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1. WO2020116753 - METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TRANSMITTING DATA UNIT IN WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEM

Document

Description

Title of Invention

Technical Field

1  

Background Art

2  

Disclosure of Invention

Technical Problem

3  

Solution to Problem

4   5   6   7   8   9  

Advantageous Effects of Invention

10   11  

Brief Description of Drawings

12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24  

Best Mode for Carrying out the Invention

25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127   128   129   130   131   132   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   156   157   158   159   160   161   162   163   164   165   166   167   168   169   170   171   172   173   174   175   176   177   178   179   180   181   182   183   184   185   186   187   188   189   190   191   192   193   194   195   196   197   198   199   200   201   202   203   204   205   206   207   208   209   210   211   212   213   214   215   216   217   218   219   220   221   222   223   224   225   226   227   228   229   230   231   232   233   234   235   236   237   238   239   240   241   242  

Industrial Applicability

243  

Claims

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  

Drawings

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13  

Description

Title of Invention : METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TRANSMITTING DATA UNIT IN WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEM

Technical Field

[1]
The present disclosure relates to a wireless communication system. Especially, the present disclosure relates to transmitting a data unit in a wireless communication system.

Background Art

[2]
Introduction of new radio communication technologies has led to increases in the number of user equipments (UEs) to which a base station (BS) provides services in a prescribed resource region, and has also led to increases in the amount of data and control information that the BS transmits to the UEs. Due to typically limited resources available to the BS for communication with the UE(s), new techniques are needed by which the BS utilizes the limited radio resources to efficiently receive/transmit uplink/downlink data and/or uplink/downlink control information. In particular, overcoming delay or latency has become an important challenge in applications whose performance critically depends on delay/latency.

Disclosure of Invention

Technical Problem

[3]
Accordingly, an object of the present disclosure is to transmitting a data unit in a wireless communication system and apparatus therefore.

Solution to Problem

[4]
The object of the present disclosure can be achieved by a method for transmitting a protocol data unit (PDU) by a user equipment (UE) in a wireless communication system including: receiving an uplink (UL) grant from a network; when the UL grant can accommodate all of pending data for a first logical channel but is not sufficient to additionally accommodate a buffer status report (BSR), including the pending data for the first logical channel to the PDU with canceling the BSR; and transmitting the PDU to the network, wherein the UL grant cannot additionally accommodate all of pending data for a second logical channel.
[5]
Further, it is suggested a user equipment (UE) in a wireless communication system comprising a memory; and at least one processor coupled to the memory and configured to: receive an uplink (UL) grant from a network; when the UL grant can accommodate all of pending data for a first logical channel but is not sufficient to additionally accommodate a buffer status report (BSR), include the pending data for the first logical channel to a protocol data unit (PDU) with canceling the BSR; and transmit the PDU to the network, wherein the UL grant cannot additionally accommodate all of pending data for a second logical channel.
[6]
Preferably, the PDU includes a part of the pending data for the second logical channel.
[7]
More preferably, the UE may transmit an indicator indicating that there is remaining data for the second logical channel to the network.
[8]
Additionally, the UE may receive information related to the first logical channel. In this case, the information includes at least one of an identifier of the first logical channel and an identifier of a logical channel group to which the first logical channel belongs.
[9]
Alternatively, the at least one processor is further configured to implement at least one advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) function based on signals that control the UE.

Advantageous Effects of Invention

[10]
According to the aforementioned embodiments of the present disclosure, the UE can transmit a PDU efficiently.
[11]
Effects obtainable from the present disclosure may be non-limited by the above mentioned effect. And, other unmentioned effects can be clearly understood from the following description by those having ordinary skill in the technical field to which the present disclosure pertains.

Brief Description of Drawings

[12]
FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating an example of a network structure of an evolved universal mobile telecommunication system (E-UMTS) as an exemplary radio communication system;
[13]
FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an example of an evolved universal terrestrial radio access network (E-UTRAN);
[14]
FIG. 3 is a block diagram depicting an example of an architecture of a typical E-UTRAN and a typical EPC;
[15]
FIG. 4 is a diagram showing an example of a control plane and a user plane of a radio interface protocol between a UE and an E-UTRAN based on a 3GPP radio access network standard;
[16]
FIG. 5 is a diagram showing an example of a physical channel structure used in an E-UMTS system;
[17]
FIG. 6 illustrates an example of protocol stacks of a next generation wireless communication system;
[18]
FIG. 7 illustrates an example of a data flow example at a transmitting device in the NR system;
[19]
FIG. 8 illustrates an example of a slot structure available in a new radio access technology (NR);
[20]
FIG. 9 shows a behavior of UE according to the BSR cancellation of the present disclosure;
[21]
FIG. 10 shows an UL resource allocation procedure according to the present disclosure;
[22]
FIG. 11 shows a MAC PDU generation procedure according to the present disclosure;
[23]
FIG. 12 shows an example to which the present disclosure is applied; and
[24]
FIG. 13 is a block diagram illustrating an example of elements of a transmitting device 100 and a receiving device 200 according to some implementations of the present disclosure.

Best Mode for Carrying out the Invention

[25]
The technical objects that can be achieved through the present disclosure are not limited to what has been particularly described hereinabove and other technical objects not described herein will be more clearly understood by persons skilled in the art from the following detailed description.
[26]
FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating an example of a network structure of an E-UMTS as an exemplary radio communication system. An Evolved Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (E-UMTS) is an advanced version of a Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) and basic standardization thereof is currently underway in the 3GPP. E-UMTS may be generally referred to as a Long Term Evolution (LTE) system. For details of the technical specifications of the UMTS and E-UMTS, reference can be made to Release 7 and Release 8 of "3rd Generation Partnership Project; Technical Specification Group Radio Access Network".
[27]
Referring to FIG. 1, the E-UMTS includes a User Equipment (UE), eNode Bs (eNBs), and an Access Gateway (AG) which is located at an end of the network (E-UTRAN) and connected to an external network. The eNBs may simultaneously transmit multiple data streams for a broadcast service, a multicast service, and/or a unicast service.
[28]
One or more cells may exist per eNB. The cell is set to operate in one of bandwidths such as 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, and 20 MHz and provides a downlink (DL) or uplink (UL) transmission service to a plurality of UEs in the bandwidth. Different cells may be set to provide different bandwidths. The eNB controls data transmission or reception to and from a plurality of UEs. The eNB transmits DL scheduling information about DL data to a corresponding UE so as to inform the UE of a time/frequency domain in which the DL data is supposed to be transmitted, coding, a data size, and hybrid automatic repeat and request (HARQ)-related information. In addition, the eNB transmits UL scheduling information about UL data to a corresponding UE so as to inform the UE of a time/frequency domain which may be used by the UE, coding, a data size, and HARQ-related information. An interface for transmitting user traffic or control traffic may be used between eNBs. A core network (CN) may include the AG and a network node or the like for user registration of UEs. The AG manages the mobility of a UE on a tracking area (TA) basis. One TA includes a plurality of cells.
[29]
Although wireless communication technology has been developed to LTE based on wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA), the demands and expectations of users and service providers are on the rise. In addition, considering other radio access technologies under development, new technological evolution is required to secure high competitiveness in the future. Decrease in cost per bit, increase in service availability, flexible use of frequency bands, a simplified structure, an open interface, appropriate power consumption of UEs, and the like are required.
[30]
As more and more communication devices demand larger communication capacity, there is a need for improved mobile broadband communication compared to existing RAT. Also, massive machine type communication (MTC), which provides various services by connecting many devices and objects, is one of the major issues to be considered in the next generation communication. In addition, a communication system design considering a service/UE sensitive to reliability and latency is being discussed. The introduction of next-generation RAT, which takes into account such advanced mobile broadband communication, massive MTC (mMCT), and ultra-reliable and low latency communication (URLLC), is being discussed.
[31]
Reference will now be made in detail to the exemplary implementations of the present disclosure, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. The detailed description, which will be given below with reference to the accompanying drawings, is intended to explain exemplary implementations of the present disclosure, rather than to show the only implementations that can be implemented according to the disclosure. The following detailed description includes specific details in order to provide a thorough understanding of the present disclosure. However, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the present disclosure may be practiced without such specific details.
[32]
The following techniques, apparatuses, and systems may be applied to a variety of wireless multiple access systems. Examples of the multiple access systems include a code division multiple access (CDMA) system, a frequency division multiple access (FDMA) system, a time division multiple access (TDMA) system, an orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA) system, a single carrier frequency division multiple access (SC-FDMA) system, and a multicarrier frequency division multiple access (MC-FDMA) system. CDMA may be embodied through radio technology such as universal terrestrial radio access (UTRA) or CDMA2000. TDMA may be embodied through radio technology such as global system for mobile communications (GSM), general packet radio service (GPRS), or enhanced data rates for GSM evolution (EDGE). OFDMA may be embodied through radio technology such as institute of electrical and electronics engineers (IEEE) 802.11 (Wi-Fi), IEEE 802.16 (WiMAX), IEEE 802.20, or evolved UTRA (E-UTRA). UTRA is a part of a universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS). 3rd generation partnership project (3GPP) long term evolution (LTE) is a part of evolved UMTS (E-UMTS) using E-UTRA. 3GPP LTE employs OFDMA in DL and SC-FDMA in UL. LTE-advanced (LTE-A) is an evolved version of 3GPP LTE. For convenience of description, implementations of the present disclosure are described in regards to a 3GPP based wireless communication system. However, the technical features of the present disclosure are not limited thereto. For example, although the following detailed description is given based on a mobile communication system corresponding to a 3GPP based system, aspects of the present disclosure that are not limited to 3GPP based system are applicable to other mobile communication systems.
[33]
For example, the present disclosure is applicable to contention based communication such as Wi-Fi as well as non-contention based communication as in the 3GPP based system in which a BS allocates a DL/UL time/frequency resource to a UE and the UE receives a DL signal and transmits a UL signal according to resource allocation of the BS. In a non-contention based communication scheme, an access point (AP) or a control node for controlling the AP allocates a resource for communication between the UE and the AP, whereas, in a contention based communication scheme, a communication resource is occupied through contention between UEs which desire to access the AP. The contention based communication scheme will now be described in brief. One type of the contention based communication scheme is carrier sense multiple access (CSMA). CSMA refers to a probabilistic media access control (MAC) protocol for confirming, before a node or a communication device transmits traffic on a shared transmission medium (also called a shared channel) such as a frequency band, that there is no other traffic on the same shared transmission medium. In CSMA, a transmitting device determines whether another transmission is being performed before attempting to transmit traffic to a receiving device. In other words, the transmitting device attempts to detect presence of a carrier from another transmitting device before attempting to perform transmission. Upon sensing the carrier, the transmitting device waits for another transmission device which is performing transmission to finish transmission, before performing transmission thereof. Consequently, CSMA can be a communication scheme based on the principle of “sense before transmit” or “listen before talk”. A scheme for avoiding collision between transmitting devices in the contention based communication system using CSMA includes carrier sense multiple access with collision detection (CSMA/CD) and/or carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA). CSMA/CD is a collision detection scheme in a wired local area network (LAN) environment. In CSMA/CD, a personal computer (PC) or a server which desires to perform communication in an Ethernet environment first confirms whether communication occurs on a network and, if another device carries data on the network, the PC or the server waits and then transmits data. That is, when two or more users (e.g. PCs, UEs, etc.) simultaneously transmit data, collision occurs between simultaneous transmission and CSMA/CD is a scheme for flexibly transmitting data by monitoring collision. A transmitting device using CSMA/CD adjusts data transmission thereof by sensing data transmission performed by another device using a specific rule. CSMA/CA is a MAC protocol specified in IEEE 802.11 standards. A wireless LAN (WLAN) system conforming to IEEE 802.11 standards does not use CSMA/CD which has been used in IEEE 802.3 standards and uses CA, i.e. a collision avoidance scheme. Transmission devices always sense carrier of a network and, if the network is empty, the transmission devices wait for determined time according to locations thereof registered in a list and then transmit data. Various methods are used to determine priority of the transmission devices in the list and to reconfigure priority. In a system according to some versions of IEEE 802.11 standards, collision may occur and, in this case, a collision sensing procedure is performed. A transmission device using CSMA/CA avoids collision between data transmission thereof and data transmission of another transmission device using a specific rule.
[34]
In the present disclosure, a user equipment (UE) may be a fixed or mobile device. Examples of the UE include various devices that transmit and receive user data and/or various kinds of control information to and from a base station (BS). The UE may be referred to as a terminal equipment (TE), a mobile station (MS), a mobile terminal (MT), a user terminal (UT), a subscriber station (SS), a wireless device, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a wireless modem, a handheld device, etc. In addition, in the present disclosure, a BS generally refers to a fixed station that performs communication with a UE and/or another BS, and exchanges various kinds of data and control information with the UE and another BS. The BS may be referred to as an advanced base station (ABS), a node-B (NB), an evolved node-B (eNB), a base transceiver system (BTS), an access point (AP), a processing server (PS), etc. Especially, a BS of the UMTS is referred to as a NB, a BS of the EPC/LTE is referred to as an eNB, and a BS of the new radio (NR) system is referred to as a gNB.
[35]
In the present disclosure, a node refers to a fixed point capable of transmitting/receiving a radio signal through communication with a UE. Various types of BSs may be used as nodes irrespective of the terms thereof. For example, a BS, a node B (NB), an e-node B (eNB), a pico-cell eNB (PeNB), a home eNB (HeNB), a relay, a repeater, etc. may be a node. In addition, the node may not be a BS. For example, the node may be a radio remote head (RRH) or a radio remote unit (RRU). The RRH or RRU generally has a lower power level than a power level of a BS. Since the RRH or RRU (hereinafter, RRH/RRU) is generally connected to the BS through a dedicated line such as an optical cable, cooperative communication between RRH/RRU and the BS can be smoothly performed in comparison with cooperative communication between BSs connected by a radio line. At least one antenna is installed per node. The antenna may include a physical antenna or an antenna port or a virtual antenna.
[36]
In the present disclosure, a cell refers to a prescribed geographical area to which one or more nodes provide a communication service. Accordingly, in the present disclosure, communicating with a specific cell may include communicating with a BS or a node which provides a communication service to the specific cell. In addition, a DL/UL signal of a specific cell refers to a DL/UL signal from/to a BS or a node which provides a communication service to the specific cell. A node providing UL/DL communication services to a UE is called a serving node and a cell to which UL/DL communication services are provided by the serving node is especially called a serving cell.
[37]
In some scenarios, a 3GPP based system implements a cell to manage radio resources and a cell associated with the radio resources is distinguished from a cell of a geographic region.
[38]
A “cell” of a geographic region may be understood as coverage within which a node can provide service using a carrier and a “cell” of a radio resource is associated with bandwidth (BW) which is a frequency range configured by the carrier. Since DL coverage, which is a range within which the node is capable of transmitting a valid signal, and UL coverage, which is a range within which the node is capable of receiving the valid signal from the UE, depends upon a carrier carrying the signal, the coverage of the node may be associated with coverage of the “cell” of a radio resource used by the node. Accordingly, the term “cell” may be used to indicate service coverage of the node sometimes, a radio resource at other times, or a range that a signal using a radio resource can reach with valid strength at other times.
[39]
In some scenarios, the recent 3GPP based wireless communication standard implements a cell to manage radio resources. The “cell” associated with the radio resources utilizes a combination of downlink resources and uplink resources, for example, a combination of DL component carrier (CC) and UL CC. The cell may be configured by downlink resources only, or may be configured by downlink resources and uplink resources. If carrier aggregation is supported, linkage between a carrier frequency of the downlink resources (or DL CC) and a carrier frequency of the uplink resources (or UL CC) may be indicated by system information. For example, combination of the DL resources and the UL resources may be indicated by linkage of system information block type 2 (SIB2). In this case, the carrier frequency may be a center frequency of each cell or CC. A cell operating on a primary frequency may be referred to as a primary cell (Pcell) or PCC, and a cell operating on a secondary frequency may be referred to as a secondary cell (Scell) or SCC. The carrier corresponding to the Pcell on downlink will be referred to as a downlink primary CC (DL PCC), and the carrier corresponding to the Pcell on uplink will be referred to as an uplink primary CC (UL PCC). A Scell refers to a cell that may be configured after completion of radio resource control (RRC) connection establishment and used to provide additional radio resources. The Scell may form a set of serving cells for the UE together with the Pcell in accordance with capabilities of the UE. The carrier corresponding to the Scell on the downlink will be referred to as downlink secondary CC (DL SCC), and the carrier corresponding to the Scell on the uplink will be referred to as uplink secondary CC (UL SCC). Although the UE is in RRC-CONNECTED state, if it is not configured by carrier aggregation or does not support carrier aggregation, a single serving cell configured by the Pcell only exists.
[40]
In the present disclosure, “PDCCH” refers to a PDCCH, an EPDCCH (in subframes when configured), a MTC PDCCH (MPDCCH), for an RN with R-PDCCH configured and not suspended, to the R-PDCCH or, for NB-IoT to the narrowband PDCCH (NPDCCH).
[41]
In the present disclosure, monitoring a channel refers to attempting to decode the channel. For example, monitoring a PDCCH refers to attempting to decode PDCCH(s) (or PDCCH candidates).
[42]
For terms and technologies which are not specifically described among the terms of and technologies employed in this specification, 3GPP LTE/LTE-A standard documents, for example, 3GPP TS 36.211, 3GPP TS 36.212, 3GPP TS 36.213, 3GPP TS 36.300, 3GPP TS 36.321, 3GPP TS 36.322, 3GPP TS 36.323 and 3GPP TS 36.331, and 3GPP NR standard documents, for example, 3GPP TS 38.211, 3GPP TS 38.213, 3GPP TS 38.214, 3GPP TS 38.300, 3GPP TS 38.321, 3GPP TS 38.322, 3GPP TS 38.323 and 3GPP TS 38.331 may be referenced.
[43]
FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an example of an evolved universal terrestrial radio access network (E-UTRAN). The E-UMTS may be also referred to as an LTE system. The communication network is widely deployed to provide a variety of communication services such as voice (VoIP) through IMS and packet data.
[44]
As illustrated in FIG. 2, the E-UMTS network includes an evolved UMTS terrestrial radio access network (E-UTRAN), an Evolved Packet Core (EPC) and one or more user equipment. The E-UTRAN may include one or more evolved NodeB (eNodeB) 20, and a plurality of user equipments (UE) 10 may be located in one cell. One or more E-UTRAN mobility management entity (MME)/system architecture evolution (SAE) gateways 30 may be positioned at the end of the network and connected to an external network.
[45]
As used herein, “downlink” refers to communication from BS 20 to UE 10, and “uplink” refers to communication from the UE to a BS.
[46]
FIG. 3 is a block diagram depicting an example of an architecture of a typical E-UTRAN and a typical EPC.
[47]
As illustrated in FIG. 3, an eNB 20 provides end points of a user plane and a control plane to the UE 10. MME/SAE gateway 30 provides an end point of a session and mobility management function for UE 10. The eNB and MME/SAE gateway may be connected via an S1 interface.
[48]
The eNB 20 is generally a fixed station that communicates with a UE 10, and may also be referred to as a base station (BS) or an access point. One eNB 20 may be deployed per cell. An interface for transmitting user traffic or control traffic may be used between eNBs 20.
[49]
The MME provides various functions including NAS signaling to eNBs 20, NAS signaling security, access stratum (AS) Security control, Inter CN node signaling for mobility between 3GPP access networks, Idle mode UE Reachability (including control and execution of paging retransmission), Tracking Area list management (for UE in idle and active mode), PDN GW and Serving GW selection, MME selection for handovers with MME change, SGSN selection for handovers to 2G or 3G 3GPP access networks, roaming, authentication, bearer management functions including dedicated bearer establishment, support for PWS (which includes ETWS and CMAS) message transmission. The SAE gateway host provides assorted functions including Per-user based packet filtering (by e.g. deep packet inspection), Lawful Interception, UE IP address allocation, Transport level packet marking in the downlink, UL and DL service level charging, gating and rate enforcement, DL rate enforcement based on APN-AMBR. For clarity MME/SAE gateway 30 will be referred to herein simply as a “gateway,” but it is understood that this entity includes both an MME and an SAE gateway.
[50]
A plurality of nodes may be connected between eNB 20 and gateway 30 via the S1 interface. The eNBs 20 may be connected to each other via an X2 interface and neighboring eNBs may have a meshed network structure that has the X2 interface.
[51]
As illustrated, eNB 20 may perform functions of selection for gateway 30, routing toward the gateway during a Radio Resource Control (RRC) activation, scheduling and transmitting of paging messages, scheduling and transmitting of Broadcast Channel (BCCH) information, dynamic allocation of resources to UEs 10 in both uplink and downlink, configuration and provisioning of eNB measurements, radio bearer control, radio admission control (RAC), and connection mobility control in LTE_ACTIVE state. In the EPC, and as noted above, gateway 30 may perform functions of paging origination, LTE-IDLE state management, ciphering of the user plane, System Architecture Evolution (SAE) bearer control, and ciphering and integrity protection of Non-Access Stratum (NAS) signaling.
[52]
The EPC includes a mobility management entity (MME), a serving-gateway (S-GW), and a packet data network-gateway (PDN-GW). The MME has information about connections and capabilities of UEs, mainly for use in managing the mobility of the UEs. The S-GW is a gateway having the E-UTRAN as an end point, and the PDN-GW is a gateway having a packet data network (PDN) as an end point.
[53]
FIG. 4 is a diagram showing an example of a control plane and a user plane of a radio interface protocol between a UE and an E-UTRAN based on a 3GPP radio access network standard. The control plane refers to a path used for transmitting control messages used for managing a call between the UE and the E-UTRAN. The user plane refers to a path used for transmitting data generated in an application layer, e.g., voice data or Internet packet data.
[54]
Layer 1 (i.e. L1) of the 3GPP LTE/LTE-A system is corresponding to a physical layer. A physical (PHY) layer of a first layer (Layer 1 or L1) provides an information transfer service to a higher layer using a physical channel. The PHY layer is connected to a medium access control (MAC) layer located on the higher layer via a transport channel. Data is transported between the MAC layer and the PHY layer via the transport channel. Data is transported between a physical layer of a transmitting side and a physical layer of a receiving side via physical channels. The physical channels use time and frequency as radio resources. In detail, the physical channel is modulated using an orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA) scheme in downlink and is modulated using a single carrier frequency division multiple access (SC-FDMA) scheme in uplink.
[55]
Layer 2 (i.e. L2) of the 3GPP LTE/LTE-A system is split into the following sublayers: Medium Access Control (MAC), Radio Link Control (RLC) and Packet Data Convergence Protocol (PDCP). The MAC layer of a second layer (Layer 2 or L2) provides a service to a radio link control (RLC) layer of a higher layer via a logical channel. The RLC layer of the second layer supports reliable data transmission. A function of the RLC layer may be implemented by a functional block of the MAC layer. A packet data convergence protocol (PDCP) layer of the second layer performs a header compression function to reduce unnecessary control information for efficient transmission of an Internet protocol (IP) packet such as an IP version 4 (IPv4) packet or an IP version 6 (IPv6) packet in a radio interface having a relatively small bandwidth.
[56]
The main services and functions of the MAC sublayer include: mapping between logical channels and transport channels; multiplexing/demultiplexing of MAC SDUs belonging to one or different logical channels into/from transport blocks (TB) delivered to/from the physical layer on transport channels; scheduling information reporting; error correction through HARQ; priority handling between logical channels of one UE; priority handling between UEs by dynamic scheduling; MBMS service identification; transport format selection; and padding.
[57]
The main services and functions of the RLC sublayer include: transfer of upper layer protocol data units (PDUs); error correction through ARQ (only for acknowledged mode (AM) data transfer); concatenation, segmentation and reassembly of RLC service data units (SDUs) (only for unacknowledged mode (UM) and acknowledged mode (AM) data transfer); re-segmentation of RLC data PDUs (only for AM data transfer); reordering of RLC data PDUs (only for UM and AM data transfer); duplicate detection (only for UM and AM data transfer); protocol error detection (only for AM data transfer); RLC SDU discard (only for UM and AM data transfer); and RLC re-establishment, except for a NB-IoT UE that only uses Control Plane CIoT EPS optimizations.
[58]
The main services and functions of the PDCP sublayer for the user plane include: header compression and decompression (ROHC only); transfer of user data; in-sequence delivery of upper layer PDUs at PDCP re-establishment procedure for RLC AM; for split bearers in DC and LWA bearers (only support for RLC AM), PDCP PDU routing for transmission and PDCP PDU reordering for reception; duplicate detection of lower layer SDUs at PDCP re-establishment procedure for RLC AM; retransmission of PDCP SDUs at handover and, for split bearers in DC and LWA bearers, of PDCP PDUs at PDCP data-recovery procedure, for RLC AM; ciphering and deciphering; timer-based SDU discard in uplink. The main services and functions of the PDCP for the control plane include: ciphering and integrity protection; and transfer of control plane data. For split and LWA bearers, PDCP supports routing and reordering. For DRBs mapped on RLC AM and for LWA bearers, the PDCP entity uses the reordering function when the PDCP entity is associated with two AM RLC entities, when the PDCP entity is configured for a LWA bearer; or when the PDCP entity is associated with one AM RLC entity after it was, according to the most recent reconfiguration, associated with two AM RLC entities or configured for a LWA bearer without performing PDCP re-establishment.
[59]
Layer 3 (i.e. L3) of the LTE/LTE-A system includes the following sublayers: Radio Resource Control (RRC) and Non Access Stratum (NAS). A radio resource control (RRC) layer located at the bottom of a third layer is defined only in the control plane. The RRC layer controls logical channels, transport channels, and physical channels in relation to configuration, re-configuration, and release of radio bearers (RBs). An RB refers to a service that the second layer provides for data transmission between the UE and the E-UTRAN. To this end, the RRC layer of the UE and the RRC layer of the E-UTRAN exchange RRC messages with each other. The non-access stratum (NAS) layer positioned over the RRC layer performs functions such as session management and mobility management.
[60]
Radio bearers are roughly classified into (user) data radio bearers (DRBs) and signaling radio bearers (SRBs). SRBs are defined as radio bearers (RBs) that are used only for the transmission of RRC and NAS messages.
[61]
In LTE, one cell of the eNB is set to operate in one of bandwidths such as 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, and 20 MHz and provides a downlink or uplink transmission service to a plurality of UEs in the bandwidth. Different cells may be set to provide different bandwidths.
[62]
Downlink transport channels for transmission of data from the E-UTRAN to the UE include a broadcast channel (BCH) for transmission of system information, a paging channel (PCH) for transmission of paging messages, and a downlink shared channel (SCH) for transmission of user traffic or control messages. Traffic or control messages of a downlink multicast or broadcast service may be transmitted through the downlink SCH and may also be transmitted through a separate downlink multicast channel (MCH).
[63]
Uplink transport channels for transmission of data from the UE to the E-UTRAN include a random access channel (RACH) for transmission of initial control messages and an uplink SCH for transmission of user traffic or control messages. Logical channels that are defined above the transport channels and mapped to the transport channels include a broadcast control channel (BCCH), a paging control channel (PCCH), a common control channel (CCCH), a multicast control channel (MCCH), and a multicast traffic channel (MTCH).
[64]
FIG. 5 is a diagram showing an example of a physical channel structure used in an E-UMTS system. A physical channel includes several subframes on a time axis and several subcarriers on a frequency axis. Here, one subframe includes a plurality of symbols on the time axis. One subframe includes a plurality of resource blocks and one resource block includes a plurality of symbols and a plurality of subcarriers. In addition, each subframe may use certain subcarriers of certain symbols (e.g., a first symbol) of a subframe for a physical downlink control channel (PDCCH), that is, an L1/L2 control channel. The PDCCH carries scheduling assignments and other control information. In FIG. 5, an L1/L2 control information transmission area (PDCCH) and a data area (PDSCH) are shown. In one implementation, a radio frame of 10ms is used and one radio frame includes 10 subframes. In addition, in LTE, one subframe includes two consecutive slots. The length of one slot may be 0.5ms. In addition, one subframe includes a plurality of OFDM symbols and a portion (e.g., a first symbol) of the plurality of OFDM symbols may be used for transmitting the L1/L2 control information.
[65]
A time interval in which one subframe is transmitted is defined as a transmission time interval (TTI). Time resources may be distinguished by a radio frame number (or radio frame index), a subframe number (or subframe index), a slot number (or slot index), and the like. TTI refers to an interval during which data may be scheduled. For example, in the 3GPP LTE/LTE-A system, an opportunity of transmission of an UL grant or a DL grant is present every 1 ms, and the UL/DL grant opportunity does not exists several times in less than 1 ms. Therefore, the TTI in the legacy 3GPP LTE/LTE-A system is 1ms.
[66]
A base station and a UE mostly transmit/receive data via a PDSCH, which is a physical channel, using a downlink shared channel (DL-SCH) which is a transmission channel, except a certain control signal or certain service data. Information indicating to which UE (one or a plurality of UEs) PDSCH data is transmitted and how the UE receive and decode PDSCH data is transmitted in a state of being included in the PDCCH.
[67]
For example, in one implementation, a certain PDCCH is CRC-masked with a radio network temporary identity (RNTI) “A” and information about data is transmitted using a radio resource “B” (e.g., a frequency location) and transmission format information “C” (e.g., a transmission block size, modulation, coding information or the like) via a certain subframe. Then, one or more UEs located in a cell monitor the PDCCH using its RNTI information. And, a specific UE with RNTI “A” reads the PDCCH and then receives the PDSCH indicated by B and C in the PDCCH information. In the present disclosure, a PDCCH addressed to an RNTI refers to the PDCCH being cyclic redundancy check masked (CRC-masked) with the RNTI. A UE may attempt to decode a PDCCH using the certain RNTI if the UE is monitoring a PDCCH addressed to the certain RNTI.
[68]
A fully mobile and connected society is expected in the near future, which will be characterized by a tremendous amount of growth in connectivity, traffic volume and a much broader range of usage scenarios. Some typical trends include explosive growth of data traffic, great increase of connected devices and continuous emergence of new services. Besides the market requirements, the mobile communication society itself also requires a sustainable development of the eco-system, which produces the needs to further improve system efficiencies, such as spectrum efficiency, energy efficiency, operational efficiency, and cost efficiency. To meet the above ever-increasing requirements from market and mobile communication society, next generation access technologies are expected to emerge in the near future.
[69]
Building upon its success of IMT-2000 (3G) and IMT-Advanced (4G), 3GPP has been devoting its effort to IMT-2020 (5G) development since September 2015. 5G New Radio (NR) is expected to expand and support diverse use case scenarios and applications that will continue beyond the current IMT-Advanced standard, for instance, enhanced Mobile Broadband (eMBB), Ultra Reliable Low Latency Communication (URLLC) and massive Machine Type Communication (mMTC). eMBB is targeting high data rate mobile broadband services, such as seamless data access both indoors and outdoors, and AR/VR applications; URLLC is defined for applications that have stringent latency and reliability requirements, such as vehicular communications that can enable autonomous driving and control network in industrial plants; mMTC is the basis for connectivity in IoT, which allows for infrastructure management, environmental monitoring, and healthcare applications.
[70]
FIG. 6 illustrates an example of protocol stacks of a next generation wireless communication system. In particular, FIG. 6(a) illustrates an example of a radio interface user plane protocol stack between a UE and a gNB and FIG. 6(b) illustrates an example of a radio interface control plane protocol stack between a UE and a gNB.
[71]
The control plane refers to a path through which control messages used to manage call by a UE and a network are transported. The user plane refers to a path through which data generated in an application layer, for example, voice data or Internet packet data are transported.
[72]
Referring to FIG. 6(a), the user plane protocol stack may be divided into a first layer (Layer 1) (i.e., a physical layer (PHY) layer) and a second layer (Layer 2).
[73]
Referring to FIG. 6(b), the control plane protocol stack may be divided into Layer 1 (i.e., a PHY layer), Layer 2, Layer 3 (e.g., a radio resource control (RRC) layer), and a non-access stratum (NAS) layer.
[74]
The overall protocol stack architecture for the NR system might be similar to that of the LTE/LTE-A system, but some functionalities of the protocol stacks of the LTE/LTE-A system should be modified in the NR system in order to resolve the weakness or drawback of LTE. RAN WG2 for NR is in charge of the radio interface architecture and protocols. The new functionalities of the control plane include the following: on-demand system information delivery to reduce energy consumption and mitigate interference, two-level (i.e. Radio Resource Control (RRC) and Medium Access Control (MAC)) mobility to implement seamless handover, beam based mobility management to accommodate high frequency, RRC inactive state to reduce state transition latency and improve UE battery life. The new functionalities of the user plane aim at latency reduction by optimizing existing functionalities, such as concatenation and reordering relocation, and RLC out of order delivery. In addition, a new user plane AS protocol layer named as Service Data Adaptation Protocol (SDAP) has been introduced to handle flow-based Quality of Service (QoS) framework in RAN, such as mapping between QoS flow and a data radio bearer, and QoS flow ID marking. Hereinafter the layer 2 according to the current agreements for NR is briefly discussed.
[75]
The layer 2 of NR is split into the following sublayers: Medium Access Control (MAC), Radio Link Control (RLC), Packet Data Convergence Protocol (PDCP) and Service Data Adaptation Protocol (SDAP). The physical layer offers to the MAC sublayer transport channels, the MAC sublayer offers to the RLC sublayer logical channels, the RLC sublayer offers to the PDCP sublayer RLC channels, the PDCP sublayer offers to the SDAP sublayer radio bearers, and the SDAP sublayer offers to 5GC QoS flows. Radio bearers are categorized into two groups: data radio bearers (DRB) for user plane data and signalling radio bearers (SRB) for control plane data.
[76]
The main services and functions of the MAC sublayer of NR include: mapping between logical channels and transport channels; multiplexing/demultiplexing of MAC SDUs belonging to one or different logical channels into/from transport blocks (TB) delivered to/from the physical layer on transport channels; scheduling information reporting; error correction through HARQ (one HARQ entity per carrier in case of carrier aggregation); priority handling between UEs by dynamic scheduling; priority handling between logical channels of one UE by logical channel prioritization; and padding. A single MAC entity can support one or multiple numerologies and/or transmission timings, and mapping restrictions in logical channel prioritisation controls which numerology and/or transmission timing a logical channel can use.
[77]
The RLC sublayer of NR supports three transmission modes: Transparent Mode (TM); Unacknowledged Mode (UM); Acknowledged Mode (AM). The RLC configuration is per logical channel with no dependency on numerologies and/or TTI durations, and ARQ can operate on any of the numerologies and/or TTI durations the logical channel is configured with. For SRB0, paging and broadcast system information, TM mode is used. For other SRBs AM mode used. For DRBs, either UM or AM mode are used. The main services and functions of the RLC sublayer depend on the transmission mode and include: transfer of upper layer PDUs; sequence numbering independent of the one in PDCP (UM and AM); error correction through ARQ (AM only); segmentation (AM and UM) and re-segmentation (AM only) of RLC SDUs; Reassembly of SDU (AM and UM); duplicate detection (AM only); RLC SDU discard (AM and UM); RLC re-establishment; and protocol error detection (AM only). The ARQ within the RLC sublayer of NR has the following characteristics: ARQ retransmits RLC PDUs or RLC PDU segments based on RLC status reports; polling for RLC status report is used when needed by RLC; and RLC receiver can also trigger RLC status report after detecting a missing RLC PDU or RLC PDU segment.
[78]
The main services and functions of the PDCP sublayer of NR for the user plane include: sequence numbering; header compression and decompression (ROHC only); transfer of user data; reordering and duplicate detection; PDCP PDU routing (in case of split bearers); retransmission of PDCP SDUs; ciphering, deciphering and integrity protection; PDCP SDU discard; PDCP re-establishment and data recovery for RLC AM; and duplication of PDCP PDUs. The main services and functions of the PDCP sublayer of NR for the control plane include: sequence numbering; ciphering, deciphering and integrity protection; transfer of control plane data; reordering and duplicate detection; and duplication of PDCP PDUs.
[79]
The main services and functions of SDAP include: mapping between a QoS flow and a data radio bearer; marking QoS flow ID (QFI) in both DL and UL packets. A single protocol entity of SDAP is configured for each individual PDU session. Compared to LTE’s QoS framework, which is bearer-based, the 5G system adopts the QoS flow-based framework. The QoS flow-based framework enables flexible mapping of QoS flow to DRB by decoupling QoS flow and the radio bearer, allowing more flexible QoS characteristic configuration.
[80]
The main services and functions of RRC sublayer of NR include: broadcast of system information related to access stratum (AS) and non-access stratum (NAS); paging initiated by a 5GC or an NG-RAN; establishment, maintenance, and release of RRC connection between a UE and a NG-RAN (which further includes modification and release of carrier aggregation and further includes modification and release of the DC between an E-UTRAN and an NR or in the NR; a security function including key management; establishment, configuration, maintenance, and release of SRB(s) and DRB(s); handover and context transfer; UE cell selection and re-release and control of cell selection/re-selection; a mobility function including mobility between RATs; a QoS management function, UE measurement report, and report control; detection of radio link failure and discovery from radio link failure; and NAS message transfer to a UE from a NAS and NAS message transfer to the NAS from the UE.
[81]
Hereinafter, 5G communication system is briefly introduced.
[82]
Three main requirement categories for 5G include (1) a category of enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB), (2) a category of massive machine type communication (mMTC), and (3) a category of ultra-reliable and low latency communications (URLLC).
[83]
Partial use cases may require a plurality of categories for optimization and other use cases may focus only upon one key performance indicator (KPI). 5G supports such various use cases using a flexible and reliable method.
[84]
eMBB far surpasses basic mobile Internet access and covers abundant bidirectional work and media and entertainment applications in cloud and augmented reality. Data is one of 5G core motive forces and, in a 5G era, a dedicated voice service may not be provided for the first time. In 5G, it is expected that voice will be simply processed as an application program using data connection provided by a communication system. Main causes for increased traffic volume are due to an increase in the size of content and an increase in the number of applications requiring high data transmission rate. A streaming service (of audio and video), conversational video, and mobile Internet access will be more widely used as more devices are connected to the Internet. These many application programs require connectivity of an always turned-on state in order to push real-time information and alarm for users. Cloud storage and applications are rapidly increasing in a mobile communication platform and may be applied to both work and entertainment. The cloud storage is a special use case which accelerates growth of uplink data transmission rate. 5G is also used for remote work of cloud. When a tactile interface is used, 5G demands much lower end-to-end latency to maintain user good experience. Entertainment, for example, cloud gaming and video streaming, is another core element which increases demand for mobile broadband capability. Entertainment is essential for a smartphone and a tablet in any place including high mobility environments such as a train, a vehicle, and an airplane. Other use cases are augmented reality for entertainment and information search. In this case, the augmented reality requires very low latency and instantaneous data volume.
[85]
In addition, one of the most expected 5G use cases relates a function capable of smoothly connecting embedded sensors in all fields, i.e., mMTC. It is expected that the number of potential IoT devices will reach 204 hundred million up to the year of 2020. An industrial IoT is one of categories of performing a main role enabling a smart city, asset tracking, smart utility, agriculture, and security infrastructure through 5G.
[86]
URLLC includes a new service that will change industry through remote control of main infrastructure and an ultra-reliable/available low-latency link such as a self-driving vehicle. A level of reliability and latency is essential to control a smart grid, automatize industry, achieve robotics, and control and adjust a drone.
[87]
5G is a means of providing streaming evaluated as a few hundred megabits per second to gigabits per second and may complement fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) and cable-based broadband (or DOCSIS). Such fast speed is needed to deliver TV in resolution of 4K or more (6K, 8K, and more), as well as virtual reality and augmented reality. Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) applications include almost immersive sports games. A specific application program may require a special network configuration. For example, for VR games, gaming companies need to incorporate a core server into an edge network server of a network operator in order to minimize latency.
[88]
Automotive is expected to be a new important motivated force in 5G together with many use cases for mobile communication for vehicles. For example, entertainment for passengers requires high simultaneous capacity and mobile broadband with high mobility. This is because future users continue to expect connection of high quality regardless of their locations and speeds. Another use case of an automotive field is an AR dashboard. The AR dashboard causes a driver to identify an object in the dark in addition to an object seen from a front window and displays a distance from the object and a movement of the object by overlapping information talking to the driver. In the future, a wireless module enables communication between vehicles, information exchange between a vehicle and supporting infrastructure, and information exchange between a vehicle and other connected devices (e.g., devices accompanied by a pedestrian). A safety system guides alternative courses of a behavior so that a driver may drive more safely drive, thereby lowering the danger of an accident. The next stage will be a remotely controlled or self-driven vehicle. This requires very high reliability and very fast communication between different self-driven vehicles and between a vehicle and infrastructure. In the future, a self-driven vehicle will perform all driving activities and a driver will focus only upon abnormal traffic that the vehicle cannot identify. Technical requirements of a self-driven vehicle demand ultra-low latency and ultra-high reliability so that traffic safety is increased to a level that cannot be achieved by human being.
[89]
A smart city and a smart home/building mentioned as a smart society will be embedded in a high-density wireless sensor network. A distributed network of an intelligent sensor will identify conditions for costs and energy-efficient maintenance of a city or a home. Similar configurations may be performed for respective households. All of temperature sensors, window and heating controllers, burglar alarms, and home appliances are wirelessly connected. Many of these sensors are typically low in data transmission rate, power, and cost. However, real-time HD video may be demanded by a specific type of device to perform monitoring.
[90]
Consumption and distribution of energy including heat or gas is distributed at a higher level so that automated control of the distribution sensor network is demanded. The smart grid collects information and connects the sensors to each other using digital information and communication technology so as to act according to the collected information. Since this information may include behaviors of a supply company and a consumer, the smart grid may improve distribution of fuels such as electricity by a method having efficiency, reliability, economic feasibility, production sustainability, and automation. The smart grid may also be regarded as another sensor network having low latency.
[91]
Mission critical application (e.g. e-health) is one of 5G use scenarios. A health part contains many application programs capable of enjoying benefit of mobile communication. A communication system may support remote treatment that provides clinical treatment in a faraway place. Remote treatment may aid in reducing a barrier against distance and improve access to medical services that cannot be continuously available in a faraway rural area. Remote treatment is also used to perform important treatment and save lives in an emergency situation. The wireless sensor network based on mobile communication may provide remote monitoring and sensors for parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure.
[92]
Wireless and mobile communication gradually becomes important in the field of an industrial application. Wiring is high in installation and maintenance cost. Therefore, a possibility of replacing a cable with reconstructible wireless links is an attractive opportunity in many industrial fields. However, in order to achieve this replacement, it is necessary for wireless connection to be established with latency, reliability, and capacity similar to those of the cable and management of wireless connection needs to be simplified. Low latency and a very low error probability are new requirements when connection to 5G is needed.
[93]
Logistics and freight tracking are important use cases for mobile communication that enables inventory and package tracking anywhere using a location-based information system. The use cases of logistics and freight typically demand low data rate but require location information with a wide range and reliability.
[94]
FIG. 7 illustrates a data flow example at a transmitting device in the NR system.
[95]
In FIG. 7, an RB denotes a radio bearer. Referring to FIG. 7, a transport block is generated by MAC by concatenating two RLC PDUs from RBx and one RLC PDU from RBy. In FIG. 7, the two RLC PDUs from RBx each corresponds to one IP packet (n and n+1) while the RLC PDU from RBy is a segment of an IP packet (m). In NR, a RLC SDU segment can be located in the beginning part of a MAC PDU and/or in the ending part of the MAC PDU. The MAC PDU is transmitted/received using radio resources through a physical layer to/from an external device.
[96]
FIG. 8 illustrates an example of a slot structure available in a new radio access technology (NR).
[97]
To reduce or minimize data transmission latency, in a 5G new RAT, a slot structure in which a control channel and a data channel are time-division-multiplexed is considered.
[98]
In the example of FIG. 8, the hatched area represents the transmission region of a DL control channel (e.g., PDCCH) carrying the DCI, and the black area represents the transmission region of a UL control channel (e.g., PUCCH) carrying the UCI. Here, the DCI is control information that the gNB transmits to the UE. The DCI may include information on cell configuration that the UE should know, DL specific information such as DL scheduling, and UL specific information such as UL grant. The UCI is control information that the UE transmits to the gNB. The UCI may include a HARQ ACK/NACK report on the DL data, a CSI report on the DL channel status, and a scheduling request (SR).
[99]
In the example of FIG. 8, the region of symbols from symbol index 1 to symbol index 12 may be used for transmission of a physical channel (e.g., a PDSCH) carrying downlink data, or may be used for transmission of a physical channel (e.g., PUSCH) carrying uplink data. According to the slot structure of FIG. 8, DL transmission and UL transmission may be sequentially performed in one slot, and thus transmission/reception of DL data and reception/transmission of UL ACK/NACK for the DL data may be performed in one slot. As a result, the time taken to retransmit data when a data transmission error occurs may be reduced, thereby minimizing the latency of final data transmission.
[100]
In such a slot structure, a time gap is needed for the process of switching from the transmission mode to the reception mode or from the reception mode to the transmission mode of the gNB and UE. On behalf of the process of switching between the transmission mode and the reception mode, some OFDM symbols at the time of switching from DL to UL in the slot structure are set as a guard period (GP).
[101]
In the legacy LTE/LTE-A system, a DL control channel is time-division-multiplexed with a data channel and a PDCCH, which is a control channel, is transmitted throughout an entire system band. However, in the new RAT, it is expected that a bandwidth of one system reaches approximately a minimum of 100 MHz and it is difficult to distribute the control channel throughout the entire band for transmission of the control channel. For data transmission/reception of a UE, if the entire band is monitored to receive the DL control channel, this may cause increase in battery consumption of the UE and deterioration in efficiency. Accordingly, in the present disclosure, the DL control channel may be locally transmitted or distributively transmitted in a partial frequency band in a system band, i.e., a channel band.
[102]
In the NR system, the basic transmission unit is a slot. A duration of the slot includes 14 symbols having a normal cyclic prefix (CP) or 12 symbols having an extended CP. In addition, the slot is scaled in time as a function of a used subcarrier spacing.
[103]
Hereinafter, Buffer Status reporting (BSR) procedure in the NR system is described.
[104]
The BSR procedure is used to provide the serving gNB with information about UL data volume in the MAC entity. RRC configures the following parameters to control the BSR:
[105]
- periodicBSR-Timer;
[106]
- retxBSR-Timer;
[107]
- logicalChannelSR-DelayTimerApplied;
[108]
- logicalChannelSR-DelayTimer;
[109]
- logicalChannelSR-Mask;
[110]
- logicalChannelGroup.
[111]
Each logical channel may be allocated to an LCG using the logicalChannelGroup. The maximum number of LCGs is eight. The MAC entity determines the amount of UL data available for a logical channel according to the data volume calculation procedure.
[112]
Hereinafter, Logical channel prioritization in the NR system is described.
[113]
The Logical Channel Prioritization procedure is applied when a new transmission is performed. RRC controls the scheduling of uplink data by signalling for each logical channel: priority where an increasing priority value indicates a lower priority level, prioritisedBitRate which sets the Prioritized Bit Rate (PBR), bucketSizeDuration which sets the Bucket Size Duration (BSD).
[114]
The MAC entity shall maintain a variable Bj for each logical channel j. Bj shall be initialized to zero when the related logical channel is established, and incremented by the product PBR × TTI duration for each TTI, where PBR is Prioritized Bit Rate of logical channel j. However, the value of Bj can never exceed the bucket size and if the value of Bj is larger than the bucket size of logical channel j, it shall be set to the bucket size. The bucket size of a logical channel is equal to PBR × BSD, where PBR and BSD are configured by upper layers.
[115]
The MAC entity shall perform the following Logical Channel Prioritization procedure when a new transmission is performed:
[116]
- The MAC entity shall allocate resources to the logical channels in the following steps 1-3:
[117]
Step 1: All the logical channels with Bj > 0 are allocated resources in a decreasing priority order. If the PBR of a logical channel is set to “infinity”, the MAC entity shall allocate resources for all the data that is available for transmission on the logical channel before meeting the PBR of the lower priority logical channel(s);
[118]
Step 2: the MAC entity shall decrement Bj by the total size of MAC SDUs served to logical channel j in Step 1. Especially, the value of Bj can be negative.
[119]
Step 3: if any resources remain, all the logical channels are served in a strict decreasing priority order (regardless of the value of Bj) until either the data for that logical channel or the UL grant is exhausted, whichever comes first. Logical channels configured with equal priority should be served equally.
[120]
- The UE shall also follow the rules (1)-(4) below during the scheduling procedures above
[121]
(1) the UE should not segment an RLC SDU (or partially transmitted SDU or retransmitted RLC PDU) if the whole SDU (or partially transmitted SDU or retransmitted RLC PDU) fits into the remaining resources of the associated MAC entity.
[122]
(2) if the UE segments an RLC SDU from the logical channel, it shall maximize the size of the segment to fill the grant of the associated MAC entity as much as possible.
[123]
(3) the UE should maximise the transmission of data.
[124]
(4) if the MAC entity is given an UL grant size that is equal to or larger than 4 bytes while having data available for transmission, the MAC entity shall not transmit only padding BSR and/or padding.
[125]
The MAC entity shall not generate a MAC PDU for the HARQ entity if the following conditions are satisfied:
[126]
- the MAC entity is configured with skipUplinkTxDynamic with value true and the grant indicated to the HARQ entity was addressed to a C-RNTI, or the grant indicated to the HARQ entity is a configured uplink grant; and
[127]
- there is no aperiodic CSI requested for this PUSCH transmission; and
[128]
- the MAC PDU includes zero MAC SDUs; and
[129]
- the MAC PDU includes only the periodic BSR and there is no data available for any LCG, or the MAC PDU includes only the padding BSR.
[130]
Logical channels shall be prioritised in accordance with the following order (highest priority listed first):
[131]
a) C-RNTI MAC CE or data from UL-CCCH;
[132]
b) Configured Grant Confirmation MAC CE;
[133]
c) MAC CE for BSR, with exception of BSR included for padding;
[134]
d) Single Entry PHR MAC CE or Multiple Entry PHR MAC CE;
[135]
e) data from any Logical Channel, except data from UL-CCCH;
[136]
f) MAC CE for Recommended bit rate query;
[137]
g) MAC CE for BSR included for padding.
[138]
In the LTE system and the NR system, Logical channel group (LCG) is used to trigger and report a buffer size regarding a logical channel. In specific, if a logical channel belongs to an LCG, the new data arrival for that logical channel triggers a BSR whereas a logical channel not belonging to any LCG does not trigger a BSR even if the new data arrives for that logical channel. The reason was that:
[139]
- The logical channel not belonging to any LCG is likely to be of lower priority so that there is no need to trigger a BSR. For these kind of lower priority logical channels, it is sufficient to transmit the data when the received UL grant remains after including all higher priority logical channel data.
[140]
- The scheduler may be able to know the characteristics of the traffic, e.g., data size, periodicity, so that the UE waits until it is scheduled rather than triggering or reporting a BSR unnecessarily.
[141]
In prior art, the MAC entity may cancel all triggered BSRs when the UL grant(s) can accommodate all pending data available for transmission but is not sufficient to additionally accommodate the BSR MAC CE plus its subheader. It means that the MAC entity shall not cancel any triggered BSR if the UL grant can accommodate only a part of pending data. In addition, as long as a BSR is pending, the MAC entity shall prioritize the BSR MAC CE over logical channel data, except for CCCH. The intention in the prior art is to request further UL grant(s) to transmit remaining pending data.
[142]
Similarly, as long as the power headroom report (PHR) is pending, the MAC entity includes PHR MAC CE into a new MAC PDU, if possible, while it takes higher priority than data transmission (e.g., data from any logical channel) except for CCCH (e.g., data from UL-CCCH).
[143]
Accordingly, the MAC entity may not be able to include ultra-reliable low latency communication (URLLC) traffic if higher priority of MAC subPDU, e.g, MAC subPDU including BSR MAC CE or PHR MAC CE, consumes all UL resource of the received UL grant.
[144]
In support of URLLC traffic, it is important that URLLC traffic meets the latency requirement while there is no strict latency requirement for scheduling assistant information, e.g., for BSR/PHR. Therefore, it would not be desirable to take the opportunity of URLLC traffic transmission away due to less time-sensitive scheduling assistant information (e.g. BSR/PHR).
[145]
According to the present disclosure, it is suggested that the MAC entity should cancel a pending BSR if an UL grant can accommodate a part of pending data available for transmission. Specifically, when there are pending BSR(s) and there are multiple logical channels having pending data, the MAC entity cancels all pending BSR(s) if the UL grant can accommodate pending data for a specific logical channel but is not sufficient to additionally accommodate the BSR MAC CE plus its MAC subheader, where the BSR MAC CE is to report buffer size regarding multiple logical channels. It means that the MAC entity cancels all pending BSR(s) even if the UL grant cannot accommodate all pending data available for the UE.
[146]
Hereinafter, the UE behavior or MAC entity at the UE behavior according to the present disclosure is as described follows. For convenience, the UE and the MAC entity at the UE refer to as a MAC entity.
[147]
The MAC entity receives logical channel configuration information regarding a logical channel (LCH). The logical channel configuration information comprises a logical channel identifier (LCH ID), a logical channel priority of the LCH, and a logical channel group identifier (LCG ID) of the LCG to which the LCH belong. Here, the logical channel can be any logical channel except for a Common Control Channel (CCCH).
[148]
The MAC entity receives information indicating a logical channel which is to be prioritized over a BSR, as follows:
[149]
1) A logical channel priority threshold (i.e., LCHP TH)
[150]
If a logical channel priority of a logical channel is equal to or higher than the LCHP TH, the MAC entity considers that logical channel is prioritized over a BSR.
[151]
2) A logical channel priority or a set of logical channel priorities
[152]
If a logical channel priority of a logical channel is equal to or one of the logical channel priority(s) included in the information, the MAC entity considers that logical channel is prioritized over a BSR.
[153]
3) An LCH ID or a set of LCH IDs
[154]
If a LCH ID of a logical channel is equal to or one of the LCH ID(s) included in the information, the MAC entity considers that logical channel is prioritized over a BSR.
[155]
4) An LCG ID or a set of LCG IDs
[156]
If a logical channel belongs to an LCG having an LCG ID equal to or one of the LCG ID(s) included in the information, the MAC entity considers that logical channel is prioritized over a BSR.
[157]
The information above 1)-4) can be signaled via L1/2/3 signaling. The MAC entity has pending data for multiple logical channels and pending BSRs.
[158]
The UE may receive an UL grant dynamically on a physical downlink control channel (PDCCH) or in a random access response, or may be configured a n UL grant semi-persistently by receiving RRC signalling from the network .For example, the MAC entity receives an UL grant from the network for a new transmission in uplink. The MAC entity still has pending BSRs when the MAC entity receives the UL grant. Further, the MAC entity may receive the UL grant in response to a scheduling request (SR) and a random access preamble.
[159]
The MAC entity generates a MAC PDU to be transmitted on an UL resource according to the received UL grant, and during this procedure, the MAC entity may determine whether to cancel or not all pending BSR(s) as follows.
[160]
Firstly, the MAC entity checks if the UL grant can accommodate all pending data for a concerned logical channel(s) but is not sufficient to additionally accommodate the BSR MAC CE plus its MAC subheader, where the concerned logical channel(s) is determined as above based on the received information.
[161]
Then, the MAC entity determines that the UL grant can accommodate all pending data for a concerned logical channel(s) but is not sufficient to additionally the BSR MAC CE plus its MAC subheader if following conditions (1) and (2) are all satisfied.
[162]
(1) the amount of the UL resource according to the received UL grant is equal to or larger than the size of all pending data for the concerned logical channel(s) plus corresponding MAC subheader(s).
[163]
(2) the amount of the UL resource according to the received UL grant is smaller than the size of all pending data for the concerned logical channels(s) and BSR MAC CE plus corresponding MAC subheaders.
[164]
Next, if the UL grant can accommodate all pending data for a concerned logical channel(s) but is not sufficient to additionally the BSR MAC CE plus its MAC subheader, the MAC entity cancels all pending BSR(s). Especially, the MAC entity cancels all pending BSR(s) even if there are still remaining data for logical channels other than the concerned logical channel(s). Alternatively, the MAC entity cancels all pending BSR(s) even if the MAC entity transmits a MAC PDU not including a BSR MAC Control Element (CE) which contains buffer status up to (and including) the last event that triggered a BSR prior to the MAC PDU assembly.
[165]
Further, if the UL grant cannot accommodate all pending data for the concerned logical channel(s), the MAC entity does not cancel all pending BSR(s). Especially, even though the MAC entity does not cancel in this stage, the MAC entity cancels all pending BSR(s) if the MAC entity transmits a MAC PDU including a BSR MAC CE which contains buffer status up to (and including) the last event that triggered a BSR prior to the MAC PDU assembly.
[166]
Furthermore, if the UL grant can accommodate all pending data for the concerned logical channel(s) and the BSR MAC CE plus its MAC subheader, the MAC entity does not cancel all pending BSR(s). Finally, if the UL grant can accommodate all pending data for all logical channels and the BSR MAC CE plus its MAC subheader, the MAC entity cancels all pending BSR(s).
[167]
After performing BSR cancellation according to the condition above, the MAC entity generates a MAC PDU by performing a Logical Channel Prioritization procedure.
[168]
If BSR is not pending (i.e., if the MAC entity cancels all pending BSR(s)), the MAC entity includes pending data according to the LCP procedure. More specifically, if the MAC PDU cannot include all pending data for a logical channel, the MAC entity may indicate that there is remaining data for the logical channel by using e.g., one bit in the corresponding MAC subheader, or indicate that there is remaining data for the MAC entity by using e.g., one bit in a MAC subheader among the MAC subheaders included in the MAC PDU.
[169]
While, if BSR is pending (i.e., if the MAC entity does not cancel pending BSR(s)), the MAC entity prioritizes the BSR MAC CE over all pending data for any logical channels or prioritize all pending data for the concerned logical channels over the BSR MAC CE but prioritize the BSR MAC CE over all pending data for other logical channels except for the concerned logical channels in LCP procedure. Especially, the MAC entity may not be able to include the BSR MAC CE if all pending data for the concerned logical channels consume all UL resources. Then, the UE may trigger a padding BSR according to the prior art in BSR procedure and report the padding BSR.
[170]
The MAC entity transmits the generated MAC PDU to the network by using the UL resource according to the received UL grant.
[171]
FIG. 9 shows a behavior of UE according to the BSR cancellation of the present disclosure. As mentioned above the UE refer to as a MAC entity.
[172]
Referring to FIG. 9, in S1001, the MAC entity is configured with a logical channel, which can be prioritized over a BSR (S1001), among the multiple logical channels. The MAC entity has pending data for multiple logical channel and pending BSRs in S1002, and may receive an UL grant in S1003.
[173]
Then, in S1004, the MAC entity determines if the UL grant can accommodate all pending data for the logical channel(s), which can be prioritized over the BSR, but is not sufficient to additionally accommodate the BSR MAC CE plus its MAC subheader. Further, the MAC entity determines whether the BSR cancellation condition is satisfied or not, in S1005.
[174]
If the BSR cancellation condition is satisfied, the MAC entity cancels all pending BSRs in S1006. While, if the BSR cancellation condition is not satisfied, the MAC entity does not cancel any pending BSR in S1007.
[175]
Especially, in FIG. 9, the order of S1002 and S1003 may be changed from each other, or S1003 may be omitted if the MAC entity already has a UL grant available.
[176]
A behavior of the network according to the BSR cancellation of the present disclosure is as follows.
[177]
The network configures multiple logical channels to the MAC entity of the UE. The network configured the multiple logical channels by signaling information on the logical channel(s) to the UE.
[178]
The network provides information indicating a concerned logical channel which is to be prioritized over a BSR among the configured multiple logical channels such as:
[179]
a) A logical channel priority threshold (LCHP TH)
[180]
It means that, if a logical channel priority of a logical channel is equal to or higher than the LCHP TH, that logical channel is prioritized over a BSR.
[181]
b) A logical channel priority or a set of logical channel priorities
[182]
It means that, if a logical channel priority of a logical channel is equal to or one of the logical channel priority(s) included in the information, that logical channel is prioritized over a BSR.
[183]
c) An LCH ID or a set of LCH IDs
[184]
It means that, if a LCH ID of a logical channel is equal to or one of the LCH ID(s) included in the information, that logical channel is prioritized over a BSR.
[185]
d) An LCG ID or a set of LCG IDs
[186]
It means that, if a logical channel belongs to an LCG having an LCG ID equal to or one of the LCG ID(s) included in the information, that logical channel is prioritized over a BSR.
[187]
The information above can be signalled via L1, L2 or L3 signalling.
[188]
The network may transmit an UL grant dynamically on a physical downlink control channel (PDCCH) or in a random access response to the UE, or configure UL grant semi-persistently to the UE by RRC signalling. For example, the network sends an UL grant for a new transmission in uplink to the MAC entity. Further, the network may send the UL grant in response to the SR or random access preamble transmitted by the MAC entity.
[189]
The network receives a MAC PDU transmitted on the UL resource according to the UL grant. Especially, the MAC PDU includes data from the concerned logical channels but not the BSR MAC CE. Even if the network receives the MAC PDU not including a BSR MAC CE, the network may further provides an UL grant to the MAC entity by assuming that the MAC entity cancels the BSR in order to transmit data from the concerned logical channel(s).
[190]
FIG. 10 shows an UL resource allocation procedure according to the present disclosure.
[191]
Referring to FIG. 10, the network configures multiple logical channels and transmits information indicating a concerned logical channel which is to be prioritized over a BSR, in S2001. Then, the network transmits an UL grant in S2002 and receives a MAC PDU according to the UL grant in S2003. Next, the network checks if the MC PDU includes data from the concerned logical channel but not the BSR MAC CE in S2004.
[192]
If the MAC PDU includes data from the concerned logical channel but not the BSR MAC CE, the network may transmit an UL grant by assuming that the MAC entity may cancel all pending BSRs for transmission of data from the concerned logical channels in S2005.
[193]
While, if the MAC PDU includes data from the concerned logical channel and also the BSR MAC CE, the network may not transmit an UL grant for LCHs other than the concerned LCH by assuming that the MAC entity transmit all pending data from the concerned LCH but cancels all pending BSRs even though there are remaining pending data from other LCHs, in S2006. Further, if the MAC PDU includes data from the concerned logical channel and also the BSR MAC CE, the network may transmit an UL grant for LCHs including the concerned LCH based on the received BSR MAC CE in S2006.
[194]
The disclosure can be applied to other MAC control information as well as BSR.
[195]
FIG. 11 shows a MAC PDU generation procedure according to the present disclosure.
[196]
Referring to FIG. 11, the MAC entity may receive information on a logical channel (LCH) to be prioritized over MAC control information, S3001.
[197]
Then, the MAC entity may determine whether to cancel MAC control information based on a UL grant available at the MAC entity and the information on the LCH to be prioritized over the MAC control information, in S3002.
[198]
Finally, the MAC entity may generate a MAC PDU including the MAC control information or not including the MAC control information based on the determination whether to cancel the MAC control information, in S3003.
[199]
For example, the disclosure above can be applied to the case where the MAC entity has pending data for multiple logical channels and pending MAC Control Information which has higher priority than data from any logical channel in Logical Channel Prioritization procedure. More specifically, MAC Control Information includes a PHR, a Configured Grant (CG) Confirmation, a BSR, etc. Further, the disclosure above can be applied to the case where the MAC entity has pending data for multiple logical channels and pending PHRs, or the MAC entity has pending data for multiple logical channels and pending BSRs and pending PHRs.
[200]
In applying the disclosure to the case above (i.e., the MAC entity has pending MAC Control Information such as BSR, PHR and/or CG confirmation), the MAC entity receives information indicating a logical channel which is to be prioritized over a MAC Control Information, and determines whether to cancel or not all pending MAC Control Information as follows.
[201]
Firstly, the MAC entity compares the amount of the UL resource according to the received UL grant to the size of all pending data for the concerned logical channel(s) plus corresponding MAC subheader(s) and the size of all pending data for the concerned logical channels(s) and MAC Control Information plus corresponding MAC subheaders.
[202]
Next, the MAC entity considers that the UL grant can accommodate all pending data for a concerned logical channel(s) but is not sufficient to additionally the BSR MAC CE plus its MAC subheader. If the amount of the UL resource according to the received UL grant is equal to or larger than the size of all pending data for the concerned logical channel(s) plus corresponding MAC subheader(s), and smaller than the size of all pending data for the concerned logical channels(s) and MAC Control Information plus corresponding MAC subheaders.
[203]
Finally, the MAC entity cancels all pending MAC Control Information(s) if the MAC entity determines that the UL grant can accommodate all pending data for a concerned logical channel(s) but is not sufficient to additionally the BSR MAC CE plus its MAC subheader.
[204]
FIG. 12 shows an example to which the present disclosure is applied.
[205]
Referring to FIG. 12, the MAC entity is configured with two logical channels LCH1 in LCG1 and LCH2 in LCG2 at S4001, and is configured that LCH1 can be prioritized over BSR at S4001.
[206]
At S4002, the MAC entity identifies that the amount of pending data is 5 bytes (including header) and 3 bytes for LCH1 and LCH2, respectively. Further, the MAC entity has pending BSR at S4002, where the size of BSR MAC CE is 4 bytes (including 2 bytes header, 1 byte LCG field, 2 bytes BS fields).
[207]
The MAC entity receives an UL grant for new transmission, which allocates X bytes of UL resource at S4003. Then, the MAC entity checks if BSR cancellation condition is met or not at S4004. The BSR cancellation is assumed that X is greater than or equal to 5 bytes (i.e., all pending LCH1 data) and X is smaller than 5 + 4 bytes (i.e., all pending LCH1 data + BSR MAC CE).
[208]
If the BSR cancellation condition is met, the MAC entity cancels all pending BSR at S4005. While, the BSR cancellation condition is not met, the MAC entity does not cancel pending BSR at S4005. Then, at S4006, the MAC entity generates a MAC PDU according to the result in S4005. Finally, the MAC entity transmits the generated MAC PDU to the network by using UL resource according the UL grant, at S4007.
[209]
In FIG. 12, the order of S4002 and S4003 may be changed from each other, or S4003 may be omitted if the MAC entity already has a UL grant available. Further, for S4003-S4005, the disclosure is presented in detail depending on X bytes of UL resource. For simplicity, PBR execution is omitted in the MAC PDU generation.
[210]
Case1. The MAC entity receives an UL grant allocating 5 bytes of UL resource.
[211]
The 5 bytes of UL resource can accommodate all 5 bytes of LCH1 data but cannot accommodate additionally 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE. Therefore, the MAC entity cancels pending BSR. The MAC PDU includes 5 bytes of LCH1 data only.
[212]
In convention art, the MAC entity does not cancel pending BSR. The MAC PDU includes 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE and padding bits.
[213]
Case2. The MAC entity receives an UL grant allocating 7 bytes of UL resource.
[214]
The 7 bytes of UL resource can accommodate all 5 bytes of LCH1 data but cannot accommodate additionally 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE. Therefore, the MAC entity cancels pending BSR. The MAC PDU includes 5 bytes of LCH1 data and 2 bytes of LCH2 data.
[215]
In convention art, the MAC entity does not cancel pending BSR. The MAC PDU includes 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE and 3 bytes of LCH1 data.
[216]
Case3. The MAC entity receives an UL grant allocating 9 bytes of UL resource.
[217]
The 9 bytes of UL resource can accommodate all 5 bytes of LCH1 data and additionally 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE. Therefore, the MAC entity does not cancel pending BSR. The MAC PDU includes 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE and 5 bytes of LCH1 data.
[218]
In convention art, the MAC entity does not cancel pending BSR. The MAC PDU includes 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE and 5 bytes of LCH1 data. The MAC PDU generation results in the same form of the MAC PDU in both of disclosure and convention.
[219]
Case4. The MAC entity receives an UL grant allocating 11 bytes of UL resource.
[220]
The 11 bytes of UL resource can accommodate all 5 bytes of LCH1 data and additionally 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE. Therefore, the MAC entity does not cancel pending BSR. However, the MAC PDU can accommodate all 5 bytes and 3 bytes of LCH1 and LCH2 data without BSR MAC CE. Therefore, the MAC entity cancels pending BSR later (as in the prior art). Therefore, the MAC PDU includes 5 bytes of LCH1 data, 3 bytes of LCH2 data, and 3 bytes of padding BSR.
[221]
In convention art, the MAC entity cancels pending BSR because the MAC PDU can accommodate all 5 bytes and 3 bytes of LCH1 and LCH2 data without BSR MAC CE. The MAC PDU includes 5 bytes of LCH1 data, 3 bytes of LCH2 data, and 3 bytes of padding BSR. The MAC PDU generation results in the same form of the MAC PDU in both of disclosure and convention.
[222]
Case5. The MAC entity receives an UL grant allocating 12 bytes of UL resource.
[223]
The 12 bytes of UL resource can accommodate all 5 bytes of LCH1 data and additionally 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE. Therefore, the MAC entity does not cancel pending BSR. The MAC PDU includes 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE, 5 bytes of LCH1 data, and 3 bytes of LCH2 data.
[224]
In convention art, the MAC entity does not cancel pending BSR. The MAC PDU includes 4 bytes of BSR MAC CE, 5 bytes of LCH1 data, and 3 bytes of LCH2 data. The MAC PDU generation results in the same form of the MAC PDU in both of disclosure and convention.
[225]
In summary, if there is a scheduling assistant information to be sent (e.g., BSR or PHR), URLLC traffic could be delayed according to the prior art in BSR/PHR/LCP operation. It would have negative impact on URLLC data transmission because URLLC data transmission is delay sensitive. To resolve this issue, the network may need to provide sufficient UL grant to the UE so that there is always sufficient space to accommodate all pending data. In practice, however, it would not be possible due to the limited resource and unawareness of exact amount of pending data before receiving a BSR from the network perspective.
[226]
According to the provided disclosure, the UE shall cancel BSR/PHR if pending URLLC traffic can be included in the MAC PDU although there are still remaining non-URLLC traffic. If the BSR/PHR is cancelled for pending URLLC traffic, the BSR MAC CE and/or the PHR MAC CE is not considered in the LCP procedure and thus the probability that the logical channel associated with the pending URLLC traffic prioritizes in the LCP procedure increases.
[227]
Therefore, URLLC traffic can be sent without waiting for another time duration of BSR transmission, UL grant reception, and PUSCH transmission. Considering UE and network processing time, the time duration for BSR transmission, UL grant reception, and PUSCH transmission might not be small, which is critical for URLLC traffic communication. Therefore, reducing this time duration would be highly valued for URLLC communication.
[228]
FIG. 13 is a block diagram illustrating an example of elements of a transmitting device 100 and a receiving device 200 according to some implementations of the present disclosure.
[229]
The transmitting device 100 and the receiving device 200 respectively include transceivers 13 and 23 capable of transmitting and receiving radio signals carrying information, data, signals, and/or messages, memories 12 and 22 for storing information related to communication in a wireless communication system, and processors 11 and 21 operationally connected to elements such as the transceivers 13 and 23 and the memories 12 and 22 to control the elements and configured to control the memories 12 and 22 and/or the transceivers 13 and 23 so that a corresponding device may perform at least one of the above-described implementations of the present disclosure.
[230]
The memories 12 and 22 may store programs for processing and controlling the processors 11 and 21 and may temporarily store input/output information. The memories 12 and 22 may be used as buffers. The buffers at each protocol layer (e.g. PDCP, RLC, MAC) are parts of the memories 12 and 22.
[231]
The processors 11 and 21 generally control the overall operation of various modules in the transmitting device and the receiving device. Especially, the processors 11 and 21 may perform various control functions to implement the present disclosure. For example, the operations occurring at the protocol stacks (e.g. PDCP, RLC, MAC and PHY layers) according to the present disclosure may be performed by the processors 11 and 21. The protocol stacks performing operations of the present disclosure may be parts of the processors 11 and 21.
[232]
The processors 11 and 21 may be referred to as controllers, microcontrollers, microprocessors, or microcomputers. The processors 11 and 21 may be implemented by hardware, firmware, software, or a combination thereof. In a hardware configuration, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), digital signal processors (DSPs), digital signal processing devices (DSPDs), programmable logic devices (PLDs), or field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) may be included in the processors 11 and 21. The present disclosure may be implemented using firmware or software, and the firmware or software may be configured to include modules, procedures, functions, etc. performing the functions or operations of the present disclosure. Firmware or software configured to perform the present disclosure may be included in the processors 11 and 21 or stored in the memories 12 and 22 so as to be driven by the processors 11 and 21.
[233]
The processor 11 of the transmitting device 100 performs predetermined coding and modulation for a signal and/or data scheduled to be transmitted to the outside by the processor 11 or a scheduler connected with the processor 11, and then transfers the coded and modulated data to the transceiver 13. For example, the processor 11 converts a data stream to be transmitted into K layers through demultiplexing, channel coding, scrambling, and modulation. The coded data stream is also referred to as a codeword and is equivalent to a transport block which is a data block provided by a MAC layer. One transport block (TB) is coded into one codeword and each codeword is transmitted to the receiving device in the form of one or more layers. For frequency up-conversion, the transceiver 13 may include an oscillator. The transceiver 13 may include Nt (where Nt is a positive integer) transmission antennas.
[234]
A signal processing process of the receiving device 200 is the reverse of the signal processing process of the transmitting device 100. Under control of the processor 21, the transceiver 23 of the receiving device 200 receives radio signals transmitted by the transmitting device 100. The transceiver 23 may include Nr (where Nr is a positive integer) receive antennas and frequency down-converts each signal received through receive antennas into a baseband signal. The processor 21 decodes and demodulates the radio signals received through the reception antennas and restores data that the transmitting device 100 intended to transmit.
[235]
The transceivers 13 and 23 include one or more antennas. An antenna performs a function for transmitting signals processed by the transceivers 13 and 23 to the exterior or receiving radio signals from the exterior to transfer the radio signals to the transceivers 13 and 23. The antenna may also be called an antenna port. Each antenna may correspond to one physical antenna or may be configured by a combination of more than one physical antenna element. The signal transmitted from each antenna cannot be further deconstructed by the receiving device 200. An RS transmitted through a corresponding antenna defines an antenna from the view point of the receiving device 200 and enables the receiving device 200 to derive channel estimation for the antenna, irrespective of whether the channel represents a single radio channel from one physical antenna or a composite channel from a plurality of physical antenna elements including the antenna. That is, an antenna is defined such that a channel carrying a symbol of the antenna can be obtained from a channel carrying another symbol of the same antenna. An transceiver supporting a MIMO function of transmitting and receiving data using a plurality of antennas may be connected to two or more antennas. The transceivers 13 and 23 may be referred to as radio frequency (RF) units.
[236]
In the implementations of the present disclosure, a UE operates as the transmitting device 100 in UL and as the receiving device 200 in DL. In the implementations of the present disclosure, a BS operates as the receiving device 200 in UL and as the transmitting device 100 in DL. Hereinafter, a processor, a transceiver, and a memory included in the UE will be referred to as a UE processor, a UE transceiver, and a UE memory, respectively, and a processor, a transceiver, and a memory included in the BS will be referred to as a BS processor, a BS transceiver, and a BS memory, respectively.
[237]
The UE processor can be configured to operate according to the present disclosure, or control the UE transceiver to receive or transmit signals according to the present disclosure. The BS processor can be configured to operate according to the present disclosure, or control the BS transceiver to receive or transmit signals according to the present disclosure.
[238]
The processor 11 (at a UE and/or at a BS) checks whether there is a UL grant or DL assignment for a serving cell in a time unit. If there is a UL grant or DL assignment for the serving cell in the time unit, the processor 11 checks whether a data unit is actually present on the UL grant or DL assignment in the time unit, in order to determine whether to restart a deactivation timer associated with the serving cell which has been started. The processor 11 restarts the deactivation timer associated with the serving cell in the time unit if there is a data unit present on the UL grant or DL assignment in the time unit. The processor 11 does not restart the deactivation timer associated with the serving cell in the time unit if there is no data unit present on the UL grant or DL assignment in the time unit, unless another condition that the processor 11 should restart the deactivation timer is satisfied. The processor 11 does not restart the deactivation timer associated with the serving cell in the time unit if there is no data unit present on the UL grant or DL assignment in the time unit and if an activation command for activating the serving cell is not present in the time unit. The processor 11 may be configured to check whether a data unit is actually present on the UL grant or DL assignment on the serving cell in the time unit in order to determine whether to restart the deactivation timer of the serving cell, if the UL grant or DL assignment is a configured grant/assignment which is configured by RRC to occur periodically on the serving cell. The processor 11 may be configured to check whether a data unit is actually present on the UL grant or DL assignment on the serving cell in the time unit in order to determine whether to restart the deactivation timer of the serving cell, if the UL grant or the DL assignment is a dynamic grant/assignment which is indicated by a PDCCH. The processor 11 may be configured to check whether a data unit is actually present on the UL grant or DL assignment on the serving cell in the time unit in order to determine whether to restart the deactivation timer of the serving cell, if the serving cell is a SCell of the UE. The processor 11 (at the UE and/or the BS) deactivates the serving cell upon expiry of the deactivation timer associated with the serving cell.
[239]
The above-described embodiments correspond to combinations of elements and features of the present disclosure in prescribed forms. And, the respective elements or features may be considered as selective unless they are explicitly mentioned. Each of the elements or features can be implemented in a form failing to be combined with other elements or features. Moreover, it is able to implement an embodiment of the present disclosure by combining elements and/or features together in part. A sequence of operations explained for each embodiment of the present disclosure can be modified. Some configurations or features of one embodiment can be included in another embodiment or can be substituted for corresponding configurations or features of another embodiment. And, it is apparently understandable that an embodiment is configured by combining claims failing to have relation of explicit citation in the appended claims together or can be included as new claims by amendment after filing an application.
[240]
Embodiments of the present disclosure can be implemented using various means. For instance, embodiments of the present disclosure can be implemented using hardware, firmware, software and/or any combinations thereof. In the implementation by hardware, a method according to each embodiment of the present disclosure can be implemented by at least one selected from the group consisting of ASICs (application specific integrated circuits), DSPs (digital signal processors), DSPDs (digital signal processing devices), PLDs (programmable logic devices), FPGAs (field programmable gate arrays), processor, controller, microcontroller, microprocessor and the like.
[241]
In case of the implementation by firmware or software, a method according to each embodiment of the present disclosure can be implemented by modules, procedures, and/or functions for performing the above-explained functions or operations. Software code is stored in a memory unit and is then drivable by a processor. The memory unit is provided within or outside the processor to exchange data with the processor through the various means known in public.
[242]
While the present disclosure has been described and illustrated herein with reference to the preferred embodiments thereof, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and variations can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the disclosure. Thus, it is intended that the present disclosure covers the modifications and variations of this disclosure that come within the scope of the appended claims and their equivalents.

Industrial Applicability

[243]
The implementations of the present disclosure are applicable to a network node (e.g., BS), a UE, or other devices in a wireless communication system.

Claims

[Claim 1]
A method for transmitting a protocol data unit (PDU) by a user equipment (UE) in a wireless communication system, the method comprising: receiving an uplink (UL) grant from a network; when the UL grant can accommodate all of pending data for a first logical channel but is not sufficient to additionally accommodate a buffer status report (BSR), including the pending data for the first logical channel to the PDU with canceling the BSR; and transmitting the PDU to the network, wherein the UL grant cannot additionally accommodate all of pending data for a second logical channel.
[Claim 2]
The method of claim 1, wherein the PDU includes a part of the pending data for the second logical channel
[Claim 3]
The method of claim 1, further comprising: transmitting, to the network, an indicator indicating that there is remaining data for the second logical channel.
[Claim 4]
The method of claim 1, further comprising receiving information related to the first logical channel, wherein the information includes at least one of an identifier of the first logical channel and an identifier of a logical channel group to which the first logical channel belongs.
[Claim 5]
A user equipment (UE) in a wireless communication system, the user equipment comprising: a memory; and at least one processor coupled to the memory and configured to: receive an uplink (UL) grant from a network; when the UL grant can accommodate all of pending data for a first logical channel but is not sufficient to additionally accommodate a buffer status report (BSR), include the pending data for the first logical channel to a protocol data unit (PDU) with canceling the BSR; and transmit the PDU to the network, wherein the UL grant cannot additionally accommodate all of pending data for a second logical channel.
[Claim 6]
The UE of claim 5, wherein the PDU includes a part of the pending data for the second logical channel
[Claim 7]
The UE of claim 5, wherein the at least one processor is further configured to transmit, to the network, an indicator indicating that there is remaining data for the second logical channel.
[Claim 8]
The UE of claim 5, wherein the at least one processor is further configured to receive information related to the first logical channel, Wherein the information includes at least one of an identifier of the first logical channel and an identifier of a logical channel group to which the first logical channel belongs.
[Claim 9]
The UE of claim 5, wherein the at least one processor is further configured to implement at least one advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) function based on signals that control the UE.

Drawings

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