Processing

Please wait...

Settings

Settings

Goto Application

1. CA2865678 - METHOD AND DEVICE FOR DETERMINING AN ANALYTE CONCENTRATION IN BLOOD

Office Canada
Application Number 2865678
Application Date
Publication Number 2865678
Publication Date 24.10.2013
Grant Number
Grant Date 13.03.2018
Publication Kind C
IPC
G01N 21/84
GPHYSICS
01MEASURING; TESTING
NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
21Investigating or analysing materials by the use of optical means, i.e. using infra-red, visible or ultra-violet light
84Systems specially adapted for particular applications
CPC
G01N 21/8483
GPHYSICS
01MEASURING; TESTING
NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
21Investigating or analysing materials by the use of optical means, i.e. using infra-red, visible or ultra-violet light
84Systems specially adapted for particular applications
8483Investigating reagent band
Applicants F.HOFFMANN-LA ROCHE AG
Priority Data 12164805.9 19.04.2012 EP
Title
(EN) METHOD AND DEVICE FOR DETERMINING AN ANALYTE CONCENTRATION IN BLOOD
(FR) PROCEDE ET DISPOSITIF DE DETERMINATION D'UNE CONCENTRATION D'ANALYTE DANS LE SANG
Abstract
(EN)

A method is proposed for determining at least one concentration of at least
one analyte in the
blood, in particular for determining a blood glucose concentration. In this
method, a test element
(114) is used that has at least one reagent element (124). The reagent element
(124) is configured
so as to carry out at least one optically detectable detection reaction in the
presence of the
analyte. The blood is applied to the test element (114), and a time course of
at least one optical
measurement variable of the reagent element (124) is detected. At least one
first time interval
(158) of the time course of the optical measurement variable is used to
determine at least one
disturbance variable in the blood, in particular a concentration of a
disturbance component, and
preferably a blood hematocrit value. At least one second time interval (164)
of the time course is
used to determine the concentration of the analyte.