Traitement en cours

Veuillez attendre...

Paramétrages

Paramétrages

Aller à Demande

1. WO1992017626 - SYNTHESE ELECTROCHIMIQUE DE SELS DE DIARYLIODONIUM

Note: Texte fondé sur des processus automatiques de reconnaissance optique de caractères. Seule la version PDF a une valeur juridique

[ EN ]

ELECTROCHEMICAL SYNTHESIS OF DIARYLIODONIUM SALTS

Field of Invention
The present invention concerns electrochemical preparation of diaryliodonium salts by use of a carbon anode in a single or undivided electrolytic compartment or cell.

Background of the Invention
The electrochemical formation of diaryliodonium salts is known for benzene plus iodobenzene (see endt: H. Hoffelner, H. . Lorch, H. Wendt, Journal of
Electroanalytical Chemistry, 66 (1975) , pp. 183-194) and toluene plus iodobenzene (see Miller: Larry L. Miller, A. K. Hoffman, JACS, 8 (1967), pp. 593-597) using platinum electrodes, divided cells, acetonitrile solvent and perchlorate electrolyte. In both cases these do not represent commercially feasible sets of conditions.
Divided cells are more expensive to operate due to additional voltage drop in the cell. Platinum is too expensive for anode material on a commercial scale. In addition, there is no report of a regioselective system in this prior art which can be important for some applications.
Other prior art of interest includes U.S. Patent

4,759,833 which discloses the simultaneous preparation of a diaryliodonium salt and an alkoxide salt using a divided cell. The only anode taught in this patent is platinum.
Diaryliodonium salts have a variety of uses such as photoinitiators (U.S. Patents 4,136,102 and 3,981,897), fungicides (U.S. Patents 3,944,498 and 3,763,187) and bactericides (U.S. Patents 3,885,036 and 3,712,920). Thus, it would be desirable to have a more economically and industrially feasible process for preparing such compounds .

Summary of the Invention
The present invention is directed to an
electrolytic process for the preparation of a
diaryliodonium salt comprising
(A) charging an electrolytic cell fitted with a carbon anode and a cathode in a single compartment with a reaction mixture comprising an iodoaryl compound, an aryl compound, a stable electrolyte, and a
solvent, and
(B) applying an electric potential to the cathode and anode under conditions to promote formation of the desired diaryliodonium salt product.

Detailed Description of the Invention
The iodoaryl compound employed as a starting material in the process of the present invention is a heterocyclic or preferably a carbocyclic aromatic compound containing 6 to 11 carbon atoms. It is also possible that the iodoaryl compound can be substituted with groups such as halides, alkyl groups having 1 to 12 carbon atoms, vinyl groups, carboxylic acids or esters, ethers and the like. Preferred iodoaryl compounds include iodotoluene, iodobenzene, iodonaphthalene, iodobenzene substituted with 1 to 5 substituents
independently selected from —R, -OR, and

—C—O—R wherein R is an alkyl group of 1 to 12 carbon atoms, and the like.
The aryl compound employed as a starting material in the process of the present invention is heterocyclic or preferably a carbocyclic aromatic compound containing 6 to 11 carbon atoms. The aryl compound of the
invention is distinguished from the iodoaryl compound of the invention in that the latter is substituted with iodine and the former compound is not. Preferred aryl compounds include benzene, toluene, naphthalene, or other polycyclic aromatic compounds. It is also
possible that the aryl compound can be substituted with groups such as halides (i.e., F, Br, or Cl) , alkyl groups having 1 to 12 carbon atoms, vinyl groups, carboxylic acids or esters, ethers, and the like.
In general, the optional substituents on the aryl and iodoaryl compounds can be any group or groups that do not have substantial adverse effects on preparation of the desired diaryliodonium compound.
The method of the invention is conducted using a solvent for the iodoaryl compound, aryl compound and electrolyte. The solvent can be selected from the group consisting of polar solvents, and preferably acyclic polar solvents. Examples of solvents suitable for use with the present invention are alcohols such as
methanol, halogenated hydrocarbons such as dichloro— methane and chloroform, acetonitrile, organic acids, and the like. The most preferred solvent is acetic acid.
The electrolyte for use in the process of the present invention is one which will conduct an electric current and not have substantial adverse effects on preparation of the desired diaryliodonium compound.
Also, the electrolyte can function partially or totally as the reaction solvent. Examples of suitable
electrolytes include strong acids such as p—toluene— sulfonic acid and, preferably, sulfuric acid. Other useful electrolytes include organic salts.
The organic salts which can be employed as an electrolyte in the electrolytic process of the present invention are preferably . alkali and tetraalkylammonium salts of weak organic acids. However, stronger organic acids may also be utilized. Examples of suitable salts are the sodium, potassium, lithium and (C,-C12) tetraalkyl ammonium salts of acetic acid, trihaloacetic acid, p-toluenesulfonic acid, IH, BrH, F4BH and
benzenesulfonic acid, among others.
It has been found that use of compounds of fluorine as electrolyte leads to increased regioselectivity for the para, para' isomers (where possible) of the diaryliodonium salt product.
Preferred electrolytes are compounds of fluorine, sulfuric acid or a combination thereof. Examples of compounds of fluorine include NH3HF and HF. It is preferred that HF is used in combination with a minor amount of H2S04.
It is important to use an electrolyte that is stable (i.e., unreactive) under the conditions of the electrolytic process. For example, use of electrolytes that have a Cl atom, such as NaCl or C1S03H, will typically result in unwanted production of Cl2 (easier to oxidize) and little or none of the desired product.
The electrolyte and/or solvent must be capable of contributing a negative ion as the counter ion of the diaryliodonium compound in order to have a salt of said compound. Typical salts include, for example, sulfates, halides such as fluorides, acetates, phosphates, and the like. It may be desirable, after performing the
synthesis process of the invention, to perform an ion exchange for the anion for purposes of, for example, improved solubility or end use efficacy (e.g., enhanced biocide activity) . An example of such an ion exchange is exchanging a sulfate ion with an iodide or chloride ion.
The process of the invention is carried out in an undivided or single compartment electrolytic cell equipped with a cathode and anode. Use of an undivided cell is more economical than use of a divided cell.

The nature of the anode for use in the process of the invention is important to achieve increased current efficiency. The anode is comprised of, or preferably consists essentially of, carbon. The form of the carbon anode is not particularly critical. Thus, the anode can be carbon felt, vitreous or glassy carbon, graphitic carbon, or carbon cloth. Graphitic carbon is preferred.

The nature of the cathode for use in the process of the invention has been found not to be particularly critical. Thus, the cathode can be comprised of zinc, platinum, nickel, cadmium, tin, copper, stainless steel, vanadium, carbon, and the like. Preferred is carbon.
The reaction mixture for the process of the present invention preferably contains a minor amount, for example about 1% to about 10%, based on the total weight of the reaction mixture, of a drying agent in order to remove any water present or generated during the
process.
Examples of drying agents include, for example, molecular sieves and organic acid anhydrides. When an organic acid is used as the reaction solvent, it is preferred that the drying agent is the anhydride
corresponding to the organic acid. Thus, when acetic acid is used as solvent, the preferred drying agent is acetic anhydride.
To perform the process of the invention, the single compartment is charged with the reactants, solvent and electrolyte in any order. An electric potential
preferably about 1.75 volts to 2.25 volts, more
preferably 1.85 volts to 2.15 volts is then applied to the anode and cathode. Electric potential as referred to herein is vs. SCE. The electric potential is
normally applied to the anode and the cathode for a period of time of about 2 hours to 10 hours, and
preferably about 5 hours to 7 hours. The reaction can be conducted under quite varied conditions. For
example, temperatures of about 25° to about 85°C, and preferably about 27° to about 65°C, and pressures of about 1 at to 10 atm (101.33 kPa to 1013.30 kPa) , and preferably about 1 atm to 5 atm (101.33 kPa* to 506.65 kPa) are typical. In general, solution electrical conductivity increases as temperature is raised from room temperature up to the boiling point of at least one of the reactants. In a particularly simple embodiment of the invention, the electric potential is applied to the anode and the cathode as a constant electric
potential.
The molar ratio of the iodoaryl compound: aryl compound is preferably about 40:1 to about 1:40, with about 10:1 to about 1:10 being preferred and about 1:1 to about 1:10 being more preferred.
The amount of electrolyte can vary widely since it can optionally be used as all or part of the solvent. For example, about 0.05% to about 99% electrolyte based on the total weight of the reaction mixture can be employed. When the electrolyte is not intended to function as solvent, a preferred amount of electrolyte is about 0.05% to about 5%.
The process of the present invention proceeds with excellent current efficiency. A typical current
efficiency is greater than about 50%, preferably greater than about 75%, and more preferably greater than about 95%.
If desired, the process of the present invention can be designed to result in increased regioselectivity for the para, para' (where applicable, i.e., where the iodoaryl moiety and aryl moiety are each mono-substituted) isomers. Such regioselectivity can be important for some applications such as where the diaryliodonium salt is used in a carbonylation process for preparing aromatic carboxylic acids and esters thereof (see U.S. Patent 4,759,833). As previously mentioned, use of a compound of fluorine has been identified as an important factor for achieving
increased para, para' regioselectivity. Thus, the mole ratio of the yield of para, para' substituted
product:ortho, para substituted product can be greater than about 5:1, in some cases greater than about 10:1 or even greater than about 20:1.
A preferred process of the invention can be
described as an electrolytic process for the preparation of a ditolyliodoniu fluoride comprising
(A) charging an electrolytic cell fitted with a carbon anode and a cathode in a single compartment with a reaction mixture comprising p—iodotoluene, toluene, an electrolyte consisting essentially NH3HF,
sulfuric acid, or a mixture thereof, a solvent
comprising acetic acid, and a drying agent
comprising acetic anhydride, and
(B) applying an electric potential to the cathode and anode under conditions to promote formation of the desired diaryliodonium salt product.
In the preferred process it is further preferred wherein said reaction mixture comprises about 0.5 to about 20 weight % p-iodotoluene, about 0.5 to about 20 weight % toluene, about 0.05 to about 5 weight % of the
electrolyte, about 50 to about 95 weight % acetic acid, and about 0.01 to about 10 weight % acetic anhydride, and wherein the electrolyte consists essentially of NH3HF or about 0.05 to about 5 weight % HF plus about 1 to about 10 weight % sulfuric acid.
The products produced by the present invention have at least one of the following uses: photoinitiators, chemical intermediates, pharmaceutical intermediates, thyromimeticε, growth hormones, fungicides, bactericides, or viricides.
The invention is further illustrated by the
following non—limiting examples. All percentages are by weight unless otherwise indicated.

Abbreviations
Abbreviations used in the following examples have the following meaning:
CE = current efficiency in percent
PP = para, para'
OP = ortho, para
HoAc = acetic acid
Ac20 = acetic anhydride
mm = millimeter
cm = centimeter
tol = tolyl
Et = ethyl
Bu = butyl
V = volt
vs. SCE = versus Saturated Calomel Electrode
A = amps
Xθ = negative counter ion such as HS04θ, Fθ, or
OAcθ

Experimental
All work was conducted with an Electrocell MP electrolysis cell. The unit has a 6—mm gap between 100 cm2 parallel planar electrodes. The turbulene promoters and entrance pieces assure full use of the electrode surface. The cell was operated in both batch and continuous modes. Flow was maintained with a variable speed, centrifugal, magnetically coupled, 304 stainless steel pump. A nitrogen blanket was maintained. The power source was capable of generating 0 to 60 volts at 0 to 8 amps. Coulombs were counted on a coulometer.

Contact surfaces were glass, stainless steel,
polypropylene, and electrode materials. The solvent was acetic acid with the additives as indicated. Analyses for iodonium salts isomeric purity was performed by liquid chromatograph vs. known standards.
Variables considered were:
1. Electrolytes and additives
2. Anode material
3. Current density
4. Temperature
5. Possible reduction of product

Effect of Electrolytes
In Table 1 the effects of supporting electrolyte and additives are shown. The results were very
dependent on the selected system. It was found that ditolyliodonium salts could be prepared in high para selectivity with good to excellent current efficiencies in acetic acid solvent with added sulfuric acid in the presence of added fluoride ion at carbon anodes in an undivided cell.

Effect of Anode Material
Table 2 compares the results at platinum and carbon anodes vs. the added salt. Both Wendt and Miller indicated the need for platinum anodes. It was found here that a carbon anode is superior to platinum and the anode of choice. Table 3 shows the results of the comparison of a wide range of anode materials. Carbon rods, carbon felt and vitreous carbon all gave good current efficiencies. It is interesting to note that the isomeric ratio is significantly affected by the anode material. Even within the carbon family, the carbon rod gave the most para product, vitreous carbon next and carbon felt the least. The various metallic anodes tested all gave about the same amount of para, para to ortho, para ratios with very poor current efficiencies. The superior role of graphite as an anode is especially remarkable.

Effect of Cathode Material
Since the electrolysis is conducted in an undivided cell and since hydrogen evolution is the only desired cathodic reaction, a low hydrogen overpotential cathode material is desired. Tables 4 and 5 show the results of various cathodes. Trials with various metals all eventually resulted in the fouling of the cathode. The fouling material was found to be a non—conductive metal iodide salt. The fouling material was difficult to remove and insoluble in acetic acid. The use of
graphite cathodes prevented fouling but raised the cell voltage slightly. No evidence was found for the
production of free iodine.

Effect of Current Density
Current density is a major factor in the capital cost of electrochemical production. It was found that current densities of 4 to 200 m A/cm2 produced iodonium salts. Above 200 m A/cm2 anode erosion is considered excessive. Lower current density was therefore
indicated and could be achieved by the use of expanded surface anodes (VCAR 60 porous graphite or
graphite felt) . This also resulted in improved
regioselectivity.

Effect of Temperature
Higher temperature is preferred if possible, because of increased solution conductivity. Solution electrical conductivity doubles as the temperature is raised from 27 to 65°C. Above 85°C toluene begins to boil off.

Effect of Reduction of the Oxidation Product
Cyclic voltammetry experiments were performed to see if iodonium salts reduce at the cathode. If such reduction occurs then it would be unlikely that the electrosynthesis of iodonium salts could be accomplished in an undivided cell. No reduction current was
observed.

Table 1
Preparation of Tol2IθXθ in Acetic Acid at Carbon Anode,
Undivided Cell; Carbon Cathode*
Supporting CE
Electrolyte Additives PP/OP
.25M Et4N+BF4 H2S04 14 69 10% C1S03H 6 0.9 3% CF3S03H 9 58 10% H2S04 2% Ac,0 8 75 10% H2S04 8 39 2% H2S04 2% Ac20 7 69 5% H2S04 .5M NH3HF 23 97 5% H2S04 .5M 48% HF 21 77 5% H2S04 .25M nBu4NθFθ 7 26 5% H2S04 2% Ac20 8 75 5% H,S0, 2% Ac,0/SMNH,HF 25 97

*A11 runs used 5.0 mm p-iodotoluene, 10.0 mmol toluene at 2.00 V vs. SCE.

Table 2




*A11 runs were made at 2.00 V vs. SCE in an undivided cell with 0.01 moles of p—iodotoluene.
**Carbon rod having a surface area of 10 cm2; platinum having a surface area of 10 cm2.

Table 3
Preparation of Tol2I®Xθ in Acetic Acid/5% H2S04/2% Ac20 in the Presence of Various Anodes with Carbon Cathode*
Anode PP/OP CE

C-rod (10 cm2)**
Carbon felt (30 cm2)
Vitreous carbon (8.6 cm2)
Carbon cloth
Type MA platinized titanium
(10 cm5)
Pt (10 cm2)
Lead dioxide (28 cm2)
Ebonex*** (20 cm2)
Pt/Ir (70%-30% on Ti)

*A11 runs used 5.0 mm p—iodotoluene, 10.0 mmol
toluene at 2.00 V vs. SCE in an undivided cell. **The number in cm2 following the description of
the anode is the surface area.
***Trademark of Ebonex Technologies, Emeryville, CA,
U.S.A.

Table 4
Preparation of Tol2IθXθ at Various Cathodes at
Carbon Felt Anode*
Cathode PP/OP CE



*A11 runs used HoAc solvent/5% H2S04, 2% Ac20 with .01 mole iodotoluene in an undivided cell at 2.00 V vs. SCE.
**The number in cm2 following the description of the cathode is the surface area.

Table 5
Preparation of Tol2IθXθ at Various Cathodes at
Carbon Rod Anode
Cathode PP/OP CE

Zn (17 cm2)** 2.4 85

Pt (10 cm2) 2.5 90

Ni (10 cm2) 2.2 95

Ebonex (29 cm2) 3.2 82 Cadmium Foil (12 cm2) 3.3 6.1

Tin Rod 4.5 65

Stainless Steel (75 cm2) 2.6 70

Vanadium Rod 1.8 75

Carbon Rod 8.3 75

*A11 runs used HoAc solvent, 5% H2S04, 2% Ac20 with .01 mole iodotoluene in an undivided cell at 2.00 vs. SCE.
**The number following the description in cm2 is the surface area.

It was felt that the carbon cloth example in
Table 3 was probably unsuccessful due to a lack of electrical connection to the carbon cloth. Therefore, the carbon cloth example was rerun and yielded a 78% current efficiency as determined by precipitation as the iodide salt followed by drying, and weighing.
The invention has been described in detail with particular reference to preferred embodiments thereof, but it will be understood that variations and
modifications can be effected within the spirit and scope of the invention.