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1. (WO2019066740) 3 DIMENSIONAL OBSERVATION OF VERY DISTANT STARS AND PLANETS IN SPACE
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3 DIMENSIONAL OBSERVATION OF VERY DISTANT STARS AND PLANETS

IN SPACE

FIELD OF INVENTION

The invention involves a method of 3 dimensionally observing stars and planets in space with very high-power telescopes, and a method of 3 dimensionally viewing space images that are recorded in 2 -dimensions with very high-power telescopes.

PRIOR ART

Humans cannot see in 3 dimensions with a single eye. The human eye can see in 2 dimensions. However, humans can see in 3 dimensions because they have two eyes. The two eyes are approximately 6-7 cm apart. This distance establishes different angles with objects that we view from small distances. The two eyes receive two different images. The brain receives two different images. The human brain transforms these two images into a single, 3-dimensional image. This is how we perceive the objects at which we look in 3 dimensions. In order to have a good 3 dimensional perception of the objects at which we look, the objects we view must not be very distant from our eyes. For good 3 dimensional vision, the objects we view must not be farther than 2-3 meters from the eye. The perception of 3 dimensions diminishes and disappears as this distance increased.

The ratio of the distance between the eyes and the distance to the point we look at constitutes the angle difference. Our two eyes are 6-7 centimeters from each other. The angle that is established when we look at an object at 25 cm - 250 cm distance is adequate for good 3D perception.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The 3 dimensional observation of very distant stars and planets in space can be carried out using two methods according to the invention.

Method 1 : 3D image that is constructed by acquiring data with a fixed camera (recorder)(1) and an object rotating on its own axis, Method 2: 3D image that is constructed by acquiring data when the moving observer changes place or location while the object is fixed.

The human eye cannot see objects farther than 10 meters in 3 dimensions. Because we perceive objects in 2 dimensions after 10 meters.

The invention will allow the observing astronomers to observe in 3 dimensions the planets or celestial objects that they traditionally view in 2 dimensions. This will allow obtaining information and ideas concerning planets or stars in much more detail. This will revolutionize space research.

The aforementioned subject involves adapting the two methods to each other with a suitable software in a manner that allows viewing all variables on the screen. The viewing times of the recorded images may be modified to increase the difference in angles. This will allow a closer and more detailed inspection of planets or stars in 3D (3 dimensions).

Storage units that can record very long periods of space images (server, hard disk, etc.), a suitable software that can display the old and new images on the same screen, a computer hardware with the software, and a tv screen (monitor) that allows 3D viewing are necessary.

SHORT DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Figure 1 : Drawing for the moving recorder, Figure 2: Drawing for the fixed recorder, Figure 2:

NUMBERING OF THE PARTS

1. Camera (recorder)

2. Internal storage units (server, hard disk, etc.)

3. Service box

4. Software

5. Computer

6. 3D Screen

7. Cable

8. Object to record

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides researchers with more detailed information and the ability to construct 3 dimensional images of very distant stars, planets or celestial bodies based on 2 dimensional images that are acquired with very strong telescopes.

Storage units (server, hard disk) that can store space images for a very long time range, a suitable software that can display the old and new images on the same screen, a computer hardware with the software, and a tv screen (monitor) that allows 3D viewing are necessary.

Images that are acquired with the camera(1) at two different times are stored in the internal storage units (server, hard disk, etc.) and transferred to the computer and / or printer through the service box (3), the software (4) combines these images to obtain a 3D image. The computer (5) is where the software is installed, and it is used to obtain images, the 3D Screen(6) allows viewing the 3D image that is obtained, the Cable (7) provides connection between the units and transfers the data.

The space images that we desire to see in 3 dimensions (3D) are recorded for a certain period of time. The these images are viewed with the record-view method.

For example, we display an older (hours, even days older) image of a celestial body that we desire to see in 3 dimensions to one eye, and the new image to the other eye. Any 3D Monitor or television set that has 3D features can accomplish this. The answer to the question, "how is this possible?" is that distant celestial bodies continuously rotate around their own axes or around a much larger celestial body, and that we can see them in 3D by displaying images of these bodies from different times to our two eyes. The celestial body rotates around its own axis like a sphere. Let's assume that we are viewing a very distant celestial body from an infinite distance. Let's assume that the rotation period of the spherical celestial body that rotates around its own axis is 24 hours (like Earth). Since a complete rotation is 360 degrees, 360/24=15 degrees. This means that 1 hour represents 15 degrees of angular difference. The meaning of this is: If we display the images of the same celestial body with one hour difference to our two eyes, we can obtain an angular difference of 15 degrees. We can modify the delay times as we desire. We can modify it depending on the rotation period of the celestial body, or the angular difference that we prefer. The increasing angular difference will increase our 3 dimensional perception. We have to increase the angular difference in order to increase the feeling of proximity. This is very easy to do with this method. Because we already record the celestial objects that we observe. Showing two eyes two different images that are acquired at 1-2 hours intervals creates a 3 dimensional perception of the celestial object at 1-2 meters distance in our brain.

The aforementioned method allows viewing all celestial bodies that we can see in 3D. However, the other method that we will apply to perceive the locations and differences in depth of these objects is the following: As we know, the Earth rotates around the Sun, following its own orbit. Sunlight takes 8 minutes to reach Earth. The Earth's distance to the Sun is approximately;

Speed of light 300,000 x 60 x 8 =144,000,000 km the distance that light travels. This means that our approximate distance from the sun is 44,000,000 km. This is the radius of the Earth's orbit around the sun. The Earth completes its rotation around the sun in 12 months. This means that in 6 months, the Earth will be at the opposite side of the Sun. Since Earth's distance to the Sun is 144 million km, in 6 months it will have changed its position by 288 million km. The Solar System

rotates in the Milky Way galaxy on a certain orbit. We superimpose the image that we recorded 6 months ago with the current image on a 3D screen. The angular difference between the two images allows us to see space in 3 dimensions (3D). We can observe the relative positions of the planets by using all these locational changes in the direction that we observe. This means that we can examine the universe in a much deeper way.

Adapting the two aforementioned methods to each other with a suitable software allows viewing all variables on the screen. The viewing times of the recorded images may be modified to increase the difference in angles. This creates the perception of having a closer look at planets or stars, and allows creating 3D simulations.

The image can be acquired using two different methods: Method 1 involves acquiring the image with the recording device fixed, and the object rotates on its axis, and Method 2 involves acquiring the image while the observer is rotating around the fixed object. This image acquisition technically happens at different times from different angles and two acquired images are superimposed to easily create 3D simulations of the object.