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1. WO2011056742 - SURFACES D'APPAREILS DE CUISSON AYANT UNE CONFIGURATION PERMETTANT LA RETENUE DES DÉBORDEMENTS ET PROCÉDÉS DE FABRICATION DE CES SURFACES

Note: Texte fondé sur des processus automatiques de reconnaissance optique de caractères. Seule la version PDF a une valeur juridique

[ EN ]

COOKING APPLIANCE SURFACES HAVING SPILL CONTAINMENT PATTERN AND METHODS OF MAKING THE SAME

FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

[0001] The disclosure relates to appliances for cooking and baking, which have a spill containment pattern disposed thereon, and methods of making the same. More particularly, the disclosure is directed to a cooking appliance or cooking appliance surface that includes a spill containment pattern having a hydrophobic pattern bounding a non-hydrophobic spill containment region.

BACKGROUND

[0002] The surfaces of various cooking appliances including cooktops, range tops, stoves, and ovens can be subject to a variety of spills occurring during the cooking process. These spills must be contained and prevented from leaking over the edge of a cooking surface. In general, commercially available cooktops include a molded member or border encapsulating the edge of the cooktop to prevent spills from exiting the cooktop surface. However, such encapsulating member designs are difficult to clean and can trap food products and liquid between the cooking appliance surface and the encapsulating member. It can be further desirable to include a trim member surrounding the burner unit, as a means of directing spilled liquids away from the hot burner unit in order to prevent the spill from burning, drying out, and crusting on the burner area. However, such trim units also can result in the accumulation of trapped food or liquid products and are difficult to clean.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

[0003] In an embodiment of the present disclosure, a cooking appliance having a spill containment pattern includes a cooking appliance surface having a top surface, the top surface comprising a non-hydrophobic region, at least one heating element disposed on or adjacent to the cooking appliance surface, and a spill containment pattern comprising a hydrophobic pattern disposed on the top surface and bounding at least a portion of the non-hydrophobic region, the bounded non-hydrophobic region defining a non-hydrophobic spill containment region.

[0004] In another embodiment of the present disclosure, a cooking appliance surface having a spill containment pattern includes a top surface, the top surface comprising, wherein at least a portion of the top surface is adapted to be heated by a heating element, and a portion of the top surface is non-hydrophobic, and a spill containment pattern disposed on the top

surface, the spill containment patter comprising a hydrophobic pattern bounding at least a portion of the non-hydrophobic portion of the top surface, the bounded non-hydrophobic portion of the top surface defining a non-hydrophobic spill containment region.

[0005] In yet another embodiment of the present disclosure, a method of manufacturing a cooking appliance surface capable of containing spills thereon includes providing a cooking appliance surface comprising a top surface having a non-hydrophobic region, wherein at least a portion of the cooking appliance surface is adapted to be heated by at least one heating element, and forming a hydrophobic pattern on the top surface, the hydrophobic pattern arranged to bound at least a portion of the non-hydrophobic region, the bounded non-hydrophobic region defining a non-hydrophobic spill containment region.

[0006] These and other aspects, advantages and features of the disclosure will be more fully understood and appreciated by reference to the Description of the Preferred

Embodiments, and the appended drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0007] Preferred embodiments of the disclosure will now be described with reference to the drawings in which:

[0008] Figures 1 A and IB are plan views of a cooktop having a spill containment pattern with a hydrophobic pattern in the form of a frame-like border, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosure;

[0009] Figures 2A and 2B are plan views of a cooktop having a spill containment pattern with a hydrophobic pattern in the form of a grid pattern, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosure;

[0010] Figure 3 is a plan view of a cooktop having a spill containment pattern with a double frame-like border hydrophobic pattern, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosure;

[0011] Figure 4 is a plan view of a cooktop having a spill containment pattern having a hydrophobic pattern surrounding burner and control regions of the cooktop, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosure;

[0012] Figure 5 is a plan view of a cooktop having a spill containment pattern having a hydrophobic pattern surrounding burner, control, and fan regions of the cooktop, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosure;

[0013] Figure 6 is a top plan view of the bottom burner wall of an electric oven having a spill containment pattern in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosure; and

[0014] Figure 7 is a an isometric view of the side and bottom walls of an electric oven having a spill containment pattern with a hydrophobic pattern disposed on the angles and bends of the recessed bottom wall, in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0015] The present disclosure is directed to a cooking appliance surface having a spill containing pattern disposed on a top surface of the cooking appliance surface. The cooking appliance surface can include the surface of any appliance used for cooking and/or baking, such as, cooktops, stovetops, range cooking tops, and ovens. The cooking appliance surface of the disclosure can be adapted for use with any commercially available cooktop, stove, range, oven, or any similar such appliance. The cooking appliance surface can be any shape, including, for example, a rectangle, a lazy s-shape, and an oval. Certain embodiments are especially advantageous for use with cooktops that include a glass or ceramic top surface with burners disposed beneath the top surface and one or more controls disposed on or adjacent to the top surface. At least a portion of the top surface of the cooking appliance surface is adapted to be heated by at least one heating element. For example, the cooking appliance surface can be a cooktop, with a portion of the cook disposed near the burners adapted to be heated by the burners. Alternatively, the entire top surface of the cooking appliance surface can be adapted to be heated by at least one heating element. For example, the cooking appliance surface can be the bottom wall of an oven, which is heated by the oven heating element.

[0016] As mentioned, the cooking appliance surface includes a top surface. At least a portion of the top surface is non-hydrophobic. The top surface can be formed of metal, glass, ceramic, composites, or any other suitable material, or combinations thereof. For example, the metal can be porcelain enameled metal, plated metal, including steel, cast iron, and stainless steel, and combinations thereof. The glass can be, for example, borosilicate glass, high temperature resistive glass, spun glass, glass fibers, and combinations thereof. The top surface can include a coating that allows for easy clean-up for a spill on the surface. Such a coating, however, would not function to retain spills on the top surface.

[0017] Referring to Figures 1-5, at least a portion of the top surface 10 is adapted to be heated by a heating element. For example, as shown in Figures 1-5, the top surface 10 can include burner regions 12 which are heated by a heating element. Referring to Figure 6, the top surface 10, as used herein, can also be that of an oven wall, for example, the entirety of which is adapted to be heated by an oven heating element 36. The hydrophobic pattern 18 can be arranged in any pattern, as described in detail below. Referring to Figure 7, the top surface 10, as used herein, can be the walls of an oven and, for example, the hydrophobic pattern 1 8 can applied to the angles and bends of the recessed bottom wall of an oven to direct spills to flat non-hydrophobic spill containment regions 20 that are easier for a user to clean. The cooking appliance surface can further include one or more of control knobs 14a or control panels 14b, a fan 16, or other similar features. These features can be disposed on or adjacent to the top surface 10.

[0018] The spill containment pattern, and particularly, a hydrophobic pattern 18, is generally formed so as to be in the same plane as the cooking appliance surface. The spill containment pattern can be designed to contain spills 22 resulting from over-boiling of a container of liquid or other food substance and/or to contain spills 22 of room temperature liquids or other food substances resulting from the general cooking process, for example, when pouring liquid or other food substance into a container, when placing a full container on or over the cooking appliance surface, or when removing cooking utensils from pots on a stove.

[0019] As mentioned, the spill containment pattern includes a hydrophobic pattern 18 disposed on the top surface, bounding at least a portion of the non-hydrophobic region of the top surface 10. The bounded portion of the non-hydrophobic region defines a non-hydrophobic spill containment region 20. The hydrophobicity of the hydrophobic pattern 18 repels a spilled liquid or other food substance and causes the same to bead up or puddle up in the non-hydrophobic spill containment region 20. In some embodiments, the spill containment pattern can retain a spill 22 having a height when pooled in the non-hydrophobic spill containment region 20 of less than about 5.5 mm. For example, the spill containment pattern can retain a spill having a height of about 0.5 mm, about 1 mm, about 1.5 mm, about 2 mm, about 2.5 mm, about 3 mm, about 3.5 mm, about 4 mm, about 4.5 mm, about 5mm, or about 5.5 mm. The height of the spilled liquid provides a measure of the amount of spilled liquid retained by a top surface regardless of the area of the non-hydrophobic spill containing region of the top surface. The height of the retained spilled liquid is determined by dividing the volume of spilled liquid retained by the top surface before failure (i.e. leakage) by the area of the non-hydrophobic spill containing region.

[0020] The hydrophobic pattern 18 can be disposed in substantially the same plane as the top surface 10. For example, the hydrophobic pattern 18 can have a thickness of from about 0.001 microns to about 250 microns. Other suitable thickness ranges include from about 0.001 microns to about 2 microns, about 0.01 microns to about 1.5 microns, about 0.1 microns to about 1 microns, about 0.001 microns to about 10 microns, about 0.01 microns to about 8 microns, about 0.05 microns to about 7 microns, about 0.1 microns to about 5 microns, about 1 micron to about 4 microns, about 1 micron to about 10 microns, about 2 microns to about 8 microns, about 4 microns to about 6 microns, about 10 microns to about 100 microns, about 20 microns to about 80 microns, about 40 microns to about 60 microns, about 100 microns to about 250 microns, about 150 to about 200 microns, about 1 micron to about 250 microns, about 10 microns to about 200 microns, about 20 microns to about 150 microns, about 30 microns to about 100 microns, about 40 microns to about 80 microns, and about 50 microns to about 70 microns. Other suitable thickness include, for example, about 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 , 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 180, 190, 200, 210, 220, 320, 240, and 250 microns.

[0021] A variety of spill containment patterns can be used depending on the desired spill containment effect. Referring to Figures 1A and IB, for example, the hydrophobic pattern 18 can be in the form of a single, frame-like border that extends along the perimeter of the top surface 10. In this case, a spill 22 (not shown) is prevented from exiting the top surface, and rather is forced by the bounding hydrophobic pattern 18 to remain in the non-hydrophobic spill containment region 20.

[0022] More specifically, the hydrophobic pattern 18 can include a continuous pattern formed of parallel left and right side edge containment strips 18a, 18b, and parallel front and rear edge containment strips 18c, 18d, i.e., all respectively engaged to adjacent ones. Each of the edge containment strips 18a-18d is generally uniform in width. In forming a frame-like border hydrophobic pattern 18, as shown in Figures 1A and IB, the containment strips can be disposed directly at a respective edge of the top surface 10. That is, in the embodiment depicted in Figures 1A and IB, there is no non-hydrophobic area on the top surface 10 between the hydrophobic pattern 18 and the perimeter edge of the top surface 10. In alternative embodiments of a frame-like hydrophobic pattern, however, at least one of the strips 18a-18d can be offset inward from the perimeter edge of the top surface 10 such that the top surface can include a non-hydrophobic area disposed between at least a portion of the hydrophobic pattern 18 and the perimeter edge of the top surface 10.

[0023] The side edge containment strips 18a, 18b are disposed at substantially right angles relative to the front and rear edge containment strips 18c, I8d. So configured, the hydrophobic pattern 18 of the embodiment depicted in Figures 1A and IB forms a continuous, generally square, rectangular, and/or box-shape completely bounding, encircling, and/or enclosing the non-hydrophobic spill containment region 20, which also has a generally square, rectangular, and/or box-shape.

[0024] Referring to Figures 2A and 2B, the hydrophobic pattern 18 can also be arranged in a grid type pattern thereby defining a plurality of non-hydrophobic spill containment regions 20. The grid-like spill containment pattern includes a plurality of spaced apart longitudinal spill containment strips 18e-l to 18e-n (n being the number of longitudinal spill containment strips included in the pattern) and a plurality of lateral spill containment strips 18f-l to 18f-m (m being the number of lateral spill containment strips included in the pattern). For example, the grid like pattern illustrated in Figure 2A includes seven longitudinal spill containment strips 18e-l to 18-7, and eleven lateral spill containment strips 18f-l to 18f-l l . The longitudinal spill containment strips 18e-l to 18e-n intersect the lateral spill containment strips 18f-l to 18f-n at generally right angles. As depicted, the longitudinal spill containment strips 18e-l to 18e-n are parallel to each other, as well as parallel to the left and right side spill containment strips 18a, 18b (if present). Moreover, the lateral spill containment strips 18f-l to 18f-n are parallel to each other, as well as parallel to the front and rear spill containment strips 18c, 18d (if present). Other configurations are intended to be within the scope of the disclosure. For example, the respective sets of spill containing strips could be angled to one another, or one or both of them could be curved or wavy. The gridlike pattern can also be disposed across the burner 12, the control knobs 14a, the control panel 14b, and/or the fan region 16. Alternatively, as shown in Figure 2A, the burners 12 or other regions can remain uncovered by the grid-like pattern or any other portion of the hydrophobic pattern 18.

[0025] The grid-like hydrophobic pattern 18 defines a plurality of non-hydrophobic spill containment regions 20a- 1 to 20a-p (where p is the number of non-hydrophobic spill containment regions disposed on the top surface 10). In general, each of the non-hydrophobic spill containment regions 20a- 1 to 20a-p is completely bounded, encircled, and/or enclosed by four of the spill containment strips and is therefore square, rectangular, and/or box-shaped. In the case where the grid pattern is not continuously disposed over the burners 12, control knobs 14a, control panels 14b, or fan 16 regions, the non-hydrophobic

spill containment regions disposed near those features may have a different shape and may be bounded by four spill containment strips, with portions of other spill containment strips being disposed within the non-hydrophobic spill containment region 20. In the grid-like arrangement, each of the non-hydrophobic spill containment regions 20a- 1 to 20a-p is capable of containing a spill 22 (not shown) separate from the other non-hydrophobic spill containment regions 20a- 1 to 20a-p.

[0026] Referring to Figure 3, the hydrophobic pattern can also comprise multiple framelike borders on the top surface 10. For example, as illustrated in Figure 3, the hydrophobic pattern 18 can have a double-border configuration consisting of a first continuous

hydrophobic surface border 24 and a second continuous hydrophobic surface border 26 disposed inside of the first hydrophobic surface border 24.

[0027] The first hydrophobic surface border 24 can be disposed about the perimeter edge of the top surface 10, and the second hydrophobic surface border 26 can be offset inwardly from the first hydrophobic surface border 24. The first hydrophobic surface border 24 includes parallel left and right side edge containment strips 24a, 24b, and parallel front and rear edge containment strips 24c, 24d. Each of the edge containment strips 24a-24d of the first continuous hydrophobic surface border 24 is generally uniform in width and arranged in an elongated linear configuration directly at the edge of the perimeter of the top surface 10. The side edge containment strips 24a, 24b are disposed at right angles relative to the front and rear edge containment strips 24c, 24d. So configured, the first hydrophobic surface border 24 forms a continuous generally square, rectangular, and/or box-shape completely bounding, encircling, and/or enclosing the non-hydrophobic spill containment region 28, which is also generally square, rectangular, and/or box-shaped.

[0028] Moreover, as depicted, the second continuous hydrophobic surface border 26 includes parallel left and right side edge containment strips 26a, 26b, and parallel front and rear edge containment strips 26c, 26d. Each of the edge containment strips 26a-26d of the second hydrophobic surface border 26 is generally uniform in width and arranged in an elongated linear configuration offset inwardly from the first hydrophobic surface border 24. The side edge containment strips 26a, 26b are disposed at right angles relative to the front and rear edge containment strips 26c, 26d such that the second hydrophobic surface border 26 forms a generally square, rectangular, and/or box-shape completely bounding, encircling, and/or enclosing a portion of the non-hydrophobic spill containment region 28 of the top

surface 10. So configured, the first and second hydrophobic surface borders 24, 26 define a non-hydrophobic spill containment ring region 30 located between the two borders 24, 26. The non-hydrophobic spill containment ring region 30 can advantageously capture any spill overflow which might escape from the non-hydrophobic spill containment region 28 and travel over the second hydrophobic surface border 26.

[0029] These and other variations in the spill containment pattern 18 can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the novel concepts of the preferred embodiments of the present disclosure. For example, while Figure 3 depicts a double-border pattern, a pattern of any number concentric or non-concentric border patterns could be provided on the top surface 10. Each border pattern can, for example, surround at least a portion of the non-hydrophobic region. Furthermore, a grid-like hydrophobic pattern can be formed in any of the non-hydrophobic spill containment regions to further define smaller non-hydrophobic spill containment regions.

[0030] Referring to Figures 4 and 5, the hydrophobic pattern 18 can be disposed to direct spills 22 away from a particular region of the cooking appliance surface, including, for example, heated regions of the top surface, control knobs 14a or panels 14b, fan and vent openings, such as an exhaust intake grill area 16 of a fan (not shown), cal rods, and the like. For example, the hydrophobic pattern 18 can include a portion 32 that is disposed adjacent to and/or surrounds the regions of the top surface adapted to be heated by the heating element, thereby preventing spills 22 from entering the region of the top surface 10 adapted to be heated by the heating element. Referring to Figures 1-4, the hydrophobic pattern 18 can also include a portion 34 that is disposed adjacent to, surrounding, and/or covering control knobs 14a, control panels 14b, intake fan regions 16, surface-mounted timer/clocks, or any other similar feature which is disposed on or adjacent to the top surface 10. Any combination of the above-described hydrophobic pattern 18 arrangements or any other hydrophobic pattern 18 arrangements can be used and can be designed so as to direct a spill 22 to a particular region of the top surface 10.

[0031] To illustrate the concepts of liquid spillage, a spill 22 is illustrated in Figures 4 and 5. As shown in the figures, the hydrophobic pattern 18 contains the spill 22 in the non-hydrophobic spill containment region 20, thereby preventing the spill 22 from exiting the top surface 10. Portions of the hydrophobic pattern 32 and 34 disposed about the burner regions 12 and the control knob 14a, control panel 14b, and fan intake region 16, prevent the spill from entering those regions. Thus, from the foregoing, the present disclosure encompasses a high temperature type surface that includes hydrophobic (or super hydrophobic) patterns of materials disposed thereon for (1) containing spills within a pre-defined area, (2) repelling spills from a pre-defined area, as well as (3) hydrophobic (or super hydrophobic) patterns specifically configured to contain spills in some areas and simultaneously repel spills from other areas.

[0032] The hydrophobic pattern 18 is formed by applying a hydrophobic or super hydrophobic compound to the top surface 10 in the desired hydrophobic pattern 18 arrangement. A variety of hydrophobic or super-hydrophobic compounds can be used to form the hydrophobic pattern, and the compounds can be applied by a variety of methods. If it is desired to contain hot liquids, the hydrophobic or super-hydrophobic material should be adapted to maintain its hydrophobicity when contacted with the hot liquids, so as to be able to repel the hot liquids and direct them to pool in the non-hydrophobic spill containment region 20 of the top surface 10 of the cooking appliance surface. In general, as to domestic and professional cooking procedures, hot liquids have a temperature in a range of 50°C to about 210°C. For example, suitable hydrophobic materials for use in repelling hot liquids can include, fluorocarbons, flurorpolymers such as polytetrafluoroethylene (commercially available from DuPont as TEFLON), a superhydrophobic surface coating using TEFLON {See Van der Wal et al, 3 Soft Matter 426 (2009)), silicone based coatings, a composite of polytetrafluoroethylene (commercially available from DuPont as TEFLON) and carbon nanotubes {See Liu et al., 19 J. Materials Chem. 5602 (2009)), and combinations thereof.

[0033 J As described above, at least a portion of the top surface 10 of the cooking appliance surface is adapted to be heated by a heating element. In various embodiments of the disclosure, the hydrophobic pattern 18 is disposed on or near the regions of the top surface 10 adapted to be heated by the heating element. In these embodiments, the hydrophobic or super-hydrophobic compound and any other compounds used to form the hydrophobic pattern 18 should be suitable for use on a heated surface. For example, the hydrophobic or super-hydrophobic material should be suitable for use on a surface having a temperature in a range of ambient temperature to about 500°C. Preferably, the hydrophobic compound and any other compounds used to form the hydrophobic pattern 18 are stable and resilient against repeated heating and cooling cycles.

[0034] Examples of hydrophobic compounds for use in forming the hydrophobic pattern 18 include, for example, organic polymers, inorganic polymers, fluorocarbons, olefins, nanomaterials, nanomaterial-organic polymer blends, ceramics, and combinations thereof. The organic polymers include fluoropolymers, graph polymers, copolymers, and blends. Specific fluoropolymers include, for example, PTFE/polyphenylene sulfide blends and copolymers, plasma deposited fluoropolymer coating from CFC-1 13 and C2H4, plasma deposited fluoropolymer coatings from precursors that include CF4, C2F6, C4Fg, and mixtures thereof, electrospun initiated-chemical vapor deposited perfluoroalkyl ethyl methacrylate, fluoropolyamide-polyimide polymers, and ftuorinated graph polymers. Also suitable are blends of polysulfone resins and fluoropolymers. The inorganic polymers include, for example, organopolysiloxanes, fluoropolysiloxane, and fluorinated polyester modified polysiloxane polymers. The fluorocarbons include, for example, fluoroalkyl silanes, fluoroalkoxy silanes, fluoroalkyl alkyl silanes, and combinations thereof. Specific silanes include, for example, tridecafluoro-l,l,2,2-tetrahydrooctyl trichlorosilane,

nonafluorohexyldimethyl-(dimethylamino)silane,

heptadecafluorotetrahydrodecyldimethyl(dimethylamino)silane, tetrahdyrodecyl-tris(dimethylamino)silane, tridecafluoro-l,l,2,2,-tetrahydrooctyl silane, (tridecafluoro-1 , 1 ,2,2-tetrahydooctyl)trimethoxysilane, (tridecafluoro- 1,1,2,2-tetrahydooctyl)triethoxysilane, n-octadecyl trimethoxysilane, n-octyl triethoxysilane, and heptadecafluoro- 1 , 1 ,2,2-tetrahedyodecyl-tris(dimethylamino)silane. Nanomaterials include, for example, colloidal silica, 60-nm Si02 on NH3-terminated self-assembled monolayers, silica nanocrystals, silica nanowires, silica nanofibers, silica nanorods, silica nanotrees, colloidal silica mixed with n-hexane, silica nanofibers coated with an organic polymer, an inorganic polymer, fluoro and/or silyl compounds, e.g., PTFE, Tri-sil, tridecafluoro- 1,1 , 2, 2-tetrahydrooctyl-l -tricholorosilane, hexamethyldisilazane, aliphatic hydrocarbon containing molecules, aromatic hydrocarbon containing molecules, halogen containing molecules, and paralyene. Ceramics include, for example, patterned Si02/Ti02 surfaces treated with a fluoroalkylsilane, roughened silica, Si3TiOg, fumed silicon dioxide, silica aerogel, and glow discharged polymerized silicon. Other suitable ceramics include, for example, T1O2, MgAl204 spinels, diatomaceous earth, colloidal silver impregnated polymer matrices, carbonized lotus leaf, graphite on polytetrahaloethylene, ZnO and/or MgO deposited on polytetrahaloethylene, CVD deposited diamond, nano-laminas of boron nitride, hydrophobic zeolites, such as (Si02)io+(A1203), and hydrophobic aerogels.

[0035] Any method of applying the hydrophobic compound to form the hydrophobic spill containment pattern may be used. For example, the hydrophobic compound can be applied using an application technique such as spraying; brushing; wiping; dipping; solvent casting; flow coating; curtain coating; roller coating; spin coating; printing; screen printing; ink jet printing; vacuum coating; magnetic field-assisted cathodic sputtering; plasma deposition; plasma magnetron deposition; chemical vapor deposition ("CVD"); plasma or atmospheric CVD; powder or liquid pyrolysis; atomization; electrophoretic deposition; cross-linking processes; and combinations thereof.

[0036] In various embodiments the hydrophobic pattern 18 can be formed by first roughening the portion of the top surface 10 to be made hydrophobic using various methods, and then applying a hydrophobic compound to the roughened surface. Suitable roughening methods include, for example, sanding, abrading, etching, such as acid etching, or otherwise removing material from the top surface 10.

[0037] Etching can be performed using, for example, hydrofluoric acid, sodium silicate, bifluorides, including for example, a ammonium bifluoride sodium bifluoride, and mixtures thereof, any other known etching solutions, and any mixtures thereof. Commercially available etching solutions are available, for example from Armour* Products (Hawthorne, New Jersey). For examples, the Armour Etch Bath® Glass Dipping Solution (product name) or Armour Etch® Glass Etching Cream (product name), available from Armour® Products can be used, and includes a mixture of ammonium bifluoride and sodium bifluoride. The etching solution can be applied to the top surface 10 with an applicator in the desired pattern. A mask, which is resistant to the etching solution, can be placed on the region of the top surface 10 to be non-hydrophobic to protect this region from being etched. The etching solution can be allowed to remain on the top surface for a time in a range of about 15 seconds to about 20 minutes, about 20 seconds to about 15 minutes, about 30 seconds to about 10 minutes, about 45 seconds to about 8 minutes, about 1 minute to about 10 minutes, about 2 minutes to about 8 minutes, about 4 minutes to about 6 minutes, about 15 seconds to about 1 minute, about 20 seconds to about 50 seconds, about 25 seconds to about 45 seconds, about 30 seconds to about 40 seconds, about 1 minute to about 20 minutes, about 5 to about 15 minutes, or about 7 minutes to about 10 minutes. Other suitable times include, for example, about 15 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 35 seconds, 40 seconds, 45 seconds, 50 seconds, 55 seconds, 1 minute, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 4 minutes, 5 minutes, 6 minutes, 7 minutes, 8 minutes, 9 minutes, 10 minutes, 11 minutes, 12 minutes, 13 minutes, 14 minutes, 15 minutes, 16 minutes, 17 minutes, 18 minutes, 19 minutes, and 20 minutes.

[0038] The hydrophobic pattern 18 can also be formed, for example, by providing a coating of hydrophobic particles on the surface, by using sol-gel deposition, either on top of or within the matrix of the sol-gel, by applying a metal oxide primer with an integrated or separate hydrophobic compound, by applying a hydrophobic compound comprising a variety of molecular chain lengths to create a coating with surface irregularities, or by adhering a thin material to the surface, such as a tape of thin glass or plastic which has been made hydrophobic. The hydrophobic pattern 18 can be formed, for example, by applying a frit material, such as a ceramic or porcelain frit material, with or without structure forming particles therein, to the top surface 10 in the desired pattern arrangement, curing the frit, and then applying a hydrophobic compound over the cured frit and curing the hydrophobic compound. The frit can be a ceramic frit, a porcelain frit, or a combination thereof. In some embodiments, the frit layer can have a thermal insulating effect sufficient to prevent or reduce the amount of heat transfer that may occur between the top surface and the

hydrophobic material applied thereto, thereby increasing the useful life of the hydrophobic pattern by reducing potential thermal degradation.

[0039] Any combination of the above-described surface treatment methods can be also be used. For example, the top surface 10 can be first prepared by applying and curing a frit material to the top surface 10. The frit material can then be etched using an etching solution as described above, and a hydrophobic compound can be applied to the etched frit.

Alternatively, the entire top surface 10 including the frit material can be etched using an etching solution, and a hydrophobic compound can then be applied to the etched ceramic frit. Without intending to be bound by theory, it is believed that etching the frit prior to application of the hydrophobic compound can improve the hydrophobic properties of the hydrophobic pattern 18 by creating additional bonding sites on the frit to which the hydrophobic compound can bond. Additionally, the etched frit may include more surface area to which the hydrophobic compound can attached by virtue of the combined macro-scale surface roughening provided by the frit and micro-scale surface roughening provided by etching the frit.

[0040] The hydrophobic surface treatments described herein can be cured according to a number of different methods, if curing is required by the surface preparation or the

hydrophobic compound, including without limitation: conduction heating; convection heating; UV radiation; VUV radiation; electron beam irradiation; ionizing radiation; laser; 1R; and thermal radiation. The hydrophobic surface treatments can also be cured by remaining at ambient conditions for a sufficient length of time, for example, from about 16 hours to about 48 hours, from about 20 hours to about 40 hours, and from about 25 hours to about 35 hours. Curing can be performed in a controlled humidity environment. For example, curing can be performed at less than 70% humidity, less than 60% humidity, less than 50% humidity, less than 40% humidity, less than 30% humidity, less than 20% humidity, less than 10% humidity, or at 0% humidity.

[0041] In one embodiment, the cooking appliance assembly comprises a glass, a glass ceramic, or a tempered glass top surface 10 which is printed, e.g., screen printed, with a frit material, over which a hydrophobic coating can be applied if needed to impart

hydrophobicity to the frit. The frit can be patterned on the top surface 10 using any known placing, printing, or other patterning methods. The frit material is placed or printed in a pattern, for example, a frame-like border pattern on the top surface 10, which defines at least a portion of the spill containment pattern. For example, the frit material can be screen printed onto the top surface 10 in the desired pattern using, for example, a silk screen having a mesh count in a range of about 80 to about 360, about 100 to about 300, about 120 to about 280, about 140 to about 240, about 160 to about 220, about 180 to about 200, about 86 to about 360. Other suitable mesh counts include about 80, 82, 84, 86, 88, 90, 92, 94, 96, 98, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 180, 190, 200, 210, 220, 320, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, 290, 300, 310, 320, 340, 350, and 360. Various other mesh counts may be suitable depending on the composition and particle size of the frit material used. As described in above, the hydrophobic pattern 18, and consequently, the frit pattern, can have a variety of shapes and sizes, and can be placed in a variety of locations on the glass top surface 10. Additionally, portions of the hydrophobic pattern 18 can be formed, for example, using different hydrophobic compounds and/or different surface treatments. For example, a portion of the hydrophobic pattern 18 can be formed, for example, by applying and curing a ceramic frit to the top surface 10 and applying a hydrophobic compound to the cured frit, and another portion of the hydrophobic spill containment pattern can be formed, for example, by acid etching a portion of the top surface 10 and applying the hydrophobic compound to the etched portion.

[0042] In accordance with various aspects of the invention, the frit material can include finely ground particles. For example, the ceramic frit material can include lead oxide, silicon dioxide, aluminum oxide, and mixtures thereof. Preferably, the frit material includes silicon dioxide. For example, the frit material includes from 5 weight percent (wt.%) to about 100 wt.% silicon dioxide, from about 10 wt.% to about 80 wt.%, from about 20 wt.% to about 60 wt.% from about 30 wt.% to about 40 wt.% from about 15 wt.% to about 75 wt.%, from about 20 wt.% to about 50 wt.%. Other suitable amounts of silicon dioxide in the frit material can include, for example, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95 and 100 wt.%. The ceramic frit material can include about 29 wt.% silicon dioxide. The ceramic frit material can also include, for example, additives, such as tantalum oxide, titanium dioxide, calcium oxide, zirconium oxide, sodium oxide, potassium oxides, iron oxide magnesium oxide, barium oxide, bismuth oxide, and mixtures thereof. Suitable commercially available frit materials can be used. For example, a commercially available frit material is available from Ferro Corp. (hereinafter "the Ferro frit") under Product No. A0430 Etch C32 Medium, and contains about 53.71 wt.% lead oxide, about 29 wt.% silicon dioxide, 15.72 wt.% aluminum oxide, 0.39 wt.% tantalum oxide, 0.38 wt.% titanium dioxide, 0.28 wt.% calcium oxide, 0.26 wt.% zirconium oxide, 0.1 1 wt.% sodium oxide, 0.04 wt.% potassium oxide, 0.04 wt.% iron oxide, 0.03 wt.% magnesium oxide, 0.02 wt.% barium oxide, and 0.02 wt.% bismuth oxide. Another suitable a commercially available frit material is available from Ferro Corp. (hereinafter "the Ferro frit") under Product No. GAL-41727, and contains about 36.25 wt.% lead oxide, about 33.82 wt.% silicon dioxide, 4.31 wt.% aluminum oxide, 19.74 wt.% zinc oxide, 5.50 wt.% titanium dioxide, 0.13 wt.% potassium oxide, 0.08 wt.% iron oxide, 0.07 wt.% zirconium oxide, 0.04 wt.% niobium oxide, 0.02 wt.% calcium oxide, 0.02 wt.% magnesium oxide, 0.01 wt.% cobalt oxide, and 0.01 wt.% nickel oxide.

[0043] The particles of the frit material may be mixed with inorganic or organic pigments or dyes, so as to yield a desired color. The frit material may be provided as a dry powder or as a paste or other such mixture. Once the frit material is placed on the top surface 10, the frit is then coupled to the top surface 10. For example, the frit can be coupled to the top surface 10 by fusing the frit to the top surface 10. The frit can be coupled or fused to top surface 10 by heating the top surface 10 to a temperature in a range of about 1000°F to about 1400°F, about 1100°F to about 1300°F, about 1100°F to about 1200°F, and about 1200°F to about 1400°F. Other suitable temperatures include about 1000°F, 1050°F, 1 100°F, 1 150°F, 1200°F,

1250°F, 1300°F, 1350°F, and 1400°F. This heat treatment will cause the particles of the frit to cure by fusing to each other and to the glass surface to form a continuous structure and thereby couple the frit to the top surface 10. The pattern of the fused frit will be substantially identical to the pattern in which the frit material was placed on the top surface 10. It is believed that this fused frit coating can be characterized as being nearly as hard and tough as the glass itself.

[0044] In one embodiment, the frit can include some micro-scale additive particles which will remain unmelted at the temperature at which the frit is sintered, as described for example in U.S. Patents 4,591,530, 6,872,441 , 6,800,354, 5,324,566, and 5,437,894, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. The frit is printed or placed in the pattern of a frame-like border at or near the outer perimeter of the cooking appliance surface or other desired location for the spill containment pattern. The surface with the printed frit is then heated to a temperature above the melting point of the primary components of the frit material, but below the melting point of the material of the cooking appliance surface, for a time sufficient to cure the frit so that it is fused or bonded to the surface. The specific time and temperature required to sinter the frit will vary based on the materials chosen for the frit.

[0045] The hydrophobic compound can be applied to the frit material as a hydrophobic solution, which includes a solvent and the hydrophobic compound dissolved or dispersed in the solvent. The solvent can be, for example, dry or wet hexane. Suitable solvents include, for example, hexane, heptanes, methyl chloride, naptha, toluene, acetone, perfluorocarbons, and mixtures thereof. The hydrophobic solution can include from about 0.1 % to about 5% of hydrophobic compound. Other suitable ranges include, for example, about 0.5 % to 4%, about 1% to about 3%, about 1% to about 5%, and about 2% to about 4%. Suitable amounts of the hydrophobic compound in the hydrophobic solution, can include, for example, about 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1 , 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 4.5, and 5%. For example, a 1% solution of tridecafluoro-l,l ,2,2-tetrahydrooctyl trichlorosilane, a perfluoroalkyl alkyl silane, in hexane, can be applied, for example by wiping the solution onto the cooking appliance surface or a frit or other surface pretreatment, or applying the solution using an applicator tip, or by using any other known method. The hydrophobic compound can be applied to the solution using, for example, a one pass method in which a coated applicator is swept across the region designed as the spill containment pattern a single time or a multiple pass method in which the applicator is passed over the frit border two or more times.

[0046] The hydrophobic solution is then cured by heating it and/or exposing it to controlled humidity for a period of time. For example, conductive heating, convention heating, thermal radiation, UV radiation, VUV radiation, electron beam irradiation, ionizing radiation, laser, IR can be used to cure the hydrophobic solution. The hydrophobic solution can be cured, for example, at a temperature in a range of about 100°F to about 600°F, about 150°F to about 550°F, about 200°F to about 500°F, about 250°F to about 450°F, about 300°F to about 350°F, or about 100°F to about 300°F. Other suitable temperatures include, for example, about 100°F, 150°F, 200°F, 250°F, 300°F, 350°F, 400°F, 450°F, 500°F, 550°F, and 600°F. The hydrophobic solution can be cured, for example, by heating for a time in a range of about 2 seconds to about 1 hour, about 2 seconds to about 1 minute, about 4 seconds to about 50 seconds, about 6 seconds to about 40 seconds, about 8 seconds to about 30 seconds, about 10 seconds to about 20 seconds, about 2 seconds to about 5 seconds, about 25 seconds to about 1 minutes, about 5 minutes to about 1 hour, about 10 minutes to about 45 minutes, about 20 minutes to about 30 minutes, about 10 minutes to about 20 minutes, and about 15 minutes to about 30 minutes. Other suitable times include, for example, about 2 seconds, 4 seconds, 6 seconds, 8 seconds, 10 seconds, 15 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 35 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 55 seconds, 60 seconds, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 25 minutes, 30 minutes, 35 minutes, 40 minutes, 45 minutes, 50 minutes, 55 minutes, and 60 minutes.

[0047] Alternatively, the hydrophobic solution can be cured without heating. Heating, however, can accelerate the curing process. For example, the hydrophobic solution can be allowed to cure by leaving the glass top surface 10 having the cured ceramic frit coated with the hydrophobic solution in ambient conditions for a time in a range of about 16 to about 48 hours, about 20 to about 40 hours, about 25 to about 35 hours, about 16 to about 24 hours, or about 20 hours to about 30 hours. The hydrophobic solution can be cured, whether at elevated temperatures or at ambient temperature, in relatively dry environment. For example, the hydrophobic solution can be cured in an environment having less than 70% humidity, less than 60% humidity, less than 50% humidity, less than 40% humidity, less than 30% humidity, less than 20% humidity, less than 10% humidity, or at 0% humidity. Upon curing, the hydrophobic compound preferably forms a continuous hydrophobic layer on the fused frit or other surface treatment.

[0048J Without intending to be bound by theory, it is believed that in the case of a fluorosilane, bonding is achieved between surface Si-OH contained on and extending from the surface of the fused frit material or other modified top surface 10 surface, such as, for example, an acid etched surface, and the Si-OH groups of the silane. The surface hydroxyl groups can results from partial hydrolysis of the silane and the silicon dioxide in the fused frit material during heating. The Si-OH groups are caused to react with corresponding groups to form Si-O-Si linkages between the silane and the fused frit material. Correspondingly, Si-OH groups of adjacent silane molecules are also caused to react and form Si-O-Si cross linkages, thereby forming a continuous hydrophobic layer across the frit material. The method described herein will produce a hydrophobic surface that is a continuous border around the perimeter of the top surface 10 which will operate as a spill containment feature. The bonding of other hydrophobic materials to the modified top surface 10 can occur through chemical or physical adhesions mechanisms. It is believed that silane nanomaterials bind to the surface through an analogous binding mechanism as described for the binding of fluorosilanes, above. Other nanomaterials may bind through similar chemical adhesion mechanisms, through molecular rearrangement, or through interpenetration with the top surface 10. Electrodeposition, chemical vapor deposition, electrophoretic deposition, sputtering, and other physiochemical deposition methods yield materials bound to the top surface 10 through physiochemical and electrochemical bonds that are dependant on the chemical formulation of the deposited hydrophobic material.

[0049] One advantage of using a ceramic frit material to prepare the top surface 10 for coating with the hydrophobic solution as described herein, in addition to improving the durability of the hydrophobic surface, is that frit material is commercially available in multiple colors and can be printed in a manner which allows for the inclusion of designs, company names or logos in the surface area where the frit material is applied to the top surface 10.

[0050] Preferably, the hydrophobic pattern 18 is durable, and resists chipping, peeling, fading, and scratching. Advantageously, the hydrophobic pattern 18 can be designed to be resistant to abrasions from common household containers, such as, for example, pots, pans, cooking utensils, and other such cooking containers, as well as glass jars and other food containers. In addition, the hydrophobic pattern 18 can be designed to be resistant to most chemicals, such as for example, dish soap, Windex, Sparkle, Clorox wipes, and Formula 409 All Purpose Cleaner. The hydrophobic pattern 18 can resist multiple cleanings without experiencing a decrease in the spill containment pattern's ability to retain a spill.

[0051] It will be apparent to those skilled in the pertinent arts that other embodiments of cooking appliance and cooking appliance surfaces in accordance with the disclosure may be designed. That is, the principles of cooking appliance surfaces in accordance with the disclosure are not limited to the specific embodiments described herein. For example, cooking appliance surface having a spill containment pattern could be used in various settings, such as toaster ovens, indoor grilling appliances, or the like.

[0052] Further, it will be apparent to those skilled in the pertinent art that any method which may be used for creating a hydrophobic pattern in substantially the same plane as the top surface of the cooking appliance surface is within the scope of the disclosure described herein, even if such method requires the use of multiple pieces to manufacture the cooking appliance surface. For example, a frame of hydrophobic material may be bonded to the top surface of the cooking appliance surface such that it forms a continuous border which is generally in the same plane as the top surface. Accordingly, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that modifications and other variations of the above-described illustrative embodiments of the disclosure may be effected without departing from the spirit and scope of the novel concepts of the invention.