Certains contenus de cette application ne sont pas disponibles pour le moment.
Si cette situation persiste, veuillez nous contacter àObservations et contact
1. (WO2019033204) JEU DE PUZZLE BASÉ SUR DES SYMBOLES
Note: Texte fondé sur des processus automatiques de reconnaissance optique de caractères. Seule la version PDF a une valeur juridique

SYMBOL-BASED PUZZLE GAME

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present specification relates generally to puzzle games, and more particularly to a symbol-based puzzle game where the user solves the puzzle by filling puzzle boxes with pre-selected symbols.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Various symbol-based puzzle games have been known since antiquity, and more recently, popularity of these games (e.g. Sudoku) has ebbed and flowed over time. Such games are popular as they are generally easy to play, requiring merely a layout and a writing instrument, while providing varying degrees of challenge depend on the game and format.

[0003] However, it would be desirable to make these puzzle games more interesting by providing an overarching theme which is integrated into the puzzle solution. Additionally, the ability to modify the game layout, either independently or in accordance with a theme, may also provide a new experience for veteran players or existing formats. Finally, in both cases, the ability to moderate or increase the challenge of solving the puzzle should also be provided.

[0004] Accordingly, there remains a need for improvements in the art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0005] In accordance with an aspect of the invention, there is provided a symbol-based puzzle game where the user solves the puzzle by filling puzzle boxes with pre-selected symbols.

[0006] According to an embodiment of the invention, there is provided a symbol-based puzzle, comprising: a primary grid, formed from two overlapping squares to form a rectangular set of columns and lines; a plurality of secondary grids, each secondary grid being formed from a square set of puzzle boxes, the secondary grids laid out inside the primary grid such that each secondary grid is connected to at least one other secondary grid by at least one puzzle box and such that at least a portion of the primary grid remains uncovered by any secondary grids; and a pre-selected set of symbols, the number of preselected symbols equal to the number of puzzle boxes in one secondary grid; wherein the puzzle is solved by filling in each puzzle box with a symbol from the pre-selected set of symbols such that no symbol appears twice in any column of the primary grid, any line of the primary grid and in any secondary grid.

[0007] According to a further embodiment of the invention, the symbols may be selected based on the thematic elements for the puzzle. Further, phrases related to the thematic element may be formed within the primary grid upon solving the puzzle.

[0008] Other aspects and features according to the present application will become apparent to those ordinarily skilled in the art upon review of the following description of embodiments of the invention in conjunction with the accompanying figures.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0009] Reference will now be made to the accompanying drawings which show, by way of example only, embodiments of the invention, and how they may be carried into effect, and in which:

[0010] Figure 1 is a 16x29 puzzle layout according to an embodiment;

[0011] Figure 2 is a 16x31 puzzle layout according to an embodiment;

[0012] Figure 3 is a 25x45 puzzle layout according to an embodiment; and

[0013] Figure 4 is a 27x47 puzzle layout according to an embodiment.

[0014] Like reference numerals indicate like or corresponding elements in the drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

[0015] The present invention relates generally to puzzle games, and more particularly to a symbol-based puzzle game where the user solves the puzzle by filling puzzle boxes with pre-selected symbols.

[0016] According to an embodiment as shown in Figure 1 , the puzzle game 100 is based on a primary grid 110, which is defined by two overlapping squares to form a number of columns and lines. Preferably, the number of columns and lines on one side is a square number, such as 16, 25 or 36, but the final number of columns and lines need not be a square number nor to be equal. The primary grid determines the overall puzzle layout. For example, in Figure 1 , the primary grid is a 16x29 rectangle, defined by two overlapping squares of 16x16, with a three-line overlap.

[0017] Within the primary grid are a plurality of secondary grids 120, with each secondary grid defined as a set of puzzle boxes 130 laid out in a square shape, and the number of boxes 130 in each secondary grid 120 preferably equal to one of the number of lines and columns in the primary grid 110. For example, in Figure 1 , for a 16x29 primary grid 110, each secondary grid 120 is a 4x4 square of 16 puzzle boxes 130.

[0018] Each potential box in the primary grid 110 may be further denoted by a positional identifier based on enumerating the column and lines. For example, the columns may be labeled with lowercase letters a-y, and lines by numerals 1 -25, such that each space may be identified by a column/line combination such as a2 or q17. Alternatively as shown in Figure 1 , lines may be defined by a number-letter combination (1 a-2c, as shown) and columns by the letter-number combination (a1 -b6, as shown). The position any puzzle box may be given by the line/column combination, such as 2c, a4 for puzzle box 130 as indicated in Figure 1

[0019] Each secondary grid 120 is positioned fully within the primary grid 110 such that each secondary grid 120 is connected to at least one other secondary grid 120 by at least one puzzle square. The layout of the secondary grids 120 is also such that at least a portion of the primary grid 110 remains uncovered by any secondary grids 120. The layout of the secondary grids 120 may be symmetrical or asymmetrical, as desired. Additionally, to produce certain patterns of secondary grids 120, each secondary grid 120 may be further limited to contact with no more than three other secondary grids 120.

[0020] The user then completes the puzzle 100 by filling in each of the puzzle boxes 130 with a symbol 140, where the number of unique symbols 140 is equal to the number of puzzle boxes 130 in each secondary grid 120. For example, as shown in Figure 1 , the symbols are a combination of letters and numbers, namely the consonants B,Q,R,T, the vowels A and O, and the numbers 1 -9 and 0. Each secondary grid must be filled with one of each symbol, such that no symbol is repeated across any line or column of the primary grid 110, or within any given secondary grid 120.

[0021] In order to determine which symbols 140 to place, the user may be provided with some puzzle boxes 130 pre-filled with symbols 140, the number of pre-filled boxes required being determined by the size of the primary grid 110 and the number and location of the secondary grids 120.

[0022] In another embodiment, as shown in Figure 2, the puzzle 200 (a 16x31 layout formed by overlapping 16x16 squares) may have an underlying thematic element. As shown in Figure 2, the thematic element is countries and their year of independence (in French language). Thus, the secondary grids 120 are positioned and the symbols 140

selected such that one or more recognizable phrase (e.g. words or patterns) related to the thematic element may be formed within the primary grid 110, either along a line or column, or diagonally. The nature of the phrase by may be hinted to the user by providing a relevant title for the puzzle as shown, or providing clues associated with the spaces of the primary grid 110, somewhat similarly to a crossword puzzle. Phrases may also be broken across multiple secondary grids 120, although an indication of such should be presented to the user to assist in solving the puzzle 100.

[0023] In may be possible, particularly when using phrases as the basis for generating the puzzle, that a duplicate symbol would be required within a secondary grid 120. In this case, one of the duplicate symbols may be replaced by a placeholder symbol 150, to maintain the limitations of the puzzle. The location of the placeholder symbol 150 on the primary grid 110 and the corresponding symbol should be indicated to the user via a legend or similar notation near the puzzle as shown. Placeholder symbols 150 may also be used for elements of compound words, such as spaces or hyphens, when such compound words are used as phrases.

[0024] The location of the phrases may be further indicated by highlighting the puzzle boxes 130 which contain the phrases in the completed puzzle. This highlighting may be done by changing the color of the puzzle boxes 130, by bolding sections of the primary grid 110 or one or more secondary grids 120, or other methods as known in the art of puzzles.

[0025] It may be noted that each puzzle 100 should have a solution, although the solution may be non-unique, given the nature of symbol-based logic puzzles.

[0026] For ease of presentation and reproduction, the use of alphanumeric symbols (uppercase and lowercase letters A-Z, numerals 1 -0) for the pre-selected symbols is recommended, although other symbols may be used, depending on the nature of the puzzle and the puzzle's creator. Other potential symbols include ASCII characters, extended ASCII characters, and emojis, among others.

[0027] Additionally the selected phrases for the puzzle may be in any language desired, although an indication of the language used should be provided to the user with the hints.

[0028] Puzzle 100 may be generated by starting from a primary grid 110 and an arrangement of secondary grids 120, and selecting the appropriate number and layout of symbols 140 from there. Alternatively, a theme may be selected, related phrases determined, and the appropriate number and type of symbols 130 identified, and then the primary grid 110 and layout of secondary grids 120 from that. In either case, the final solution layout with all symbols 140 placed in all puzzle squares 130 may be hand-generated or, preferably, computer generated.

[0029] Figure 3 is an example of a thematically based puzzle 300 (air travel), with a 25x45 puzzle layout based on overlapping 25x25 squares. Figure 4 is another example of a thematically based puzzle 400 (famous people and their age), which has phrases that incorporated by alphabetical and numerical symbols. Figure 4 uses a 27x47 layout, based on overlapping 27x27 squares.

[0030] The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. Certain adaptations and modifications of the invention will be obvious to those skilled in the art. Therefore, the presently discussed embodiments are considered to be illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims rather than the foregoing description and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are therefore intended to be embraced therein.