is deposited on the one or more layers of contact metal. In an

embodiment, where the tungsten capping layer is deposited on the one or more layers of contact metal, the one or more layers of contact metal is first deposited on the bottom and on the sides of the opening 223 A and 223B and the tungsten capping layer is deposited to fill the remaining portion of the openings 223 A and 223B. In an embodiment, the one or more layers of contact metal is deposited to a thickness in the range of 10-30nm, and the tungsten capping layer is deposited to fill the remaining portion of each of the openings 223 A and 223B.

A planarization process is carried out to remove the one or more layers of contact metal from the uppermost surface of the dielectric layer 220. In one embodiment, the planarization process includes a chemical mechanical polish (CMP) process. The CMP process removes all the one or more layers of contact metal from the uppermost surfaces of the dielectric layer 220, and from the uppermost surface of the gate 222. The CMP process leaves the one or more layers of contact metal in the openings 223 A and 223B to form a source contact 226 and a drain contact 228.

It is to be appreciated that maximizing a contact area between the source contact 226 and the source structure 216, formed over a plurality of fins, can help to reduce the contact resistance between the source structure 216 and the source contact 226 by as much as 70% compared to a contact resistance between a source contact and a source structure formed over a large first single fin of a planar terminal structure having a central body and a large second single fin opposite to the large first single fin. It is to be appreciated that maximizing a contact area between the drain contact 228 and the drain structure 218, formed over a plurality of fins, can help to reduce the contact resistance between the drain contact 228 and the drain structure 218 by as much as 70% compared to a contact resistance between a drain contact and a drain structure, formed over the large second single fin of the planar terminal structure. In an embodiment, the contact resistance between the source contact 226 and the source structure 216 or between the drain contact 228 and the drain structure 216 can have a value of less than 200 ohm-micron.

Figure 10 illustrates a system 1000 in which a mobile computing platform 1005 and/or a data server machine 1006 employs an IC including at least one III-N transistor, such as the device 100 including an epitaxially grown source and drain structures, formed on a backbone of fin like structures, where the source and drain structures have surface areas that offer a large contact area for a given footprint of the fin like structure, in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure. The server machine 1006 may be any commercial server, for example including any number of high-performance computing platforms disposed within a rack and networked together for electronic data processing, which in the exemplary embodiment includes a packaged monolithic IC 1050. The mobile computing platform 1005 may be any portable device configured for each of electronic data display, electronic data processing, wireless electronic data transmission, or the like. For example, the mobile computing platform 1005 may be any of a tablet, a smart phone, laptop computer, etc., and may include a display screen (e.g., a capacitive, inductive, resistive, or optical touchscreen), a chip-level or package-level integrated system 1010, and a battery 1015.

Whether disposed within the integrated system 1010 illustrated in the expanded view

1020, or as a stand-alone packaged chip within the server machine 1006, packaged monolithic IC 1050 includes a memory chip (e.g., RAM), or a processor chip (e.g., a microprocessor, a multi-core microprocessor, graphics processor, or the like) including at least one III-N transistor, such as the device 100 including an epi taxi ally grown source and drain structures formed on a backbone of fin like structures, for example as describe elsewhere herein. The monolithic IC 1050 may be further coupled to a board, a substrate, or an interposer 1060 along with, one or more of a power management integrated circuit (PMIC) 1030, RF (wireless) integrated circuit (RFIC) 1025 including a wideband RF (wireless) transmitter and/or receiver (TX/RX) (e.g., including a digital baseband and an analog front end module further comprises a power amplifier on a transmit path and a low noise amplifier on a receive path), and a controller thereof 1035.

Functionally, PMIC 1030 may perform battery power regulation, DC-to-DC conversion, etc., and so has an input coupled to battery 1015 and with an output providing a current supply to other functional modules. As further illustrated, in the exemplary embodiment, RFIC 1025 has an output coupled to an antenna (not shown) to implement any of a number of wireless standards or protocols, including but not limited to Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11 family), WiMAX (IEEE 802.16 family), IEEE 802.20, long term evolution (LTE), Ev-DO, HSPA+, HSDPA+, HSUPA+, EDGE, GSM, GPRS, CDMA, TDMA, DECT, Bluetooth, derivatives thereof, as well as any other wireless protocols that are designated as 3G, 4G, 5G, and beyond. In alternative

implementations, each of these board-level modules may be integrated onto separate ICs coupled to the package substrate of the monolithic IC 1050 or within a single IC coupled to the package substrate of the monolithic IC 1050.

Figure 11 is a functional block diagram of a computing device 1100, arranged in accordance with at least some implementations of the present disclosure. Computing device 1100 may be found inside platform 1000, for example, and further includes a motherboard 1102 hosting a number of components, such as but not limited to a processor 1101 (e.g., an

applications processor) and one or more communications chips 1104, 1105. Processor 1101 may be physically and/or electrically coupled to motherboard 1102. In some examples, processor 1101 includes an integrated circuit die packaged within the processor 1101. In general, the term "processor" may refer to any device or portion of a device that processes electronic data from registers and/or memory to transform that electronic data into other electronic data that may be stored in registers and/or memory. A device or component of computing device 1100 may include transistor(s) or transistor structure(s) such as III-N devices 100 including a terminal structure having a central body and a first plurality of fins, and a second plurality of fins, opposite the first plurality of fins integrated with or without silicon CMOS transistors.

In various examples, one or more communication chips 1104, 1105 may also be physically and/or electrically coupled to the motherboard 1102. In further implementations, communication chips 1104 may be part of processor 1101. Depending on its applications, computing device 1100 may include other components that may or may not be physically and electrically coupled to motherboard 1102. These other components may include, but are not limited to, volatile memory (e.g., DRAM) 1107, 1108, non-volatile memory (e.g., ROM) 1110, a graphics processor 1112, flash memory, global positioning system (GPS) device 1113, compass 1114, a chipset 1106, an antenna 1116, a power amplifier 1109, a touchscreen controller 1111, a touchscreen display 1117, a speaker 1115, a camera 1103, and a battery 1118, as illustrated, and other components such as a digital signal processor, a crypto processor, an audio codec, a video codec, an accelerometer, a gyroscope, and a mass storage device (such as hard disk drive, solid state drive (SSD), compact disk (CD), digital versatile disk (DVD), and so forth), or the like.

Communication chips 1104, 1105 may enables wireless communications for the transfer of data to and from the computing device 1100. The term "wireless" and its derivatives may be used to describe circuits, devices, systems, methods, techniques, communications channels, etc., that may communicate data through the use of modulated electromagnetic radiation through a non-solid medium. The term does not imply that the associated devices do not contain any wires, although in some embodiments they might not. Communication chips 1104, 1105 may implement any of a number of wireless standards or protocols, including but not limited to those described elsewhere herein. As discussed, computing device 1100 may include a plurality of communication chips 1104, 1105. For example, a first communication chip may be dedicated to shorter range wireless communications such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth and a second

communication chip may be dedicated to longer range wireless communications such as GPS, EDGE, GPRS, CDMA, WiMAX, LTE, Ev-DO, and others.

In various implementations, the computing device 1100 may be a laptop, a netbook, a notebook, a smartphone, a tablet, a personal digital assistant (PDA), an ultra-mobile PC, a mobile phone, a desktop computer, a server, a printer, a scanner, a monitor, a set-top box, an entertainment control unit, a digital camera, a portable music player, a digital video recorder, or any other electronic device that processes data or employs one or more integrated circuit structures or devices formed using the disclosed techniques, as variously described herein.

Figure 12 illustrates an integrated circuit structure 1200 that includes one or more embodiments of the disclosure. The integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200 is an intervening structure used to bridge a first substrate 1202 to a second substrate 1204. The first substrate 1202 may be, for instance, an integrated circuit die. The second substrate 1204 may be, for instance, a memory module, a computer mother, or another integrated circuit die. The integrated circuit die may include one or more devices such as a III-N device 100 (transistor) including a terminal structure having a central body and a first plurality of fins, and a second plurality of fins, opposite the first plurality of fins, and source and drain structures on respective first and second plurality of fins, where the source and drain structures are designed for enhanced contact surface area and reducing contact resistance, for example. Generally, the purpose of an integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200 is to spread a connection to a wider pitch or to reroute a connection to a different connection. For example, an integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200 may couple an integrated circuit die to a ball grid array (BGA) 1211 that can subsequently be coupled to the second substrate 1204. In some embodiments, the first and second substrates 1202/1204 are attached to opposing sides of the integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200. In other

embodiments, the first and second substrates 1202/1204 are attached to the same side of the integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200. And in further embodiments, three or more substrates are interconnected by way of the integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200.

The integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200 may be formed of an epoxy resin, a fiberglass-reinforced epoxy resin, a ceramic material, or a polymer material such as polyimide. In further implementations, the integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200 may be formed of alternate rigid or flexible materials that may include the same materials described above for use in a

semiconductor substrate, such as silicon, germanium, and other group III-N, group III-V and group IV materials.

The integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200 may include metal interconnects 1208 and via 1210, including but not limited to through-silicon vias (TSVs) 1210. The integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200 may further include embedded devices 1214, including both passive and active devices. Such devices include, but are not limited to, capacitors, decoupling capacitors, resistors, inductors, fuses, diodes, transformers, III-N transistors such as a III-N device 100 including a terminal structure having a central body and a first plurality of fins, and a second plurality of fins, opposite the first plurality of fins, one or more magnetic tunnel junction or resistive

random-access devices, sensors, and electrostatic discharge (ESD) devices. More complex devices such as radio-frequency (RF) devices, power amplifiers, power management devices, antennas, arrays, sensors, and MEMS devices may also be formed on the integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200. In accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure, apparatuses or processes disclosed herein may be used in the fabrication of integrated circuit (IC) structure 1200.

Thus, embodiments of the present disclosure include group Ill-Nitride (III-N) devices with reduced contact resistance and their methods of fabrication.

In first examples, a device includes a terminal structure having a first group Ill-Nitride (III-N) material, a central body and a first plurality of fins, and a second plurality of fins, opposite the first plurality of fins, a polarization charge inducing layer above the terminal structure, where the polarization charge inducing layer including a second III-N material, a gate electrode above the polarization charge inducing layer, a source structure on the polarization charge inducing layer above a second portion of the central body and on sidewalls of the first plurality of fins, wherein the source structure includes a third III-N material, a drain structure on the polarization charge inducing layer above a third portion of the central body and on sidewalls of the second plurality of fins, wherein the drain structure includes the third III-N material, a source contact on the source structure and a drain contact on the first and second portions of the drain structure.

In second examples, for any of first examples, each fin in the first or the second plurality of fins has a width between lOOnm - 500nm and a length between 0.5 micrometer and 1 micrometer.

In third examples, for any of the first through second examples, a spacing between each successive fin in the first or the second plurality of fins is less than the width of the fin.

In fourth examples, for any of the first through third examples, the number of fins in the first and the second plurality of fins is between 2-1000.

In sixth examples, for any of the first through fifth examples, the source contact has an area of contact on the source structure, wherein the area of contact has a first dimension that is greater than a combined width of the first plurality of fins and a combined width of spacing between the first plurality of fins and, wherein the source contact has a second dimension that is approximately equal to a length of the first plurality of fins.

In seventh examples, for any of the first through sixth examples, the drain contact has an area of contact on the drain structure, wherein the area of contact has a first dimension that is greater than a combined width of the second plurality of fins and a combined width of spacing between the second plurality of fins and, wherein the drain contact has a second dimension that is

approximately equal to a length of the second plurality of fins.

In eighth examples, for any of the first through seventh examples, the source structure covers an interface between the polarization charge inducing layer and the first III-N material, and the drain structure covers an interface between the polarization charge inducing layer and the first III-N semiconductor material.

In ninth examples, for any of the first through eighth examples, the source structure and a drain structure include of faceted crystals having sidewalls that are approximately 60 degrees with respect to an uppermost surface of the first or the second plurality of fins.

In tenth examples, for any of the first through ninth examples, the sidewalls intersect at an apex. In eleventh examples, for any of the first through tenth examples, the source structure and a drain structure each have an uppermost surface that is corrugated and wherein the corrugation is between 10nm-50nm.

In twelfth examples, for any of the first through eleventh examples, the first III-N material includes a gallium nitride (GaN) and the second III-N material includes a III-N material that includes aluminum.

In thirteenth examples, for any of the first through twelfth examples, the source structure and the drain structure each include a material that is lattice matched to the first III-N material.

In fourteenth examples, for any of the first through thirteenth examples, the impurity dopant includes an n-type impurity dopant.

In fifteenth examples, for any of the first through fourteenth examples the source structure and the drain structure each includes a III-N material having an indium content that increases from 1% to 10%.

In sixteenth examples, for any of the first through fifteenth examples, the device further includes a gate dielectric layer on the polarization charge inducing layer.

In seventeenth examples, for any of the first through sixteenth examples, the gate electrode comprises a work function layer and a gate metal cap.

In eighteenth examples, a method of fabricating a semiconductor structure includes forming a layer including a first group Ill-nitride (III-N) material on a substrate and forming a polarization charge inducing layer including a second III-N material above the first layer. The method further includes patterning the layer including the first III-N material and the polarization charge inducing layer and forming a central body, a first plurality of fins adjacent to a first side of the central body, and a second plurality of fins adjacent to a second side of the central body, opposite the first side. The method further includes forming an isolation layer between the first plurality of fins and between the second plurality of fins and forming a source structure in the first recess and a drain structure in the second recess. The method further includes forming a gate dielectric layer on the polarization charge inducing layer and forming a gate electrode on the gate dielectric layer. The method further includes forming a source contact on the source structure and a drain contact on the drain structure.

In nineteenth examples, for any of eighteenth examples, the method of forming the isolation layer includes depositing an electrically insulating layer on the patterned polarization charge inducing layer, between the first and the second plurality of fins and on the layer including the first III-N material between the first and the second plurality of fins. The method further includes planarizing the electrically insulating layer and removing it from an uppermost surface of the polarization charge inducing layer and recessing the electrically insulating layer by a wet chemical technique, wherein the recessing exposes an upper portion of the first III-N material.

In twentieth examples, for any of the eighteenth through nineteenth examples, the method of forming the source structure includes forming a mask structure on a portion of the central body, the forming separating a first portion of a central body from a second portion of the central body. The method further includes growing a third III-N material on the first plurality of fins and on the first portion of the central body and forming the drain structure includes growing the third III-N material on the second plurality of fins and on the second portion of the central body, wherein the process of growing leads to the formation of crystal structures with slanted sidewalls.

In twenty first examples, for any of the for any of the eighteenth through twentieth examples, the process of growing the third III-N material includes growing to merge the slanted sidewalls to form an apex.

In twenty second examples, for any of the for any of the eighteenth through twentieth twenty first examples, the process of growing the third III-N material further includes forming the third III-N material on portions of exposed sidewalls of the patterned polarization charge inducing layer and the first III-N material.

In twenty third examples, a system includes a processor and a radio transceiver coupled to the processor, wherein the radio transceiver includes a transistor. The transistor includes a terminal structure having a first group Ill-Nitride (III-N) material, a central body and a first plurality of fins, and a second plurality of fins, opposite the first plurality of fins, a polarization charge inducing layer above the terminal structure, where the polarization charge inducing layer including a second III-N material, a gate electrode above the polarization charge inducing layer, a source structure on the polarization charge inducing layer above a second portion of the central body and on sidewalls of the first plurality of fins, wherein the source structure includes a third III-N material, a drain structure on the polarization charge inducing layer above a third portion of the central body and on sidewalls of the second plurality of fins, wherein the drain structure includes the third III-N material, a source contact on the source structure and a drain contact on the first and second portions of the drain structure.

In twenty fourth examples, for any of the twenty third examples, the number of fins in the first and the second plurality of fins is between 2-1000.

In twenty fifth examples, for any of the twenty third through twenty fourth examples, the source contact has an area of contact on the source structure. The area of contact has a first dimension that is greater than a combined width of the first plurality of fins and a combined width of spacing between the first plurality of fins and the source contact has a second dimension that is approximately equal to the length of the first plurality of fins and further where the drain contact also has an area of contact on the drain structure, where the area of contact has a first dimension that is greater than a combined width of the second plurality of fins and a combined width of spacing between the second plurality of fins and, where the drain contact has a second dimension that is approximately equal to a length of the second plurality of fins.