Some content of this application is unavailable at the moment.
If this situation persist, please contact us atFeedback&Contact
1. (WO2019003036) SURGICAL ANVIL ARRANGEMENTS
Note: Text based on automatic Optical Character Recognition processes. Please use the PDF version for legal matters

TITLE

SURGICAL ANVIL ARRANGEMENTS

BACKGROUND

[0001] The present invention relates to surgical instruments and, in various arrangements, to surgical stapling and cutting instruments and staple cartridges for use therewith that are designed to staple and cut tissue.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0002] Various features of the embodiments described herein, together with advantages thereof, may be understood in accordance with the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings as follows:

[0003] FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a surgical system comprising a handle assembly and multiple interchangeable surgical tool assemblies that may be used therewith;

[0004] FIG. 2 is a perspective view of one of the interchangeable surgical tool assemblies of FIG. 1 operably coupled to the handle assembly of FIG. 1 ;

[0005] FIG. 3 is an exploded assembly view of portions of the handle assembly and interchangeable surgical tool assembly of FIGS. 1 and 2;

[0006] FIG. 4 is a perspective view of another one of the interchangeable surgical tool assemblies depicted in FIG. 1 ;

[0007] FIG. 5 is a partial cross-sectional perspective view of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly of FIG. 4;

[0008] FIG. 6 is another partial cross-sectional view of a portion of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly of FIGS. 4 and 5;

[0009] FIG. 7 is an exploded assembly view of a portion of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly of FIGS. 4-6;

[0010] FIG. 7A is an enlarged top view of a portion of an elastic spine assembly of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly of FIG. 7;

[0011] FIG. 8 is an exploded assembly view of a portion of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly of FIGS. 4-7;

[0012] FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional perspective view of a surgical end effector portion of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly of FIGS. 4-8;

[0013] FIG. 10 is an exploded assembly view of the surgical end effector portion of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly depicted in FIG. 9;

[0014] FIG. 1 1 is a perspective view, a side elevational view and a front elevational view of a firing member that may be employed in the interchangeable surgical tool assembly of FIGS. 4-10;

[0015] FIG. 12 is a perspective view of an anvil that may be employed in the interchangeable surgical tool assembly of FIGS. 4-1 1 ;

[0016] FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional side elevational view of the anvil of FIG. 12;

[0017] FIG. 14 is a bottom view of the anvil of FIGS. 12 and 13;

[0018] FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional side elevational view of a portion of a surgical end effector and shaft portion of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly of FIG. 4 with an unspent surgical staple cartridge properly seated within an elongate channel of the surgical end effector;

[0019] FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional side elevational view of the surgical end effector and shaft portion of FIG. 15 after the surgical staple cartridge has been fired during a staple firing stroke and a firing member being retracted to a starting position after the staple firing stroke;

[0020] FIG. 17 is another cross-sectional side elevational view of the surgical end effector and shaft portion of FIG. 16 after the firing member has been fully retracted back to its starting position;

[0021] FIG. 18 is a top cross-sectional view of the surgical end effector and shaft portion depicted in FIG. 15 with the unspent surgical staple cartridge properly seated with the elongate channel of the surgical end effector;

[0022] FIG. 19 is another top cross-sectional view of the surgical end effector of FIG. 15 with a fired surgical staple cartridge mounted therein illustrating the firing member retained in a locked position;

[0023] FIG. 20 is a partial cross-sectional view of portions of the anvil and elongate channel of the interchangeable tool assembly of FIG. 4;

[0024] FIG. 21 is an exploded side elevational view of portions of the anvil and elongate channel of FIG. 20;

[0025] FIG. 22 is a rear perspective view of an anvil mounting portion of an anvil in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0026] FIG. 23 is a rear perspective view of an anvil mounting portion of another anvil in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0027] FIG. 24 is a rear perspective view of an anvil mounting portion of another anvil in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0028] FIG. 25 is a perspective view of an anvil in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0029] FIG. 26 is an exploded perspective view of the anvil of FIG. 25;

[0030] FIG. 27 is a cross-sectional end view of the anvil of FIG. 25;

[0031] FIG. 28 is a perspective view of another anvil in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0032] FIG. 29 is an exploded perspective view of the anvil embodiment of FIG. 28;

[0033] FIG. 30 is a top view of a distal end portion of an anvil body portion of the anvil of FIG.

28;

[0034] FIG. 31 is a top view of a distal end portion of an anvil body portion of another anvil in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0035] FIG. 32 is a cross-sectional end perspective view of the anvil of FIG. 31 ;

[0036] FIG. 33 is a cross-sectional end perspective view of another anvil in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0037] FIG. 34 provides a comparison between a first embodiment of an anvil and a second embodiment of an anvil;

[0038] FIG. 35 is a cross-sectional view of an end effector comprising the second anvil embodiment of FIG. 34;

[0039] FIG. 36 is a partial cross-sectional view of the first anvil embodiment of FIG. 34 and a firing member configured to engage the first anvil embodiment;

[0040] FIG. 37 is a partial elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 36;

[0041] FIG. 38 is an illustration depicting stress concentrations in the first anvil embodiment of

FIG. 34 and the firing member of FIG. 36;

[0042] FIG. 39 is an another illustration depicting stress concentrations in the firing member of

FIG. 36;

[0043] FIG. 40 is a perspective view of a firing member in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0044] FIG. 41 is a side elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 40;

[0045] FIG. 42 is a front elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 40;

[0046] FIG. 43 is a partial perspective view of a firing member in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0047] FIG. 44 is a partial side elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 43;

[0048] FIG. 45 is a partial front elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 43;

[0049] FIG. 46 is a partial perspective view of a firing member in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0050] FIG. 47 is a partial side elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 46;

[0051] FIG. 48 is a partial front elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 46;

[0052] FIG. 49 is a partial perspective view of a firing member in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0053] FIG. 50 is a partial side elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 49;

[0054] FIG. 51 is a partial front elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 49;

[0055] FIG. 52 is a partial perspective view of a firing member in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0056] FIG. 53 is a partial side elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 52;

[0057] FIG. 54 is a partial front elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 52;

[0058] FIG. 55 is a partial perspective view of a firing member in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0059] FIG. 56 is a partial side elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 55;

[0060] FIG. 57 is a partial front elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 55;

[0061] FIG. 58 is a partial perspective view of a firing member in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0062] FIG. 59 is a partial side elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 58;

[0063] FIG. 60 is a partial front elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 58;

[0064] FIG. 61 is a partial perspective view of a firing member in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0065] FIG. 62 is a partial side elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 61 ;

[0066] FIG. 63 is a partial front elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 61 ;

[0067] FIG. 64 is a partial perspective view of a firing member in accordance with at least one embodiment;

[0068] FIG. 65 is a partial side elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 64;

[0069] FIG. 66 is another partial perspective view of the firing member of FIG. 64;

[0070] FIG. 67 is a partial front elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 64;

[0071] FIG. 68 is a schematic depicting the energy needed to advance firing members disclosed herein through staple firing strokes;

[0072] FIG. 69 is a detail view of a lateral projection extending from the firing member of FIG. 43 schematically illustrating the interaction between the lateral projection and an anvil in a flexed condition;

[0073] FIG. 70 is a detail view of a lateral projection extending from the firing member of FIG. 58 schematically illustrating the interaction between the lateral projection and an anvil in a flexed condition;

[0074] FIG. 71 is a detail view of a lateral projection extending from the firing member of FIG. 58 schematically illustrating the interaction between the lateral projection and an anvil another flexed condition;

[0075] FIG. 72 is a perspective view of an anvil of a surgical stapling instrument comprising an anvil body and an anvil cap;

[0076] FIG. 73 is an exploded view of the anvil of FIG. 72;

[0077] FIG. 74 is a partial, cross-sectional view of a welded, anvil comprising vertical welding surfaces;

[0078] FIG. 75 is a partial, cross-sectional view of a welded, anvil comprising horizontal welding surfaces;

[0079] FIG. 76 is a partial, cross-sectional view of a welded, anvil comprising angular welding surfaces;

[0080] FIG. 77 is a cross-sectional view an anvil comprising an anvil body and an anvil cap, wherein the anvil body and the anvil cap are welded to each other;

[0081] FIG. 78 is a micrograph of a surgical stapling anvil comprising a first anvil member and a second anvil member, wherein the first anvil member and the second anvil member are welded to each other;

[0082] FIG. 79 is a cross-sectional view of a surgical stapling anvil comprising an anvil body and an anvil cap;

[0083] FIG. 80 is a chart representing four different surgical stapling anvil arrangements subject to two different load scenarios comprising deflection and stress data for a first scenario and stress data for a second scenario;

[0084] FIG. 81 is a perspective view of an anvil comprising a first anvil member and a second anvil member, wherein the anvil members comprise a weld configuration configured to increase overall weld depth;

[0085] FIG. 82 is a cross-sectional view of the surgical stapling anvil of FIG. 81 prior to welding taken along line 82-82 in FIG. 81 ;

[0086] FIG. 83 is a cross-sectional view of the surgical stapling anvil of FIG. 81 after welding taken along line 83-83 in FIG. 81 ;

[0087] FIG. 84 is a cross-sectional view of a surgical stapling anvil comprising a first anvil member and a second anvil member welded to each other;

[0088] FIG. 85 is a partial cross-sectional, partially exploded view of the surgical stapling anvil of FIG. 84;

[0089] FIG. 86 is a cross-sectional view of a surgical stapling anvil comprising a first anvil member and a second anvil member welded to each other, wherein the anvil members comprise interlocking features;

[0090] FIG. 87 is a cross-sectional view of a surgical stapling anvil comprising a first anvil member and a second anvil member welded to each other, wherein the anvil members comprise interlocking features;

[0091] FIG. 88 is a perspective view of an end effector assembly illustrated in an open configuration;

[0092] FIG. 89 is a perspective view of the end effector assembly of FIG. 88 illustrated in a closed configuration;

[0093] FIG. 90 is a partial cross-sectional view of the end effector assembly of FIG. 88 taken along line 90-90 in FIG. 88;

[0094] FIG. 91 is a partial cross-sectional view of the end effector assembly of FIG. 88 taken along line 91 -91 in FIG. 89;

[0095] FIG. 92 is a cross-sectional view of the end effector assembly of FIG. 88 taken along line 92-92 in FIG. 89;

[0096] FIG. 93 is a perspective view of a staple cartridge channel comprising a channel body and a channel cap welded thereto;

[0097] FIG. 94 is an exploded view of the staple cartridge channel of FIG. 93;

[0098] FIG. 95 is a cross-sectional view of a staple cartridge channel comprising a first channel member and a second channel member welded to each other;

[0099] FIG. 96 is a perspective view of a firing member for use with a surgical instrument, wherein the firing member comprises a first jaw-coupling member and a second jaw-coupling member;

[0100] FIG. 97 is a perspective view of another firing member for use with a surgical instrument, wherein the firing member comprises a first jaw-coupling member and a second jaw-coupling member;

[0101] FIG. 98 is a front view of the firing member of FIG. 96;

[0102] FIG. 99 is an elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 96;

[0103] FIG. 100 is a front view of the firing member of FIG. 97;

[0104] FIG. 101 is an elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 97;

[0105] FIG. 102 is a partial elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 96;

[0106] FIG. 103 is a partial elevational view of the firing member of FIG. 97;

[0107] FIG. 104 is a cross-sectional view of a stapling system comprising the firing member of FIG. 97;

[0108] FIG. 105 is a cross-sectional view of a stapling system comprising the firing member of FIG. 96;

[0109] FIG. 106 is a partial cross-sectional view of an anvil and the firing member of the stapling system of FIG. 105;

[0110] FIG. 107 is a partial cross-sectional view of an anvil and the firing member of the stapling system of FIG. 104; and

[0111] FIG. 108 is a stress analysis of the anvil of the stapling system of FIG. 105.

[0112] Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views. The exemplifications set out herein illustrate various embodiments of the invention, in one form, and such exemplifications are not to be construed as limiting the scope of the invention in any manner.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0113] Applicant of the present application owns the following U.S. Patent Applications that were filed on even date herewith and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entireties:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. entitled SURGICAL ANVIL

MANUFACTURING METHODS; Attorney Docket No. END8165USNP/170079M;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. entitled SURGICAL ANVIL

ARRANGEMENTS; Attorney Docket No. END8168USNP/170080;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. entitled SURGICAL ANVIL

ARRANGEMENTS; Attorney Docket No. END8164USNP/170082;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. entitled SURGICAL FIRING MEMBER

ARRANGEMENTS; Attorney Docket No. END8169USNP/170083;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. entitled STAPLE FORMING POCKET

ARRANGEMENTS; Attorney Docket No. END8167USNP/170085;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. entitled STAPLE FORMING POCKET

ARRANGEMENTS; Attorney Docket No. END8232USNP/170086;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. entitled SURGICAL END EFFECTORS

AND ANVILS; Attorney Docket No. END8166USNP/170087; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. entitled ARTICULATION SYSTEMS

FOR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS; Attorney Docket No. END8171 USNP/170088.

[0114] Applicant of the present application owns the following U.S. Patent Applications that were filed on December 21 , 2016 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entireties:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,185, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

INSTRUMENTS AND REPLACEABLE TOOL ASSEMBLIES THEREOF;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,230, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,221 , entitled LOCKOUT ARRANGEMENTS FOR SURGICAL END EFFECTORS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,209, entitled SURGICAL END EFFECTORS AND FIRING MEMBERS THEREOF;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386, 198, entitled LOCKOUT ARRANGEMENTS FOR SURGICAL END EFFECTORS AND REPLACEABLE TOOL ASSEMBLIES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,240, entitled SURGICAL END EFFECTORS AND ADAPTABLE FIRING MEMBERS THEREFOR;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,939, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGES AND ARRANGEMENTS OF STAPLES AND STAPLE CAVITIES THEREIN;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,941 , entitled SURGICAL TOOL ASSEMBLIES WITH CLUTCHING ARRANGEMENTS FOR SHIFTING BETWEEN CLOSURE SYSTEMS WITH CLOSURE STROKE REDUCTION FEATURES AND ARTICULATION AND FIRING SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,943, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

INSTRUMENTS AND STAPLE-FORMING ANVILS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,950, entitled SURGICAL TOOL ASSEMBLIES WITH CLOSURE STROKE REDUCTION FEATURES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,945, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGES AND ARRANGEMENTS OF STAPLES AND STAPLE CAVITIES THEREIN;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,946, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

INSTRUMENTS AND STAPLE-FORMING ANVILS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,951 , entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH JAW OPENING FEATURES FOR INCREASING A JAW OPENING DISTANCE;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,953, entitled METHODS OF STAPLING TISSUE;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,954, entitled FIRING MEMBERS WITH NON-PARALLEL JAW ENGAGEMENT FEATURES FOR SURGICAL END EFFECTORS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,955, entitled SURGICAL END EFFECTORS WITH EXPANDABLE TISSUE STOP ARRANGEMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,948, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

INSTRUMENTS AND STAPLE-FORMING ANVILS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,956, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH POSITIVE JAW OPENING FEATURES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,958, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH LOCKOUT ARRANGEMENTS FOR PREVENTING FIRING SYSTEM ACTUATION UNLESS AN UNSPENT STAPLE CARTRIDGE IS PRESENT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,947, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGES AND ARRANGEMENTS OF STAPLES AND STAPLE CAVITIES THEREIN;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,896, entitled METHOD FOR RESETTING A FUSE OF A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT SHAFT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,898, entitled STAPLE FORMING POCKET ARRANGEMENT TO ACCOMMODATE DIFFERENT TYPES OF STAPLES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,899, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING IMPROVED JAW CONTROL;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,901 , entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE AND STAPLE CARTRIDGE CHANNEL COMPRISING WINDOWS DEFINED THEREIN;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,902, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING A CUTTING MEMBER;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,904, entitled STAPLE FIRING MEMBER COMPRISING A MISSING CARTRIDGE AND/OR SPENT CARTRIDGE LOCKOUT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,905, entitled FIRING ASSEMBLY

COMPRISING A LOCKOUT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,907, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT SYSTEM COMPRISING AN END EFFECTOR LOCKOUT AND A FIRING ASSEMBLY LOCKOUT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,908, entitled FIRING ASSEMBLY

COMPRISING A FUSE;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,909, entitled FIRING ASSEMBLY

COMPRISING A MULTIPLE FAILED-STATE FUSE;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,920, entitled STAPLE FORMING POCKET ARRANGEMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,913, entitled ANVIL ARRANGEMENTS FOR SURGICAL STAPLE/FASTENERS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,914, entitled METHOD OF DEFORMING STAPLES FROM TWO DIFFERENT TYPES OF STAPLE CARTRIDGES WITH THE SAME SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,893, entitled BILATERALLY ASYMMETRIC STAPLE FORMING POCKET PAIRS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,929, entitled CLOSURE MEMBERS WITH CAM SURFACE ARRANGEMENTS FOR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH SEPARATE AND DISTINCT CLOSURE AND FIRING SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385, 91 1 , entitled SURGICAL

STAPLE/FASTENERS WITH INDEPENDENTLY ACTUATABLE CLOSING AND FIRING SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,927, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

INSTRUMENTS WITH SMART STAPLE CARTRIDGES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,917, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE

COMPRISING STAPLES WITH DIFFERENT CLAMPING BREADTHS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,900, entitled STAPLE FORMING POCKET ARRANGEMENTS COMPRISING PRIMARY SIDEWALLS AND POCKET SIDEWALLS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,931 , entitled NO-CARTRIDGE AND SPENT CARTRIDGE LOCKOUT ARRANGEMENTS FOR SURGICAL STAPLE/FASTENERS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,915, entitled FIRING MEMBER PIN ANGLE;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,897, entitled STAPLE FORMING POCKET ARRANGEMENTS COMPRISING ZONED FORMING SURFACE GROOVES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,922, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT WITH MULTIPLE FAILURE RESPONSE MODES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,924, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT WITH PRIMARY AND SAFETY PROCESSORS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,912, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH JAWS THAT ARE PIVOTABLE ABOUT A FIXED AXIS AND INCLUDE SEPARATE AND DISTINCT CLOSURE AND FIRING SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,910, entitled ANVIL HAVING A KNIFE SLOT WIDTH;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,906, entitled FIRING MEMBER PIN

CONFIGURATIONS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,188, entitled STEPPED STAPLE CARTRIDGE WITH ASYMMETRICAL STAPLES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,192, entitled STEPPED STAPLE CARTRIDGE WITH TISSUE RETENTION AND GAP SETTING FEATURES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,206, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE WITH DEFORMABLE DRIVER RETENTION FEATURES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,226, entitled DURABILITY FEATURES FOR END EFFECTORS AND FIRING ASSEMBLIES OF SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,222, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

INSTRUMENTS HAVING END EFFECTORS WITH POSITIVE OPENING FEATURES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/386,236, entitled CONNECTION PORTIONS FOR DEPOSABLE LOADING UNITS FOR SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,887, entitled METHOD FOR ATTACHING A SHAFT ASSEMBLY TO A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT AND, ALTERNATIVELY, TO A

SURGICAL ROBOT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,889, entitled SHAFT ASSEMBLY

COMPRISING A MANUALLY-OPERABLE RETRACTION SYSTEM FOR USE WITH A

MOTORIZED SURGICAL INSTRUMENT SYSTEM;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,890, entitled SHAFT ASSEMBLY

COMPRISING SEPARATELY ACTUATABLE AND RETRACTABLE SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,891 , entitled SHAFT ASSEMBLY

COMPRISING A CLUTCH CONFIGURED TO ADAPT THE OUTPUT OF A ROTARY FIRING MEMBER TO TWO DIFFERENT SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,892, entitled SURGICAL SYSTEM

COMPRISING A FIRING MEMBER ROTATABLE INTO AN ARTICULATION STATE TO ARTICULATE AN END EFFECTOR OF THE SURGICAL SYSTEM;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,894, entitled SHAFT ASSEMBLY

COMPRISING A LOCKOUT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,895, entitled SHAFT ASSEMBLY

COMPRISING FIRST AND SECOND ARTICULATION LOCKOUTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,916, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,918, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,919, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,921 , entitled SURGICAL STAPLE/FASTENER CARTRIDGE WITH MOVABLE CAMMING MEMBER CONFIGURED TO DISENGAGE FIRING MEMBER LOCKOUT FEATURES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,923, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,925, entitled JAW ACTUATED LOCK

ARRANGEMENTS FOR PREVENTING ADVANCEMENT OF A FIRING MEMBER IN A SURGICAL END EFFECTOR UNLESS AN UNFIRED CARTRIDGE IS INSTALLED IN THE END EFFECTOR;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,926, entitled AXIALLY MOVABLE CLOSURE SYSTEM ARRANGEMENTS FOR APPLYING CLOSURE MOTIONS TO JAWS OF SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,928, entitled PROTECTIVE COVER

ARRANGEMENTS FOR A JOINT INTERFACE BETWEEN A MOVABLE JAW AND ACTUATOR SHAFT OF A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,930, entitled SURGICAL END EFFECTOR WITH TWO SEPARATE COOPERATING OPENING FEATURES FOR OPENING AND CLOSING END EFFECTOR JAWS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,932, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL END EFFECTOR WITH ASYMMETRIC SHAFT ARRANGEMENT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,933, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENT WITH INDEPENDENT PIVOTABLE LINKAGE DISTAL OF AN ARTICULATION LOCK;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,934, entitled ARTICULATION LOCK

ARRANGEMENTS FOR LOCKING AN END EFFECTOR IN AN ARTICULATED POSITION IN RESPONSE TO ACTUATION OF A JAW CLOSURE SYSTEM;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,935, entitled LATERALLY ACTUATABLE ARTICULATION LOCK ARRANGEMENTS FOR LOCKING AN END EFFECTOR OF A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT IN AN ARTICULATED CONFIGURATION; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/385,936, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH ARTICULATION STROKE AMPLIFICATION FEATURES.

[0115] Applicant of the present application owns the following U.S. Patent Applications that were filed on June 24, 2016 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entireties:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/191 ,775, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE

COMPRISING WIRE STAPLES AND STAMPED STAPLES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/191 ,807, entitled STAPLING SYSTEM FOR USE WITH WIRE STAPLES AND STAMPED STAPLES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/191 ,834, entitled STAMPED STAPLES AND STAPLE CARTRIDGES USING THE SAME;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/191 ,788, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE

COMPRISING OVERDRIVEN STAPLES; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/191 ,818, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE

COMPRISING OFFSET LONGITUDINAL STAPLE ROWS.

[0116] Applicant of the present application owns the following U.S. Patent Applications that were filed on June 24, 2016 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entireties:

U.S. Design Patent Application Serial No. 29/569,218, entitled SURGICAL FASTENER; U.S. Design Patent Application Serial No. 29/569,227, entitled SURGICAL FASTENER; U.S. Design Patent Application Serial No. 29/569,259, entitled SURGICAL FASTENER CARTRIDGE; and

U.S. Design Patent Application Serial No. 29/569,264, entitled SURGICAL FASTENER CARTRIDGE.

[0117] Applicant of the present application owns the following patent applications that were filed on April 1 , 2016 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,325, entitled METHOD FOR OPERATING A SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,321 , entitled MODULAR SURGICAL

STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING A DISPLAY;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,326, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING A DISPLAY INCLUDING A RE-ORIENTABLE DISPLAY FIELD;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,263, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT HANDLE ASSEMBLY WITH RECONFIGURABLE GRIP PORTION;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,262, entitled ROTARY POWERED

SURGICAL INSTRUMENT WITH MANUALLY ACTUATABLE BAILOUT SYSTEM;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,277, entitled SURGICAL CUTTING AND STAPLING END EFFECTOR WITH ANVIL CONCENTRIC DRIVE MEMBER;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,296, entitled INTERCHANGEABLE

SURGICAL TOOL ASSEMBLY WITH A SURGICAL END EFFECTOR THAT IS SELECTIVELY ROTATABLE ABOUT A SHAFT AXIS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,258, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING A SHIFTABLE TRANSMISSION;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,278, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM CONFIGURED TO PROVIDE SELECTIVE CUTTING OF TISSUE;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,284, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING A CONTOURABLE SHAFT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,295, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING A TISSUE COMPRESSION LOCKOUT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,300, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING AN UNCLAMPING LOCKOUT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,196, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING A JAW CLOSURE LOCKOUT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,203, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING A JAW ATTACHMENT LOCKOUT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,210, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING A SPENT CARTRIDGE LOCKOUT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,324, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING A SHIFTING MECHANISM;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,335, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

INSTRUMENT COMPRISING MULTIPLE LOCKOUTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,339, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

INSTRUMENT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,253, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM CONFIGURED TO APPLY ANNULAR ROWS OF STAPLES HAVING DIFFERENT HEIGHTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,304, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING A GROOVED FORMING POCKET;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,331 , entitled ANVIL MODIFICATION

MEMBERS FOR SURGICAL STAPLE/FASTENERS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,336, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGES WITH ATRAUMATIC FEATURES;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,312, entitled CIRCULAR STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING AN INCISABLE TISSUE SUPPORT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,309, entitled CIRCULAR STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING ROTARY FIRING SYSTEM; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/089,349, entitled CIRCULAR STAPLING SYSTEM COMPRISING LOAD CONTROL.

[0118] Applicant of the present application also owns the U.S. Patent Applications identified below which were filed on December 31 , 2015 which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/984,488, entitled MECHANISMS FOR

COMPENSATING FOR BATTERY PACK FAILURE IN POWERED SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/984,525, entitled MECHANISMS FOR

COMPENSATING FOR DRIVETRAIN FAILURE IN POWERED SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/984,552, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH SEPARABLE MOTORS AND MOTOR CONTROL CIRCUITS.

[0119] Applicant of the present application also owns the U.S. Patent Applications identified below which were filed on February 9, 2016 which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,220, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT WITH ARTICULATING AND AXIALLY TRANSLATABLE END EFFECTOR;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,228, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH MULTIPLE LINK ARTICULATION ARRANGEMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,196, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT ARTICULATION MECHANISM WITH SLOTTED SECONDARY CONSTRAINT;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,206, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH AN END EFFECTOR THAT IS HIGHLY ARTICULATABLE RELATIVE TO AN ELONGATE SHAFT ASSEMBLY;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,215, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH NON-SYMMETRICAL ARTICULATION ARRANGEMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,227, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH SINGLE ARTICULATION LINK ARRANGEMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,235, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH TENSIONING ARRANGEMENTS FOR CABLE DRIVEN ARTICULATION SYSTEMS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,230, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH OFF-AXIS FIRING BEAM ARRANGEMENTS; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,245, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH CLOSURE STROKE REDUCTION ARRANGEMENTS.

[0120] Applicant of the present application also owns the U.S. Patent Applications identified below which were filed on February 12, 2016 which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/043,254, entitled MECHANISMS FOR

COMPENSATING FOR DRIVETRAIN FAILURE IN POWERED SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/043,259, entitled MECHANISMS FOR

COMPENSATING FOR DRIVETRAIN FAILURE IN POWERED SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/043,275, entitled MECHANISMS FOR

COMPENSATING FOR DRIVETRAIN FAILURE IN POWERED SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/043,289, entitled MECHANISMS FOR

COMPENSATING FOR DRIVETRAIN FAILURE IN POWERED SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS.

[0121] Applicant of the present application owns the following patent applications that were filed on June 18, 2015 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/742,925, entitled SURGICAL END EFFECTORS WITH POSITIVE JAW OPENING ARRANGEMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0367256;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/742,941 , entitled SURGICAL END EFFECTORS WITH DUAL CAM ACTUATED JAW CLOSING FEATURES, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0367248;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/742,914, entitled MOVABLE FIRING BEAM SUPPORT ARRANGEMENTS FOR ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0367255;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/742,900, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH COMPOSITE FIRING BEAM STRUCTURES WITH CENTER FIRING SUPPORT MEMBER FOR ARTICULATION SUPPORT, now U.S. Patent Application

Publication No. 2016/0367254;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/742,885, entitled DUAL ARTICULATION DRIVE SYSTEM ARRANGEMENTS FOR ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0367246; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/742,876, entitled PUSH/PULL ARTICULATION DRIVE SYSTEMS FOR ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0367245.

[0122] Applicant of the present application owns the following patent applications that were filed on March 6, 2015 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,746, entitled POWERED SURGICAL INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0256184;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,795, entitled MULTIPLE LEVEL

THRESHOLDS TO MODIFY OPERATION OF POWERED SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/02561 185;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,832, entitled ADAPTIVE TISSUE

COMPRESSION TECHNIQUES TO ADJUST CLOSURE RATES FOR MULTIPLE TISSUE TYPES, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0256154;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,935, entitled OVERLAID MULTI SENSOR RADIO FREQUENCY (RF) ELECTRODE SYSTEM TO MEASURE TISSUE COMPRESSION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0256071 ;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,831 , entitled MONITORING SPEED

CONTROL AND PRECISION INCREMENTING OF MOTOR FOR POWERED SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0256153;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,859, entitled TIME DEPENDENT

EVALUATION OF SENSOR DATA TO DETERMINE STABILITY, CREEP, AND

VISCOELASTIC ELEMENTS OF MEASURES, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0256187;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,817, entitled INTERACTIVE FEEDBACK SYSTEM FOR POWERED SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application

Publication No. 2016/0256186;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,844, entitled CONTROL TECHNIQUES AND SUB-PROCESSOR CONTAINED WITHIN MODULAR SHAFT WITH SELECT CONTROL PROCESSING FROM HANDLE, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0256155;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,837, entitled SMART SENSORS WITH LOCAL SIGNAL PROCESSING, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0256163;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,765, entitled SYSTEM FOR DETECTING THE MIS-INSERTION OF A STAPLE CARTRIDGE INTO A SURGICAL STAPLE/FASTENER, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0256160;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,799, entitled SIGNAL AND POWER

COMMUNICATION SYSTEM POSITIONED ON A ROTATABLE SHAFT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0256162; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/640,780, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING A LOCKABLE BATTERY HOUSING, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0256161.

[0123] Applicant of the present application owns the following patent applications that were filed on February 27, 2015, and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/633,576, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT SYSTEM COMPRISING AN INSPECTION STATION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0249919;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/633,546, entitled SURGICAL APPARATUS CONFIGURED TO ASSESS WHETHER A PERFORMANCE PARAMETER OF THE SURGICAL APPARATUS IS WITHIN AN ACCEPTABLE PERFORMANCE BAND, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0249915;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/633,560, entitled SURGICAL CHARGING

SYSTEM THAT CHARGES AND/OR CONDITIONS ONE OR MORE BATTERIES, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0249910;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/633,566, entitled CHARGING SYSTEM THAT ENABLES EMERGENCY RESOLUTIONS FOR CHARGING A BATTERY, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0249918;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/633,555, entitled SYSTEM FOR MONITORING WHETHER A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT NEEDS TO BE SERVICED, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0249916;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/633,542, entitled REINFORCED BATTERY FOR A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0249908;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/633,548, entitled POWER ADAPTER FOR A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0249909;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/633,526, entitled ADAPTABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENT HANDLE, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0249945;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/633,541 , entitled MODULAR STAPLING

ASSEMBLY, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0249927; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/633,562, entitled SURGICAL APPARATUS CONFIGURED TO TRACK AN END-OF-LIFE PARAMETER, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0249917.

[0124] Applicant of the present application owns the following patent applications that were filed on December 18, 2014 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/574,478, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS COMPRISING AN ARTICULATABLE END EFFECTOR AND MEANS FOR ADJUSTING THE FIRING STROKE OF A FIRING MEMBER, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0174977;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/574,483, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT ASSEMBLY COMPRISING LOCKABLE SYSTEMS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0174969;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/575,139, entitled DRIVE ARRANGEMENTS FOR ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0174978;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/575,148, entitled LOCKING ARRANGEMENTS FOR DETACHABLE SHAFT ASSEMBLIES WITH ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL END EFFECTORS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0174976;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/575,130, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT WITH AN ANVIL THAT IS SELECTIVELY MOVABLE ABOUT A DISCRETE NON-MOVABLE AXIS RELATIVE TO A STAPLE CARTRIDGE, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2016/0174972;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/575,143, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH IMPROVED CLOSURE ARRANGEMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0174983;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/575,1 17, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH ARTICULATABLE END EFFECTORS AND MOVABLE FIRING BEAM SUPPORT ARRANGEMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0174975;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/575,154, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH ARTICULATABLE END EFFECTORS AND IMPROVED FIRING BEAM SUPPORT ARRANGEMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0174973;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/574,493, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT ASSEMBLY COMPRISING A FLEXIBLE ARTICULATION SYSTEM, now U.S. Patent

Application Publication No. 2016/0174970; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/574,500, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT ASSEMBLY COMPRISING A LOCKABLE ARTICULATION SYSTEM, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0174971 .

[0125] Applicant of the present application owns the following patent applications that were filed on March 1 , 2013 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/782,295, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH CONDUCTIVE PATHWAYS FOR SIGNAL COMMUNICATION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0246471 ;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/782,323, entitled ROTARY POWERED

ARTICULATION JOINTS FOR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0246472;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/782,338, entitled THUMBWHEEL SWITCH ARRANGEMENTS FOR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0249557;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/782,499, entitled ELECTROMECHANICAL SURGICAL DEVICE WITH SIGNAL RELAY ARRANGEMENT, now U.S. Patent No. 9,358,003;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/782,460, entitled MULTIPLE PROCESSOR MOTOR CONTROL FOR MODULAR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent No.

9,554,794;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/782,358, entitled JOYSTICK SWITCH

ASSEMBLIES FOR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent No. 9,326,767;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/782,481 , entitled SENSOR STRAIGHTENED END EFFECTOR DURING REMOVAL THROUGH TROCAR, now U.S. Patent No. 9,468,438;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/782,518, entitled CONTROL METHODS FOR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH REMOVABLE IMPLEMENT PORTIONS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0246475;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/782,375, entitled ROTARY POWERED

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH MULTIPLE DEGREES OF FREEDOM, now U.S. Patent No. 9,398,91 1 ; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/782,536, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT SOFT STOP, now U.S. Patent No. 9,307,986.

[0126] Applicant of the present application also owns the following patent applications that were filed on March 14, 2013 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,097, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING A FIRING DRIVE, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263542;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803, 193, entitled CONTROL ARRANGEMENTS FOR A DRIVE MEMBER OF A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent No. 9,332,987;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,053, entitled INTERCHANGEABLE SHAFT ASSEMBLIES FOR USE WITH A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263564;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,086, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING AN ARTICULATION LOCK, now U.S. Patent Application

Publication No. 2014/0263541 ;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,210, entitled SENSOR ARRANGEMENTS FOR ABSOLUTE POSITIONING SYSTEM FOR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263538;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,148, entitled MULTI-FUNCTION MOTOR FOR A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263554;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,066, entitled DRIVE SYSTEM LOCKOUT ARRANGEMENTS FOR MODULAR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent No.

9,629,623;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,1 17, entitled ARTICULATION CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent No. 9,351 ,726;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,130, entitled DRIVE TRAIN CONTROL ARRANGEMENTS FOR MODULAR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent No.

9,351 ,727; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,159, entitled METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR OPERATING A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2014/0277017.

[0127] Applicant of the present application also owns the following patent application that was filed on March 7, 2014 and is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/200,1 1 1 , entitled CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent No. 9,629,629.

[0128] Applicant of the present application also owns the following patent applications that were filed on March 26, 2014 and are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226, 106, entitled POWER MANAGEMENT CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application

Publication No. 2015/0272582;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,099, entitled STERILIZATION VERIFICATION CIRCUIT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272581 ;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,094, entitled VERIFICATION OF NUMBER OF BATTERY EXCHANGES/PROCEDURE COUNT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272580;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226, 1 17, entitled POWER MANAGEMENT THROUGH SLEEP OPTIONS OF SEGMENTED CIRCUIT AND WAKE UP CONTROL, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272574;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,075, entitled MODULAR POWERED

SURGICAL INSTRUMENT WITH DETACHABLE SHAFT ASSEMBLIES, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272579;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,093, entitled FEEDBACK ALGORITHMS FOR MANUAL BAILOUT SYSTEMS FOR SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272569;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,1 16, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT UTILIZING SENSOR ADAPTATION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2015/0272571 ;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,071 , entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT CONTROL CIRCUIT HAVING A SAFETY PROCESSOR, now U.S. Patent Application

Publication No. 2015/0272578;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,097, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2015/0272570;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,126, entitled INTERFACE SYSTEMS FOR USE WITH SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2015/0272572;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226, 133, entitled MODULAR SURGICAL

INSTRUMENT SYSTEM, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272557;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,081 , entitled SYSTEMS AND METHODS FOR CONTROLLING A SEGMENTED CIRCUIT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2015/0277471 ;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,076, entitled POWER MANAGEMENT THROUGH SEGMENTED CIRCUIT AND VARIABLE VOLTAGE PROTECTION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0280424;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,1 1 1 , entitled SURGICAL STAPLING

INSTRUMENT SYSTEM, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272583; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,125, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING A ROTATABLE SHAFT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2015/0280384.

[0129] Applicant of the present application also owns the following patent applications that were filed on September 5, 2014 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/479,103, entitled CIRCUITRY AND SENSORS FOR POWERED MEDICAL DEVICE, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2016/0066912;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/479,1 19, entitled ADJUNCT WITH INTEGRATED SENSORS TO QUANTIFY TISSUE COMPRESSION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0066914;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/478,908, entitled MONITORING DEVICE

DEGRADATION BASED ON COMPONENT EVALUATION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0066910;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/478,895, entitled MULTIPLE SENSORS WITH ONE SENSOR AFFECTING A SECOND SENSOR'S OUTPUT OR INTERPRETATION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0066909;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/479,1 10, entitled POLARITY OF HALL MAGNET TO DETECT MISLOADED CARTRIDGE, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2016/0066915;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/479,098, entitled SMART CARTRIDGE WAKE UP OPERATION AND DATA RETENTION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2016/006691 1 ;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/479,1 15, entitled MULTIPLE MOTOR CONTROL FOR POWERED MEDICAL DEVICE, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2016/0066916; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/479, 108, entitled LOCAL DISPLAY OF TISSUE PARAMETER STABILIZATION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2016/0066913.

[0130] Applicant of the present application also owns the following patent applications that were filed on April 9, 2014 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/248,590, entitled MOTOR DRIVEN SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH LOCKABLE DUAL DRIVE SHAFTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0305987;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/248,581 , entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING A CLOSING DRIVE AND A FIRING DRIVE OPERATED FROM THE SAME ROT ATABLE OUTPUT, now U.S. Patent 9,649,1 10;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/248,595, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT SHAFT INCLUDING SWITCHES FOR CONTROLLING THE OPERATION OF THE SURGICAL INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0305988;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/248,588, entitled POWERED LINEAR SURGICAL STAPLE/FASTENER, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0309666;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/248,591 , entitled TRANSMISSION

ARRANGEMENT FOR A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0305991 ;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/248,584, entitled MODULAR MOTOR DRIVEN SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH ALIGNMENT FEATURES FOR ALIGNING ROTARY DRIVE

SHAFTS WITH SURGICAL END EFFECTOR SHAFTS, now U.S. Patent Application

Publication No. 2014/0305994;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/248,587, entitled POWERED SURGICAL

STAPLE/FASTENER, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0309665;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/248,586, entitled DRIVE SYSTEM DECOUPLING ARRANGEMENT FOR A SURGICAL INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0305990; and

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/248,607, entitled MODULAR MOTOR DRIVEN SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH STATUS INDICATION ARRANGEMENTS, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0305992.

[0131] Applicant of the present application also owns the following patent applications that were filed on April 16, 2013 and which are each herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety:

U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 61/812,365, entitled SURGICAL

INSTRUMENT WITH MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS PERFORMED BY A SINGLE MOTOR;

U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 61/812,376, entitled LINEAR CUTTER WITH POWER;

U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 61/812,382, entitled LINEAR CUTTER WITH MOTOR AND PISTOL GRIP;

U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 61/812,385, entitled SURGICAL

INSTRUMENT HANDLE WITH MULTIPLE ACTUATION MOTORS AND MOTOR CONTROL; and

U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 61/812,372, entitled SURGICAL

INSTRUMENT WITH MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS PERFORMED BY A SINGLE MOTOR.

[0132] Numerous specific details are set forth to provide a thorough understanding of the overall structure, function, manufacture, and use of the embodiments as described in the specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Well-known operations, components, and elements have not been described in detail so as not to obscure the embodiments described in the specification. The reader will understand that the embodiments described and illustrated herein are non-limiting examples, and thus it can be appreciated that the specific structural and functional details disclosed herein may be representative and illustrative. Variations and changes thereto may be made without departing from the scope of the claims.

[0133] The terms "comprise" (and any form of comprise, such as "comprises" and "comprising"), "have" (and any form of have, such as "has" and "having"), "include" (and any form of include, such as "includes" and "including") and "contain" (and any form of contain, such as "contains" and "containing") are open-ended linking verbs. As a result, a surgical system, device, or apparatus that "comprises," "has," "includes" or "contains" one or more elements possesses those one or more elements, but is not limited to possessing only those one or more elements. Likewise, an element of a system, device, or apparatus that "comprises," "has," "includes" or "contains" one or more features possesses those one or more features, but is not limited to possessing only those one or more features.

[0134] The terms "proximal" and "distal" are used herein with reference to a clinician manipulating the handle portion of the surgical instrument. The term "proximal" refers to the portion closest to the clinician and the term "distal" refers to the portion located away from the clinician. It will be further appreciated that, for convenience and clarity, spatial terms such as "vertical", "horizontal", "up", and "down" may be used herein with respect to the drawings.

However, surgical instruments are used in many orientations and positions, and these terms are not intended to be limiting and/or absolute.

[0135] Various exemplary devices and methods are provided for performing laparoscopic and minimally invasive surgical procedures. However, the reader will readily appreciate that the various methods and devices disclosed herein can be used in numerous surgical procedures and applications including, for example, in connection with open surgical procedures. As the present Detailed Description proceeds, the reader will further appreciate that the various instruments disclosed herein can be inserted into a body in any way, such as through a natural orifice, through an incision or puncture hole formed in tissue, etc. The working portions or end effector portions of the instruments can be inserted directly into a patient's body or can be inserted through an access device that has a working channel through which the end effector and elongate shaft of a surgical instrument can be advanced.

[0136] A surgical stapling system can comprise a shaft and an end effector extending from the shaft. The end effector comprises a first jaw and a second jaw. The first jaw comprises a staple cartridge. The staple cartridge is insertable into and removable from the first jaw; however, other embodiments are envisioned in which a staple cartridge is not removable from, or at least readily replaceable from, the first jaw. The second jaw comprises an anvil configured to deform staples ejected from the staple cartridge. The second jaw is pivotable relative to the first jaw about a closure axis; however, other embodiments are envisioned in which the first jaw is pivotable relative to the second jaw. The surgical stapling system further comprises an

articulation joint configured to permit the end effector to be rotated, or articulated, relative to the shaft. The end effector is rotatable about an articulation axis extending through the articulation joint. Other embodiments are envisioned which do not include an articulation joint.

[0137] The staple cartridge comprises a cartridge body. The cartridge body includes a proximal end, a distal end, and a deck extending between the proximal end and the distal end. In use, the staple cartridge is positioned on a first side of the tissue to be stapled and the anvil is positioned on a second side of the tissue. The anvil is moved toward the staple cartridge to compress and clamp the tissue against the deck. Thereafter, staples removably stored in the cartridge body can be deployed into the tissue. The cartridge body includes staple cavities defined therein wherein staples are removably stored in the staple cavities. The staple cavities are arranged in six longitudinal rows. Three rows of staple cavities are positioned on a first side of a longitudinal slot and three rows of staple cavities are positioned on a second side of the longitudinal slot. Other arrangements of staple cavities and staples may be possible.

[0138] The staples are supported by staple drivers in the cartridge body. The drivers are movable between a first, or unfired position, and a second, or fired, position to eject the staples from the staple cavities. The drivers are retained in the cartridge body by a retainer which extends around the bottom of the cartridge body and includes resilient members configured to grip the cartridge body and hold the retainer to the cartridge body. The drivers are movable between their unfired positions and their fired positions by a sled. The sled is movable between a proximal position adjacent the proximal end and a distal position adjacent the distal end. The sled comprises a plurality of ramped surfaces configured to slide under the drivers and lift the drivers, and the staples supported thereon, toward the anvil.

[0139] Further to the above, the sled is moved distally by a firing member. The firing member is configured to contact the sled and push the sled toward the distal end. The longitudinal slot defined in the cartridge body is configured to receive the firing member. The anvil also includes a slot configured to receive the firing member. The firing member further comprises a first cam which engages the first jaw and a second cam which engages the second jaw. As the firing member is advanced distally, the first cam and the second cam can control the distance, or tissue gap, between the deck of the staple cartridge and the anvil. The firing member also comprises a knife configured to incise the tissue captured intermediate the staple cartridge and the anvil. It is desirable for the knife to be positioned at least partially proximal to the ramped surfaces such that the staples are ejected ahead of the knife.

[0140] FIG. 1 depicts a motor-driven surgical system 10 that may be used to perform a variety of different surgical procedures. As can be seen in that Figure, one example of the surgical

system 10 includes four interchangeable surgical tool assemblies 100, 200, 300, and 1000 that are each adapted for interchangeable use with a handle assembly 500. Each interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100, 200, 300, and 1000 may be designed for use in connection with the performance of one or more specific surgical procedures. In another surgical system

embodiment, the interchangeable surgical tool assemblies may be effectively employed with a tool drive assembly of a robotically controlled or automated surgical system. For example, the surgical tool assemblies disclosed herein may be employed with various robotic systems, instruments, components and methods such as, but not limited to, those disclosed in U.S.

Patent No. 9,072,535, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENTS WITH ROTATABLE STAPLE DEPLOYMENT ARRANGEMENTS, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

[0141] FIG. 2 illustrates one form of an interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 that is operably coupled to the handle assembly 500. FIG. 3 illustrates attachment of the

interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 to the handle assembly 500. The attachment arrangement and process depicted in FIG. 3 may also be employed in connection with attachment of any of the interchangeable surgical tool assemblies 100, 200, 300, and 1000 to a tool drive portion or tool drive housing of a robotic system. The handle assembly 500 may comprise a handle housing 502 that includes a pistol grip portion 504 that can be gripped and manipulated by the clinician. As will be briefly discussed below, the handle assembly 500 operably supports a plurality of drive systems that are configured to generate and apply various control motions to corresponding portions of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100, 200, 300, and/or 1000 that is operably attached thereto.

[0142] Referring now to FIG. 3, the handle assembly 500 may further include a frame 506 that operably supports the plurality of drive systems. For example, the frame 506 can operably support a first or closure drive system, generally designated as 510, which may be employed to apply closing and opening motions to the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100, 200, 300, and 1000 that is operably attached or coupled to the handle assembly 500. In at least one form, the closure drive system 510 may include an actuator in the form of a closure trigger 512 that is pivotally supported by the frame 506. Such an arrangement enables the closure trigger 512 to be manipulated by a clinician such that, when the clinician grips the pistol grip portion 504 of the handle assembly 500, the closure trigger 512 may be pivoted from a starting or "unactuated" position to an "actuated" position and more particularly to a fully compressed or fully actuated position. In various forms, the closure drive system 510 further includes a closure linkage assembly 514 that is pivotally coupled to the closure trigger 512 or otherwise operably

interfaces therewith. As will be discussed in further detail below, the closure linkage assembly 514 includes a transverse attachment pin 516 that facilitates attachment to a corresponding drive system on the surgical tool assembly. To actuate the closure drive system, the clinician depresses the closure trigger 512 towards the pistol grip portion 504. As described in further detail in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/226,142, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING A SENSOR SYSTEM, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2015/0272575, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety herein, the closure drive system is configured to lock the closure trigger 512 into the fully depressed or fully actuated position when the clinician fully depresses the closure trigger 512 to attain the full closure stroke. When the clinician desires to unlock the closure trigger 512 to permit the closure trigger 512 to be biased to the unactuated position, the clinician simply activates a closure release button assembly 518 which enables the closure trigger to return to unactuated position. The closure release button 518 may also be configured to interact with various sensors that communicate with a microcontroller 520 in the handle assembly 500 for tracking the position of the closure trigger 512. Further details concerning the configuration and operation of the closure release button assembly 518 may be found in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272575.

[0143] In at least one form, the handle assembly 500 and the frame 506 may operably support another drive system referred to herein as a firing drive system 530 that is configured to apply firing motions to corresponding portions of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly that is attached thereto. As was described in detail in U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2015/0272575, the firing drive system 530 may employ an electric motor (not shown in FIGS. 1 -3) that is located in the pistol grip portion 504 of the handle assembly 500. In various forms, the motor may be a DC brushed driving motor having a maximum speed of approximately 25,000 RPM, for example. In other arrangements, the motor may include a brushless motor, a cordless motor, a synchronous motor, a stepper motor, or any other suitable electric motor. The motor may be powered by a power source 522 that in one form may comprise a removable power pack. The power pack may support a plurality of Lithium Ion ("LI") or other suitable batteries therein. A number of batteries may be connected in series may be used as the power source 522 for the surgical system 10. In addition, the power source 522 may be replaceable and/or rechargeable.

[0144] The electric motor is configured to axially drive a longitudinally movable drive member 540 in distal and proximal directions depending upon the polarity of the voltage applied to the motor. For example, when the motor is driven in one rotary direction, the longitudinally movable drive member 540 the will be axially driven in the distal direction "DD". When the motor is driven in the opposite rotary direction, the longitudinally movable drive member 540 will be axially driven in a proximal direction "PD". The handle assembly 500 can include a switch 513 which can be configured to reverse the polarity applied to the electric motor by the power source 522 or otherwise control the motor. The handle assembly 500 can also include a sensor or sensors that are configured to detect the position of the drive member 540 and/or the direction in which the drive member 540 is being moved. Actuation of the motor can be controlled by a firing trigger 532 (FIG. 1 ) that is pivotally supported on the handle assembly 500. The firing trigger 532 may be pivoted between an unactuated position and an actuated position. The firing trigger 532 may be biased into the unactuated position by a spring or other biasing arrangement such that, when the clinician releases the firing trigger 532, the firing trigger 532 may be pivoted or otherwise returned to the unactuated position by the spring or biasing arrangement. In at least one form, the firing trigger 532 can be positioned "outboard" of the closure trigger 512 as was discussed above. As discussed in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272575, the handle assembly 500 may be equipped with a firing trigger safety button to prevent inadvertent actuation of the firing trigger 532. When the closure trigger 512 is in the unactuated position, the safety button is contained in the handle assembly 500 where the clinician cannot readily access the safety button and move it between a safety position preventing actuation of the firing trigger 532 and a firing position wherein the firing trigger 532 may be fired. As the clinician depresses the closure trigger 512, the safety button and the firing trigger 532 pivot downwardly where they can then be manipulated by the clinician.

[0145] In at least one form, the longitudinally movable drive member 540 may have a rack of teeth formed thereon for meshing engagement with a corresponding drive gear arrangement that interfaces with the motor. Further details regarding those features may be found in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272575. In at least one form, the handle assembly 500 also includes a manually-actuatable "bailout" assembly that is configured to enable the clinician to manually retract the longitudinally movable drive member 540 should the motor become disabled. The bailout assembly may include a lever or bailout handle assembly that is stored within the handle assembly 500 under a releasable door 550. The lever is configured to be manually pivoted into ratcheting engagement with the teeth in the drive member 540. Thus, the clinician can manually retract the drive member 540 by using the bailout handle assembly to ratchet the drive member 5400 in the proximal direction "PD". U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 12/249, 1 17, entitled POWERED SURGICAL CUTTING AND STAPLING APPARATUS WITH MANUALLY RETRACTABLE FIRING SYSTEM, now U.S. Patent No. 8,608,045, the

entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein, discloses bailout arrangements that may also be employed with the various surgical tool assemblies disclosed herein.

[0146] Turning now to FIG. 2, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 includes a surgical end effector 1 10 that comprises a first jaw and a second jaw. In one arrangement, the first jaw comprises an elongate channel 1 12 that is configured to operably support a surgical staple cartridge 1 16 therein. The second jaw comprises an anvil 1 14 that is pivotally supported relative to the elongate channel 1 12. The interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 also includes a lockable articulation joint 120 which can be configured to releasably hold the end effector 1 10 in a desired position relative to a shaft axis SA. Details regarding various constructions and operation of the end effector 1 10, the articulation joint 120 and the articulation lock are set forth in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,086, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING AN ARTICULATION LOCK, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541 , which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. As can be further seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 can include a proximal housing or nozzle 130 and a closure tube assembly 140 which can be utilized to close and/or open the anvil 1 14 of the end effector 1 10. As discussed in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2015/0272575, the closure tube assembly 140 is movably supported on a spine 145 which supports an articulation driver arrangement 147 configured to apply articulation motions to the surgical end effector 1 10. The spine 145 is configured to, one, slidably support a firing bar 170 therein and, two, slidably support the closure tube assembly 140 which extends around the spine 145. In various circumstances, the spine 145 includes a proximal end that is rotatably supported in a chassis 150. See FIG. 3. In one arrangement, for example, the proximal end of the spine 145 is attached to a spine bearing that is configured to be supported within the chassis 150. Such an arrangement facilitates the rotatable attachment of the spine 145 to the chassis 150 such that the spine 145 may be selectively rotated about a shaft axis SA relative to the chassis 150.

[0147] Still referring to FIG. 3, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 includes a closure shuttle 160 that is slidably supported within the chassis 150 such that the closure shuttle 160 may be axially moved relative to the chassis 150. As can be seen in FIG. 3, the closure shuttle 160 includes a pair of proximally-protruding hooks 162 that are configured to be attached to the attachment pin 516 that is attached to the closure linkage assembly 514 in the handle assembly 500. A proximal closure tube segment 146 of the closure tube assembly 140 is rotatably coupled to the closure shuttle 160. Thus, when the hooks 162 are hooked over the pin

516, actuation of the closure trigger 512 will result in the axial movement of the closure shuttle 160 and, ultimately, the closure tube assembly 140 on the spine 145. A closure spring may also be journaled on the closure tube assembly 140 and serves to bias the closure tube assembly 140 in the proximal direction "PD" which can serve to pivot the closure trigger 512 into the unactuated position when the shaft assembly 100 is operably coupled to the handle assembly 500. In use, the closure tube assembly 140 is translated distally (direction DD) to close the anvil 1 14 in response to the actuation of the closure trigger 512. The closure tube assembly 140 includes a distal closure tube segment 142 that is pivotally pinned to a distal end of a proximal closure tube segment 146. The distal closure tube segment 142 is configured to axially move with the proximal closure tube segment 146 relative to the surgical end effector 1 10. When the distal end of the distal closure tube segment 142 strikes a proximal surface or ledge 1 15 on the anvil 1 14, the anvil 1 14 is pivoted closed. Further details concerning the closure of anvil 1 14 may be found in the aforementioned U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541 and will be discussed in further detail below. As was also described in detail in U.S. Patent

Application Publication No. 2014/0263541 , the anvil 1 14 is opened by proximally translating the distal closure tube segment 142. The distal closure tube segment 142 has a horseshoe aperture 143 therein that defines a downwardly extending return tab that cooperates with an anvil tab 1 17 formed on the proximal end of the anvil 1 14 to pivot the anvil 1 14 back to an open position. In the fully open position, the closure tube assembly 140 is in its proximal-most or unactuated position.

[0148] As was also indicated above, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 further includes a firing bar 170 that is supported for axial travel within the shaft spine 145. The firing bar 170 includes an intermediate firing shaft portion that is configured to be attached to a distal cutting portion or knife bar that is configured for axial travel through the surgical end effector 1 10. In at least one arrangement, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 includes a clutch assembly which can be configured to selectively and releasably couple the articulation driver to the firing bar 170. Further details regarding the clutch assembly features and operation may be found in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541 . As discussed in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541 , distal movement of the firing bar 170 can move the articulation driver arrangement 147 distally and, correspondingly, proximal movement of the firing bar 170 can move the articulation driver arrangement 147 proximally when the clutch assembly is in its engaged position. When the clutch assembly is in its disengaged position, movement of the firing bar 170 is not transmitted to the articulation driver arrangement 147 and, as a result, the firing bar 170 can move independently of the articulation driver

arrangement 147. The interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 may also include a slip ring assembly which can be configured to conduct electrical power to and/or from the end effector 1 10 and/or communicate signals to and/or from the end effector 1 10. Further details regarding the slip ring assembly may be found in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541. U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/800,067, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE TISSUE

THICKNESS SENSOR SYSTEM, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263552 is incorporated by reference in its entirety. U.S. Patent No. 9,345,481 , entitled STAPLE

CARTRIDGE TISSUE THICKNESS SENSOR SYSTEM, is also hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

[0149] Still referring to FIG. 3, the chassis 150 has one or more tapered attachment portions 152 formed thereon that are adapted to be received within corresponding dovetail slots 507 formed within a distal end of the frame 506. Each dovetail slot 507 may be tapered or, stated another way, may be somewhat V-shaped to seatingly receive the tapered attachment portions 152 therein. As can be further seen in FIG. 3, a shaft attachment lug 172 is formed on the proximal end of the firing shaft 170. When the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 is coupled to the handle assembly 500, the shaft attachment lug 172 is received in a firing shaft attachment cradle 542 formed in the distal end of the longitudinally movable drive member 540. The interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 also employs a latch system 180 for releasably latching the shaft assembly 100 to the frame 506 of the handle assembly 500. In at least one form, the latch system 180 includes a lock member or lock yoke 182 that is movably coupled to the chassis 150, for example. The lock yoke 182 includes two proximally protruding lock lugs 184 that are configured for releasable engagement with corresponding lock detents or grooves 509 in the distal attachment flange of the frame 506. In various forms, the lock yoke 182 is biased in the proximal direction by spring or biasing member. Actuation of the lock yoke 182 may be accomplished by a latch button 186 that is slidably mounted on a latch actuator assembly that is mounted to the chassis 150. The latch button 186 may be biased in a proximal direction relative to the lock yoke 182. As will be discussed in further detail below, the lock yoke 182 may be moved to an unlocked position by biasing the latch button 186 the in distal direction DD which also causes the lock yoke 182 to pivot out of retaining engagement with the distal attachment flange of the frame 506. When the lock yoke 182 is in retaining engagement with the distal attachment flange of the frame 506, the lock lugs 184 are retainingly seated within the corresponding lock detents or grooves 509 in the distal end of the frame 506. Further details concerning the latching system may be found in U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2014/0263541 .

[0150] To attach the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 to the handle assembly 500 A clinician may position the chassis 150 of the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 above or adjacent to the distal end of the frame 506 such that the tapered attachment portions 152 formed on the chassis 150 are aligned with the dovetail slots 507 in the frame 506. The clinician may then move the surgical tool assembly 100 along an installation axis IA that is perpendicular to the shaft axis SA to seat the tapered attachment portions 152 in operable engagement with the corresponding dovetail receiving slots 507 in the distal end of the frame 506. In doing so, the shaft attachment lug 172 on the firing shaft 170 will also be seated in the cradle 542 in the longitudinally movable drive member 540 and the portions of pin 516 on the closure link 514 will be seated in the corresponding hooks 162 in the closure shuttle 160. As used herein, the term "operable engagement" in the context of two components means that the two components are sufficiently engaged with each other so that, upon application of an actuation motion thereto, the components carry out their intended action, function, and/or procedure.

[0151] Returning now to FIG. 1 , the surgical system 10 includes four interchangeable surgical tool assemblies 100, 200, 300, and 1000 that may each be effectively employed with the same handle assembly 500 to perform different surgical procedures. The construction of an exemplary form of interchangeable surgical tool assembly 100 was briefly discussed above and is discussed in further detail in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541 . Various details regarding interchangeable surgical tool assemblies 200 and 300 may be found in the various U.S. Patent Applications which have been incorporated by reference herein. Various details regarding interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 will be discussed in further detail below.

[0152] As illustrated in FIG. 1 , each of the surgical tool assemblies 100, 200, 300, and 1000 includes a pair of jaws wherein at least one of the jaws is movable to capture, manipulate, and/or clamp tissue between the two jaws. The movable jaw is moved between open and closed positions upon the application of closure and opening motions applied thereto from the handle assembly or the robotic or automated surgical system to which the surgical tool assembly is operably coupled. In addition, each of the illustrated interchangeable surgical tool assemblies includes a firing member that is configured to cut tissue and fire staples from a staple cartridge that is supported in one of the jaws in response to firing motions applied thereto by the handle assembly or robotic system. Each surgical tool assembly may be uniquely designed to perform a specific procedure, for example, to cut and fasten a particular type of and thickness of tissue within a certain area in the body. The closing, firing and articulation control systems in the handle assembly 500 or robotic system may be configured to generate axial control motions and/or rotary control motions depending upon the type of closing, firing, and articulation system configurations that are employed in the surgical tool assembly. In one arrangement, one of the closure system control components moves axially from an unactuated position to its fully actuated position when a closure control system in the handle assembly or robotic system is fully actuated. The axial distance that the closure tube assembly moves between its unactuated position to its fully actuated position may be referred to herein as its "closure stroke length". Similarly, one of the firing system control components moves axially from its unactuated position to its fully actuated or fired position when a firing system in the handle assembly or robotic system is fully actuated. The axial distance that the longitudinally movable drive member moves between its unactuated position and its fully fired position may be referred to herein as its "firing stroke length". For those surgical tool assemblies that employ articulatable end effector arrangements, the handle assembly or robotic system may employ articulation control components that move axially through an "articulation drive stroke length". In many circumstances, the closure stroke length, the firing stroke length, and the articulation drive stroke length are fixed for a particular handle assembly or robotic system. Thus, each of the surgical tool assemblies must be able to accommodate control movements of the closure, firing, and/or articulation components through each of their entire stroke lengths without placing undue stress on the surgical tool components which might lead to damage the surgical tool assembly.

[0153] Turning now to FIGS. 4-10, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 includes a surgical end effector 1 100 that comprises an elongate channel 1 102 that is configured to operably support a staple cartridge 1 1 10 therein. The end effector 1 100 may further include an anvil 1 130 that is pivotally supported relative to the elongate channel 1 102. The

interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 may further include an articulation joint 1200 and an articulation lock 1210 (FIGS. 5 and 8-10) which can be configured to releasably hold the end effector 1 100 in a desired articulated position relative to a shaft axis SA. Details regarding the construction and operation of the articulation lock 1210 may be found in in U.S. Patent

Application Serial No. 13/803,086, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING AN ARTICULATION LOCK, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No.

2014/0263541 , the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein.

Additional details concerning the articulation lock may also be found in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,196, filed February 9, 2016, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT

ARTICULATION MECHANISM WITH SLOTTED SECONDARY CONSTRAINT, the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein. As can be seen in FIG. 7, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 can further include a proximal housing or nozzle 1300 comprised of nozzle portions 1302, 1304 as well as an actuator wheel portion 1306 that is configured to be coupled to the assembled nozzle portions 1302, 1304 by snaps, lugs, and/or screws, for example. The interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 can further include a closure tube assembly 1400 which can be utilized to close and/or open the anvil 1 130 of the end effector 1 100 as will be discussed in further detail below. Primarily referring now to FIGS. 8 and 9, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 can include a spine assembly 1500 which can be configured to support the articulation lock 1210. The spine assembly 1500 comprises an "elastic" spine or frame member 1510 which will be described in further detail below. A distal end portion 1522 of the elastic spine member 1510 is attached to a distal frame segment 1560 that operably supports the articulation lock 1210 therein. As can be seen in FIGS. 7 and 8, the spine assembly 1500 is configured to, one, slidably support a firing member assembly 1600 therein and, two, slidably support the closure tube assembly 1400 which extends around the spine assembly 1500. The spine assembly 1500 can also be configured to slidably support a proximal articulation driver 1700.

[0154] As can be seen in FIG. 10, the distal frame segment 1560 is pivotally coupled to the elongate channel 1 102 by an end effector mounting assembly 1230. In one arrangement, the distal end 1562 of the distal frame segment 1560 has a pivot pin 1564 formed thereon, for example. The pivot pin 1564 is adapted to be pivotally received within a pivot hole 1234 formed in pivot base portion 1232 of the end effector mounting assembly 1230. The end effector mounting assembly 1230 is attached to the proximal end 1 103 of the elongate channel 1 102 by a spring pin 1 108 or other suitable member. The pivot pin 1564 defines an articulation axis B-B that is transverse to the shaft axis SA. See FIG. 4. Such an arrangement facilitates pivotal travel (i.e., articulation) of the end effector 1 100 about the articulation axis B-B relative to the spine assembly 1500.

[0155] Still referring to FIG. 10, the articulation driver 1700 has a distal end 1702 that is configured to operably engage the articulation lock 1210. The articulation lock 1210 includes an articulation frame 1212 that is adapted to operably engage a drive pin 1238 on the pivot base portion 1232 of the end effector mounting assembly 1230. In addition, a cross-link 1237 may be linked to the drive pin 1238 and articulation frame 1212 to assist articulation of the end effector 1 100. As indicated above, further details regarding the operation of the articulation lock 1210 and the articulation frame 1212 may be found in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,086, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541. Further details regarding the end effector mounting assembly and a crosslink may be found in U.S. Patent Application Serial No.

15/019,245, filed February 9, 2016, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH CLOSURE STROKE REDUCTION ARRANGEMENTS, the entire disclosure of which is hereby

incorporated by reference herein. In various circumstances, the elastic spine member 1510 includes a proximal end 1514 which is rotatably supported in a chassis 1800. In one arrangement, the proximal end 1514 of the elastic spine member 1510 has a thread 1516 formed thereon for threaded attachment to a spine bearing that is configured to be supported within the chassis 1800, for example. Such an arrangement facilitates rotatable attachment of the elastic spine member 1510 to the chassis 1800 such that the spine assembly 1500 may be selectively rotated about a shaft axis SA relative to the chassis 1800.

[0156] Referring primarily to FIG. 7, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 includes a closure shuttle 1420 that is slidably supported within the chassis 1800 such that the closure shuttle 1420 may be axially moved relative to the chassis 1800. In one form, the closure shuttle 1420 includes a pair of proximally-protruding hooks 1421 that are configured to be attached to the attachment pin 516 that is attached to the closure linkage assembly 514 of the handle assembly 500 as was discussed above. A proximal end 1412 of a proximal closure tube segment 1410 is rotatably coupled to the closure shuttle 1420. For example, a U-shaped connector 1424 is inserted into an annular slot 1414 in the proximal end 1412 of the proximal closure tube segment 1410 and is retained within vertical slots 1422 in the closure shuttle 1420. See FIG. 7. Such an arrangement serves to attach the proximal closure tube segment 1410 to the closure shuttle 1420 for axial travel therewith while enabling the closure tube assembly 1400 to rotate relative to the closure shuttle 1420 about the shaft axis SA. A closure spring is journaled on the proximal end 1412 of the proximal closure tube segment 1410 and serves to bias the closure tube assembly 1400 in the proximal direction PD which can serve to pivot the closure trigger 512 on the handle assembly 500 (FIG. 3) into the unactuated position when the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 is operably coupled to the handle assembly 500.

[0157] As indicated above, the illustrated interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 includes an articulation joint 1200. Other interchangeable surgical tool assemblies, however, may not be capable of articulation. As can be seen in FIG. 10, upper and lower tangs 1415, 1416 protrude distally from a distal end of the proximal closure tube segment 1410 which are configured to be movably coupled to an end effector closure sleeve or distal closure tube segment 1430 of the closure tube assembly 1400. As can be seen in FIG. 10, the distal closure tube segment 1430 includes upper and lower tangs 1434, 1436 that protrude proximally from a proximal end thereof. An upper double pivot link 1220 includes proximal and distal pins that engage corresponding holes in the upper tangs 1415, 1434 of the proximal closure tube

segment 1410 and distal closure tube segment 1430, respectively. Similarly, a lower double pivot link 1222 includes proximal and distal pins that engage corresponding holes in the lower tangs 1416 and 1436 of the proximal closure tube segment 1410 and distal closure tube segment 1430, respectively. As will be discussed in further detail below, distal and proximal axial translation of the closure tube assembly 1400 will result in the closing and opening of the anvil 1 130 relative to the elongate channel 1 102.

[0158] As mentioned above, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 further includes a firing member assembly 1600 that is supported for axial travel within the spine assembly 1500. The firing member assembly 1600 includes an intermediate firing shaft portion 1602 that is configured to be attached to a distal cutting portion or knife bar 1610. The firing member assembly 1600 may also be referred to herein as a "second shaft" and/or a "second shaft assembly". As can be seen in FIGS. 7-10, the intermediate firing shaft portion 1602 may include a longitudinal slot 1604 in the distal end thereof which can be configured to receive a tab on the proximal end of the knife bar 1610. The longitudinal slot 1604 and the proximal end of the knife bar 1610 can be sized and configured to permit relative movement therebetween and can comprise a slip joint 1612. The slip joint 1612 can permit the intermediate firing shaft portion 1602 of the firing member assembly 1600 to be moved to articulate the end effector 1 100 without moving, or at least substantially moving, the knife bar 1610. Once the end effector 1 100 has been suitably oriented, the intermediate firing shaft portion 1602 can be advanced distally until a proximal sidewall of the longitudinal slot 1604 comes into contact with the tab on the knife bar 1610 to advance the knife bar 1610 and fire the staple cartridge 1 1 10 positioned within the elongate channel 1 102. As can be further seen in FIGS. 8 and 9, the elastic spine member 1520 has an elongate opening or window 1525 therein to facilitate the assembly and insertion of the intermediate firing shaft portion 1602 into the elastic spine member 1520. Once the intermediate firing shaft portion 1602 has been inserted therein, a top frame segment 1527 may be engaged with the elastic spine member 1520 to enclose the intermediate firing shaft portion 1602 and knife bar 1610 therein. Further description of the operation of the firing member assembly 1600 may be found in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,086, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541 .

[0159] Further to the above, the interchangeable tool assembly 1000 can include a clutch assembly 1620 which can be configured to selectively and releasably couple the articulation driver 1700 to the firing member assembly 1600. In one form, the clutch assembly 1620 includes a lock collar, or sleeve 1622, positioned around the firing member assembly 1600 wherein the lock sleeve 1622 can be rotated between an engaged position in which the lock

sleeve 1622 couples the articulation driver 1700 to the firing member assembly 1600 and a disengaged position in which the articulation driver 1700 is not operably coupled to the firing member assembly 1600. When the lock sleeve 1622 is in its engaged position, distal movement of the firing member assembly 1600 can move the articulation driver 1700 distally and, correspondingly, proximal movement of the firing member assembly 1600 can move the articulation driver 1700 proximally. When the lock sleeve 1622 is in its disengaged position, movement of the firing member assembly 1600 is not transmitted to the articulation driver 1700 and, as a result, the firing member assembly 1600 can move independently of the articulation driver 1700. In various circumstances, the articulation driver 1700 can be held in position by the articulation lock 1210 when the articulation driver 1700 is not being moved in the proximal or distal directions by the firing member assembly 1600.

[0160] Referring primarily to FIG. 7, the lock sleeve 1622 can comprise a cylindrical, or an at least substantially cylindrical, body including a longitudinal aperture 1624 defined therein configured to receive the firing member assembly 1600. The lock sleeve 1622 can comprise diametrically-opposed, inwardly-facing lock protrusions 1626, 1628 and an outwardly-facing lock member 1629. The lock protrusions 1626, 1628 can be configured to be selectively engaged with the intermediate firing shaft portion 1602 of the firing member assembly 1600. More particularly, when the lock sleeve 1622 is in its engaged position, the lock protrusions 1626, 1628 are positioned within a drive notch 1605 defined in the intermediate firing shaft portion 1602 such that a distal pushing force and/or a proximal pulling force can be transmitted from the firing member assembly 1600 to the lock sleeve 1622. When the lock sleeve 1622 is in its engaged position, the second lock member 1629 is received within a drive notch 1704 defined in the articulation driver 1700 such that the distal pushing force and/or the proximal pulling force applied to the lock sleeve 1622 can be transmitted to the articulation driver 1700. In effect, the firing member assembly 1600, the lock sleeve 1622, and the articulation driver 1700 will move together when the lock sleeve 1622 is in its engaged position. On the other hand, when the lock sleeve 1622 is in its disengaged position, the lock protrusions 1626, 1628 may not be positioned within the drive notch 1605 of the intermediate firing shaft portion 1602 of the firing member assembly 1600 and, as a result, a distal pushing force and/or a proximal pulling force may not be transmitted from the firing member assembly 1600 to the lock sleeve 1622.

Correspondingly, the distal pushing force and/or the proximal pulling force may not be transmitted to the articulation driver 1700. In such circumstances, the firing member assembly 1600 can be slid proximally and/or distally relative to the lock sleeve 1622 and the proximal articulation driver 1700. The clutching assembly 1620 further includes a switch drum 1630 that interfaces with the lock sleeve 1622. Further details concerning the operation of the switch drum and lock sleeve 1622 may be found in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,086, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541 , and Serial No. 15/019,196. The switch drum 1630 can further comprise at least partially circumferential openings 1632, 1634 defined therein which can receive circumferential mounts 1305 that extend from the nozzle halves 1302, 1304 and permit relative rotation, but not translation, between the switch drum 1630 and the proximal nozzle 1300. See FIG. 6. Rotation of the nozzle 1300 to a point where the mounts reach the end of their respective slots 1632, 1634 in the switch drum 1630 will result in rotation of the switch drum 1630 about the shaft axis SA. Rotation of the switch drum 1630 will ultimately result in the movement of the lock sleeve 1622 between its engaged and disengaged positions. Thus, in essence, the nozzle 1300 may be employed to operably engage and disengage the articulation drive system with the firing drive system in the various manners described in further detail in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,086, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541 , and U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,196, which have each been herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety.

[0161] In the illustrated arrangement, the switch drum 1630 includes a an L-shaped slot 1636 that extends into a distal opening 1637 in the switch drum 1630. The distal opening 1637 receives a transverse pin 1639 of a shifter plate 1638. In one example, the shifter plate 1638 is received within a longitudinal slot that is provided in the lock sleeve 1622 to facilitate the axial movement of the lock sleeve 1622 when engaged with the articulation driver 1700. Further details regarding the operation of the shifter plate and shift drum arrangements may be found in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/868,718, filed September 28, 2015, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENT WITH SHAFT RELEASE, POWERED FIRING AND POWERED ARTICULATION, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2017/0086823, the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein.

[0162] As also illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8, the interchangeable tool assembly 1000 can comprise a slip ring assembly 1640 which can be configured to conduct electrical power to and/or from the end effector 1 100, and/or communicate signals to and/or from the end effector 1 100, back to a microprocessor in the handle assembly or robotic system controller, for example. Further details concerning the slip ring assembly 1640 and associated connectors may be found in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/803,086, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263541 , and U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019, 196 which have each been herein incorporated by reference in their respective entirety as well as in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/800,067, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE TISSUE THICKNESS

SENSOR SYSTEM, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263552, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. As also described in further detail in the aforementioned patent applications that have been incorporated by reference herein, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 can also comprise at least one sensor that is configured to detect the position of the switch drum 1630.

[0163] Referring again to FIG. 7, the chassis 1800 includes one or more tapered attachment portions 1802 formed thereon that are adapted to be received within corresponding dovetail slots 507 formed within the distal end portion of the frame 506 of the handle assembly 500 as was discussed above. As can be further seen in FIG. 7, a shaft attachment lug 1605 is formed on the proximal end of the intermediate firing shaft 1602. As will be discussed in further detail below, the shaft attachment lug 1605 is received in a firing shaft attachment cradle 542 that is formed in the distal end of the longitudinal drive member 540 when the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 is coupled to the handle assembly 500. See FIG. 3.

[0164] Various interchangeable surgical tool assemblies employ a latch system 1810 for removably coupling the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 to the frame 506 of the handle assembly 500. In at least one form, as can be seen in FIG. 7, the latch system 1810 includes a lock member or lock yoke 1812 that is movably coupled to the chassis 1800. The lock yoke 1812 has a U-shape with two spaced downwardly extending legs 1814. The legs 1814 each have a pivot lug formed thereon that are adapted to be received in corresponding holes 1816 formed in the chassis 1800. Such an arrangement facilitates the pivotal attachment of the lock yoke 1812 to the chassis 1800. The lock yoke 1812 may include two proximally protruding lock lugs 1818 that are configured for releasable engagement with corresponding lock detents or grooves 509 in the distal end of the frame 506 of the handle assembly 500. See FIG. 3. In various forms, the lock yoke 1812 is biased in the proximal direction by a spring or biasing member 1819. Actuation of the lock yoke 1812 may be accomplished by a latch button 1820 that is slidably mounted on a latch actuator assembly 1822 that is mounted to the chassis 1800. The latch button 1820 may be biased in a proximal direction relative to the lock yoke 1812. The lock yoke 1812 may be moved to an unlocked position by biasing the latch button 1820 the in distal direction which also causes the lock yoke 1812 to pivot out of retaining engagement with the distal end of the frame 506. When the lock yoke 1812 is in retaining engagement with the distal end of the frame 506, the lock lugs 1818 are retainingly seated within the corresponding lock detents or grooves 509 in the distal end of the frame 506.

[0165] In the illustrated arrangement, the lock yoke 1812 includes at least one and preferably two lock hooks 1824 that are adapted to contact corresponding lock lug portions 1426 that are formed on the closure shuttle 1420. When the closure shuttle 1420 is in an unactuated position, the lock yoke 1812 may be pivoted in a distal direction to unlock the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 from the handle assembly 500. When in that position, the lock hooks 1824 do not contact the lock lug portions 1426 on the closure shuttle 1420. However, when the closure shuttle 1420 is moved to an actuated position, the lock yoke 1812 is prevented from being pivoted to an unlocked position. Stated another way, if the clinician were to attempt to pivot the lock yoke 1812 to an unlocked position or, for example, the lock yoke 1812 was in advertently bumped or contacted in a manner that might otherwise cause it to pivot distally, the lock hooks 1824 on the lock yoke 1812 will contact the lock lugs 1426 on the closure shuttle 1420 and prevent movement of the lock yoke 1812 to an unlocked position.

[0166] Still referring to FIG. 10, the knife bar 1610 may comprise a laminated beam structure that includes at least two beam layers. Such beam layers may comprise, for example, stainless steel bands that are interconnected by, for example, welds and/or pins at their proximal ends and/or at other locations along the length of the bands. In alternative embodiments, the distal ends of the bands are not connected together to allow the laminates or bands to splay relative to each other when the end effector is articulated. Such an arrangement permits the knife bar 1610 to be sufficiently flexible to accommodate articulation of the end effector. Various laminated knife bar arrangements are disclosed in U.S. Patent Application Serial No.

15/019,245. As can also be seen in FIG. 10, a middle support member 1614 is employed to provide lateral support to the knife bar 1610 as it flexes to accommodate articulation of the surgical end effector 1 100. Further details concerning the middle support member and alternative knife bar support arrangements are disclosed in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 15/019,245. As can also be seen in FIG. 10, a firing member or knife member 1620 is attached to the distal end of the knife bar 1610.

[0167] FIG. 1 1 illustrates one form of a firing member 1660 that may be employed with the interchangeable tool assembly 1000. The firing member 1660 comprises a body portion 1662 that includes a proximally extending connector member 1663 that is configured to be received in a correspondingly shaped connector opening 1614 in the distal end of the knife bar 1610. See FIG. 10. The connector 1663 may be retained within the connector opening 1614 by friction, welding, and/or a suitable adhesive, for example. Referring to FIGS. 15-17, the body portion 1662 protrudes through an elongate slot 1 104 in the elongate channel 1 102 and terminates in a foot member 1664 that extends laterally on each side of the body portion 1662. As the firing member 1660 is driven distally through the surgical staple cartridge 1 1 10, the foot member 1664 rides within a passage in the elongate channel 1 102 that is located under the surgical staple cartridge 1 1 10. As can be seen in FIG. 1 1 , the firing member 1660 may further include laterally protruding central tabs, pins, or retainer features 1680. As the firing member 1660 is driven distally through the surgical staple cartridge 1 1 10, the central retainer features 1680 ride on the inner surface 1 106 of the elongate channel 1 102. The body portion 1662 of the firing member 1660 further includes a tissue cutting edge or feature 1666 that is disposed between a distally protruding shoulder 1665 and a distally protruding top nose portion 1670. As can be further seen in FIG. 1 1 , the firing member 1660 may further include two laterally extending top tabs, pins or anvil engagement features 1665. See FIGS. 13 and 14. As the firing member 1660 is driven distally, a top portion of the body 1662 extends through a centrally disposed anvil slot 1 138 (FIG. 14) and the top anvil engagement features 1672 ride on corresponding ledges 1 136 formed on each side of the anvil slot 1 134.

[0168] Returning to FIG. 10, the firing member 1660 is configured to operably interface with a sled 1 120 that is supported within the body 1 1 1 1 of the surgical staple cartridge 1 1 10. The sled 1 120 is slidably displaceable within the surgical staple cartridge body 1 1 1 1 from a proximal starting position adjacent the proximal end 1 1 12 of the cartridge body 1 1 1 1 to an ending position adjacent a distal end 1 1 13 of the cartridge body 1 1 1 1 . The cartridge body 1 1 1 1 operably supports therein a plurality of staple drivers (not shown in FIG. 10) that are aligned in rows on each side of a centrally disposed slot 1 1 14. The centrally disposed slot 1 1 14 enables the firing member 1660 to pass therethrough and cut the tissue that is clamped between the anvil 1 130 and the staple cartridge 1 1 10. The drivers are associated with corresponding pockets 1 1 15 that open through the upper deck surface of the cartridge body. Each of the staple drivers supports one or more surgical staples or fasteners thereon. The sled 1 120 includes a plurality of sloped or wedge-shaped cams 1 122 wherein each cam 1 122 corresponds to a particular line of fasteners or drivers located on a side of the slot 1 1 14. In the illustrated example, one cam 1 122 is aligned with one line of "double" drivers that each support two staples or fasteners thereon and another cam 1 122 is aligned with another line of "single" drivers on the same side of the slot 1 1 14 that each support a single surgical staple or fastener thereon. Thus, in the illustrated example, when the surgical staple cartridge 1 1 10 is "fired", there will be three lines of staples on each lateral side of the tissue cut line. However, other cartridge and driver configurations could also be employed to fire other staple/fastener arrangements. The sled 1 120 has a central body portion 1 124 that is configured to be engaged by the shoulder 1665 of the firing member 1660. When the firing member 1660 is fired or driven distally, the firing member 1660 drives the sled 1 120 distally as well. As the firing member 1660 moves distally through the cartridge 1 1 10, the tissue cutting feature 1666 cuts the tissue that is clamped between the anvil assembly 1 130 and the cartridge 1 1 10 and, also, the sled 1 120 drives the drivers upwardly in the cartridge which drive the corresponding staples or fasteners into forming contact with the anvil assembly 1 130.

[0169] In embodiments where the firing member includes a tissue cutting surface, it may be desirable for the elongate shaft assembly to be configured in such a way so as to prevent the inadvertent advancement of the firing member unless an unspent staple cartridge is properly supported in the elongate channel 1 102 of the surgical end effector 1 100. If, for example, no staple cartridge is present at all and the firing member is distally advanced through the end effector, the tissue would be severed, but not stapled. Similarly, if a spent staple cartridge (i.e., a staple cartridge wherein at least some of the staples have already been fired therefrom) is present in the end effector and the firing member is advanced, the tissue would be severed, but may not be completely stapled, if at all. It will be appreciated that such occurrences could lead to undesirable results during the surgical procedure. U.S. Patent No. 6,988,649 entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENT HAVING A SPENT CARTRIDGE LOCKOUT, U.S. Patent No. 7,044,352 entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENT HAVING A SINGLE LOCKOUT MECHANISM FOR PREVENTION OF FIRING, and U.S. Patent No. 7,380,695 entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENT HAVING A SINGLE LOCKOUT MECHANISM FOR PREVENTION OF FIRING, and U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 14/742,933, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENTS WITH LOCKOUT ARRANGEMENTS FOR PREVENTING FIRING SYSTEM ACTUATION WHEN A CARTRIDGE IS SPENT OR MISSING

each disclose various firing member lockout arrangements. Each of those references is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety herein.

[0170] An "unfired", "unspent", "fresh" or "new" fastener cartridge 1 1 10 means that the fastener cartridge 1 1 10 has all of its fasteners in their "ready-to-be-fired positions". The new cartridge 1 1 10 is seated within the elongate channel 1 102 and may be retained therein by snap features on the cartridge body that are configured to retainingly engage corresponding portions of the elongate channel 1 102. FIGS. 15 and 18 illustrate a portion of the surgical end effector 1 100 with a new or unfired surgical staple cartridge 1 1 10 seated therein. As can be seen in FIGS. 15 and 18, the sled 1 120 is in its starting position. To prevent the firing system from being activated and, more precisely, to prevent the firing member 1660 from being distally driven through the end effector 1 1 10 unless an unfired or new surgical staple cartridge has been properly seated within the elongate channel 1 102, the interchangeable surgical tool assembly 1000 employs a firing member lockout system generally designated as 1650.

[0171] Referring now to FIGS. 10 and 15-19, the firing member lockout system 1650 includes a movable lock member 1652 that is configured to retainingly engage the firing member 1660 when a new surgical staple cartridge 1 1 10 is not seated properly within the elongate channel 1 102. More specifically, the lock member 1652 comprises at least one laterally moving locking portion 1654 that is configured to retainingly engage a corresponding portion of the firing member 1660 when the sled 1 120 is not present within the cartridge 1 1 10 in its starting position. In fact, the lock member 1652 employs two laterally moving locking portions 1654 which each engage a laterally extending portion of the firing member 1660. Other lockout arrangements can be used.

[0172] The lock member 1652 comprises a generally U-shaped spring member where each laterally movable leg or locking portion 1654 extends from a central spring portion 1653 and is configured to move in lateral directions represented by "L" in FIGS. 18 and 19. It will be appreciated that the term "lateral directions" refers to directions that are transverse to the shaft axis SA (FIG. 2). The spring or lock member 1652 may be fabricated from high strength spring steel and/or a similar material, for example. The central spring portion 1653 is seated within a slot 1236 in the end effector mounting assembly 1230. See FIG. 10. As can be seen in FIGS. 15-17, each of the laterally movable legs or locking portions 1654 has a distal end 1656 with a locking window 1658 therein. When the locking member 1652 is in a locked position, the central retainer feature 1680 on each lateral side of the firing member 1660 extends into corresponding locking windows 1658 defined in the locking portions 1654 to retainingly prevent the firing member from being distally, or axially, advanced.

[0173] Operation of the firing member lock out system will be explained with reference to FIGS. 15-19. FIGS. 15 and 18 illustrate a portion of the surgical end effector 1 100 with a new unfired cartridge 1 1 10 properly installed therein. As can be seen in FIGS. 15 and 18, the sled 1 120 includes an unlocking feature 1 126 that corresponds to each of the laterally movable locking portions 1654. An unlocking feature 1 126 is provided on or extends proximally from each of the central wedge-shaped cams 1 122. In alternative arrangements, the unlocking feature 1 126 may comprise a proximally protruding portion of the corresponding wedge-shaped cam 1 122. As can be seen in FIG. 18, the unlocking features 1 124 engage and bias the corresponding locking portions 1654 laterally in a direction that is transverse to the shaft axis SA (FIG. 2) when the sled 1 120 is in its starting position. When the locking portions 1654 are in such unlocked orientations, the central retainer features 1680 are not in retaining engagement with the locking windows 1658. In such instances, the firing member 1660 may be distally, or axially, advanced (fired). However, when a cartridge is not present in the elongate channel

1 102 or the sled 1 120 has been moved out of its starting position (meaning the cartridge is partially or completely fired), the locking portions 1654 spring laterally into retaining engagement with the firing member 1660. In such instances, referring to FIG. 19, the firing member 1660 cannot be moved distally.

[0174] FIGS. 16 and 17 illustrate the retraction of the firing member 1660 back to its starting, or unfired, position after performing a staple firing stroke as discussed above. FIG. 16 depicts the initial reengagement of the retaining features 1680 into their corresponding locking windows 1658. FIG. 17 illustrates the retaining feature in its locked position when the firing member 1660 has been fully retracted back to its starting position. To assist in the lateral displacement of the locking portions 1654 when they are contacted by the proximally moving retaining features 1680, each of the retaining features 1680 may be provided with a proximally-facing, laterally-tapered end portion. Such a lockout system prevents the actuation of the firing member 1660 when a new unfired cartridge is not present or when a new unfired cartridge is present, but has not been properly seated in the elongate channel 1 102. In addition, the lockout system may prevent the clinician from distally advancing the firing member in the case where a spent or partially fired cartridge has been inadvertently properly seated within the elongate channel. Another advantage that may be provided by the lockout system 1650 is that, unlike other firing member lock out arrangements that require movement of the firing member into and out of alignment with the corresponding slots/passages in the staple cartridge, the firing member 1660 remains in alignment with the cartridge passages while in the locked and unlocked positions. The locking portions 1654 are designed to move laterally into and out of engagement with corresponding sides of the firing member. Such lateral movement of the locking portions or portion is distinguishable from other locking arrangements that move in vertical directions to engage and disengage portions of the firing member.

[0175] Returning to FIGS. 13 and 14, the anvil 1 130 includes an elongate anvil body portion 1 132 and a proximal anvil mounting portion 1 150. The elongate anvil body portion 1 132 includes an outer surface 1 134 that defines two downwardly extending tissue stop members 1 136 that are adjacent to the proximal anvil mounting portion 1 150. The elongate anvil body portion 1 132 also includes an underside 1 135 that defines an elongate anvil slot 1 138. In the illustrated arrangement shown in FIG. 14, the anvil slot 1 138 is centrally disposed in the underside 1 135. The underside 1 135 includes three rows 1 140, 1 141 , 1 142 of staple forming pockets 1 143, 1 144 and 1 145 located on each side of the anvil slot 1 138. Adjacent each side of the anvil slot 1 138 are two elongate anvil passages 1 146. Each passage 1 146 has a proximal ramp portion 1 148. See FIG. 13. As the firing member 1660 is advanced distally, the top anvil engagement features 1632 initially enter the corresponding proximal ramp portions 1 148 and into the corresponding elongate anvil passages 1 146.

[0176] Turning to FIGS. 12 and 13, the anvil slot 1 138, as well as the proximal ramp portion 1 148, extend into the anvil mounting portion 1 150. Stated another way, the anvil slot 1 138 divides or bifurcates the anvil mounting portion 1 150 into two anvil attachment flanges 1 151 . The anvil attachments flanges 1 151 are coupled together at their proximal ends by a connection bridge 1 153. The connection bridge 1 153 supports the anvil attachment flanges 1 151 and can serve to make the anvil mounting portion 1 150 more rigid than the mounting portions of other anvil arrangements which are not connected at their proximal ends. As can also be seen in FIGS. 12 and 14, the anvil slot 1 138 has a wide portion 1 139 to accommodate the top portion including the top anvil engagement features 1632, of the firing member 1660 when the firing member 1660 is in its proximal unfired position.

[0177] As can be seen in FIGS. 13 and 20-24, each of the anvil attachment flanges 1 151 includes a transverse mounting hole 1 156 that is configured to receive a pivot pin 1 158 (FIGS. 10 and 20) therethrough. The anvil mounting portion 1 150 is pivotally pinned to the proximal end 1 103 of the elongate channel 1 102 by the pivot pin 1 158 which extends through mounting holes 1 107 in the proximal end 1 103 of the elongate channel 1 102 and the mounting hole 1 156 in anvil mounting portion 1 150. Such an arrangement pivotally affixes the anvil 1 130 to the elongate channel 1 102 s that the anvil 1 130 can be pivoted about a fixed anvil axis A-A which is transverse to the shaft axis SA. See FIG. 5. The anvil mounting portion 1 150 also includes a cam surface 1 152 that extends from a centralized firing member parking area 1 154 to the outer surface 1 134 of the anvil body portion 1 132.

[0178] Further to the above, the anvil 1 130 is movable between an open position and closed positions by axially advancing and retracting the distal closure tube segment 1430, as discussed further below. A distal end portion of the distal closure tube segment 1430 has an internal cam surface formed thereon that is configured to engage the cam surface 1552, or cam surfaces formed on the anvil mounting portion 1 150, and move the anvil 1 130. FIG. 22 illustrates a cam surface 1 152a formed on the anvil mounting portion 1 150 so as to establish a single contact path 1 155a with the internal cam surface 1444, for example, on the distal closure tube segment 1430. FIG. 23 illustrates a cam surface 1 152b that is configured relative to the internal cam surface 1444 on the distal closure tube segment to establish two separate and distinct arcuate contact paths 1 155b between the cam surface 1 152 on the anvil mounting portion 1 150 and internal cam surface 1444 on the distal closure tube segment 1430. In addition to other potential advantages discussed herein, such an arrangement may better distribute the closure forces from the distal closure tube segment 1430 to the anvil 1 130. FIG. 24 illustrates a cam surface 1 152c that is configured relative to the internal cam surface 1444 of the distal closure tube segment 1430 to establish three distinct zones of contact 1 155c and 1 155d between the cam surfaces on the anvil mounting portion 1 150 and the distal closure tube segment 1430. The zones 1 155c, 1 155d establish larger areas of camming contact between the cam surface or cam surfaces on the distal closure tube segment 1430 and the anvil mounting portion 1 150 and may better distribute the closure forces to the anvil 1 130.

[0179] As the distal closure tube segment 1430 cammingly engages the anvil mounting portion 1 150 of the anvil 1 130, the anvil 1 130 is pivoted about the anvil axis AA (FIG. 5) which results in the pivotal movement of the distal end of the end 1 133 of elongate anvil body portion 1 132 toward the surgical staple cartridge 1 1 10 and the distal end 1 105 of the elongate channel 1 102. As the anvil body portion 1 132 begins to pivot, it contacts the tissue that is to be cut and stapled which is now positioned between the underside 1 135 of the elongate anvil body portion 1 132 and the deck 1 1 16 of the surgical staple cartridge 1 1 10. As the anvil body portion 1 132 is compressed onto the tissue, the anvil 1 130 may experience considerable amounts of resistive forces and/or bending loads, for example. These resistive forces are overcome as the distal closure tube 1430 continues its distal advancement. However, depending upon their magnitudes and points of application to the anvil body portion 1 132, these resistive forces could tend to cause portions of the anvil 1 130 to flex away from the staple cartridge 1 1 10 which may generally be undesirable. For example, such flexure may cause misalignment between the firing member 1660 and the passages 1 148, 1 146 within the anvil 1 130. In instances wherein the flexure is excessive, such flexure could significantly increase the amount of firing force required to fire the instrument (i.e., drive the firing member 1660 through the tissue from its starting to ending position). Such excessive firing force may result in damage to the end effector, the firing member, the knife bar, and/or the firing drive system components, for example. Thus, it may be advantageous for the anvil to be constructed so as to resist such flexure.

[0180] FIGS. 25-27 illustrate an anvil 1 130' that includes features that improve the stiffness of the anvil body and its resistance to flexure forces that may be generated during the closing and/or firing processes. The anvil 1 130' may otherwise be identical in construction to the anvil 1 130 described above except for the differences discussed herein. As can be seen in FIGS. 25-27, the anvil 1 130' has an elongate anvil body 1 132' that has an upper body portion 1 165 that and anvil cap 1 170 attached thereto. The anvil cap 1 170 is roughly rectangular in shape and has an outer cap perimeter 1 172, although the anvil cap 1 170 can have any suitable shape.

The perimeter 1 172 of the anvil cap 1 170 is configured to be inserted into a correspondingly-shaped opening 1 137 formed in the upper body portion 1 165 and positioned against axially extending internal ledge portions 1 139 formed therein. See FIG. 27. The internal ledge portions 1 139 are configured to support the corresponding long sides 1 177 of the anvil cap 1 170. In an alternative embodiment, the anvil cap 1 170 may be slid onto the internal ledges 1 139 through an opening in the distal end 1 133 of the anvil body 1 132'. In yet another embodiment, no internal ledge portions are provided. The anvil body 1 132' and the anvil cap 1 170 may be fabricated from suitable metal that is conducive to welding. A first weld 1 178 may extend around the entire cap perimeter 1 172 of the anvil cap 1 170 or it may only be located along the long sides 1 177 of the anvil cap 1 170 and not the distal end 1 173 and/or proximal end 1 175 thereof. The first weld 1 178 may be continuous or it may be discontinuous or intermittent. In those embodiments where the first weld 1 178 is discontinuous or intermittent, the weld segments may be equally distributed along the long sides 1 177 of the anvil cap 1 170, more densely spaced closer to the distal ends of the long sides 1 177, and/or more densely spaced closer to the proximal ends of the long sides 1 177. In certain arrangements, the weld segments may be more densely spaced in the center areas of the long sides 1 177 of the anvil cap 1 170.

[0181] FIGS. 28-30 illustrate an anvil cap 1 170' that is configured to be mechanically interlocked to the anvil body 1 132' as well as welded to the upper body portion 1 165. In this embodiment, a plurality of retention formations 1 182 are defined in the wall 1 180 of the upper body portion 1 165 that defines opening 1 137. As used in this context, the term "mechanically interlocked" means that the anvil cap will remain affixed to the elongate anvil body regardless of the orientation of the elongate anvil body and without any additional retaining or fastening such as welding and/or adhesive, for example. The retention formations 1 182 may protrude inwardly into the opening 1 137 from the opening wall 1 180, although any suitable arrangement can be used. The retention formations 1 182 may be integrally formed into the wall 1 180 or otherwise be attached thereto. The retention formations 1 182 are designed to frictionally engage a corresponding portion of the anvil cap 1 170' when the anvil cap 1 170' is installed in the opening 1 137 to frictionally retain the anvil cap 1 170' therein. The retention formations 1 182 protrude inwardly into the opening 1 137 and are configured to be frictionally received within a

correspondingly shaped engagement area 1 184 formed in the outer perimeter 1 172' of the anvil cap 1 170'. The retention formations 1 182 only correspond to the long sides 1 177' of the anvil cap 1 170' and are not provided in the portions of the wall 1 180 that correspond to the distal end 1 173 or proximal end 1 175 of the anvil cap 1 170'. In alternative arrangements, the retention formations 1 182 may also be provided in the portions of the wall 1 180 that correspond to the distal end 1 173 and proximal end 1 175 of the anvil cap 1 170' as well as the long sides 1 177' thereof. In still other arrangements, the retention formations 1 182 may only be provided in the portions of the wall 1 180 that correspond to one or both of the distal and proximal ends 1 173, 1 175 of the anvil cap 1 170'. In still other arrangements, the retention formations 1 182 may be provided in the portions of the wall 1 180 corresponding to the long sides 1 177' and only one of the proximal and distal ends 1 173, 1 175 of the anvil cap 1 170'. It will be further understood that the retention protrusions in all of the foregoing embodiments may be alternatively formed on the anvil cap with the engagement areas being formed in the elongate anvil body.

[0182] In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 28-30, the retention formations 1 182 are equally spaced or equally distributed along the wall portions 1 180 of the anvil cap 1 170'. In alternative embodiments, the retention formations 1 182 may be more densely spaced closer to the distal ends of the long sides 1 177' or more densely spaced closer to the proximal ends of the long sides 1 177'. Stated another way, the spacing between those retention formations adjacent the distal end, the proximal end or both the distal and proximal ends may be less than the spacing of the formations located in the central portion of the anvil cap 1 170'. In still other arrangements, the retention formations 1 182 may be more densely spaced in the center areas of the long sides 1 177' of the anvil cap 1 170'. In some alternative embodiments, the correspondingly shaped engagement areas 1 184 may not be provided in the outer perimeter 1 172' or in portions of the outer perimeter 1 172' of the anvil cap 1 170'. In other embodiments, the retention formations and correspondingly-shaped engagement areas may be provided with different shapes and sizes. In alternative arrangements, the retention formations may be sized relative to the engagement areas so that there is no interference fit therebetween. In such arrangements, the anvil cap may be retained in position by welding, and/or an adhesive, for example.

[0183] In the illustrated example, a weld 1 178' extends around the entire perimeter 1 172' of the anvil cap 1 170'. Alternatively, the weld 1 178' is located along the long sides 1 177' of the anvil cap 1 170' and not the distal end 1 173 and/or proximal end 1 175 thereof. The weld 1 178' may be continuous or it may be discontinuous or intermittent. In those embodiments where the weld 1 178' is discontinuous or intermittent, the weld segments may be equally distributed along the long sides 1 177' of the anvil cap 1 170' or the weld segments may be more densely spaced closer to the distal ends of the long sides 1 177' or more densely spaced closer to the proximal ends of the long sides 1 177'. In still other arrangements, the weld segments may be more densely spaced in the center areas of the long sides 1 177' of the anvil cap 1 170'.

[0184] FIGS. 31 and 32 illustrate another anvil arrangement 1 130" that has an anvil cap 1 170" attached thereto. The anvil cap 1 170" is roughly rectangular in shape and has an outer cap perimeter 1 172"; however, the anvil cap 1 170" can comprise of any suitable configuration. The outer cap perimeter 1 172" is configured to be inserted into a correspondingly-shaped opening 1 137" in upper body portion 1 165 of the anvil body 1 132" and received on axially extending internal ledge portions 1 139" and 1 190" formed therein. See FIG. 32. The ledge portions 1 139" and 1 190" are configured to support the corresponding long sides 1 177" of the anvil cap 1 170". In an alternative embodiment, the anvil cap 1 170" is slid onto the internal ledges 1 139" and 1 190" through an opening in the distal end 1 133" of the anvil body 1 132'. The anvil body 1 132" and the anvil cap 1 170" may be fabricated from metal material that is conducive to welding. A first weld 1 178" may extend around the entire perimeter 1 172" of the anvil cap 1 170" or it may only be located along the long sides 1 177" of the anvil cap 1 170" and not the distal end 1 173" and/or proximal end thereof. The weld 1 178" may be continuous or it may be discontinuous or intermittent. It will be appreciated that the continuous weld

embodiment has more weld surface area due to the irregularly shape perimeter of the anvil cap 1 170" as compared to the embodiments with a straight perimeter sides such as the anvil caps shown in FIG. 26, for example. In those embodiments where the weld 1 178" is discontinuous or intermittent, the weld segments may be equally distributed along the long sides 1 177" of the anvil cap 1 170" or the weld segments may be more densely spaced closer to the distal ends of the long sides 1 177" or more densely spaced closer to the proximal ends of the long sides 1 177". In still other arrangements, the weld segments may be more densely spaced in the center areas of the long sides 1 177" of the anvil cap 1 170".

[0185] Still referring to FIGS. 31 and 32, the anvil cap 1 170" may be additionally welded to the anvil body 1 132" by a plurality of second discrete "deep" welds 1 192". For example, each weld 1 192" may be placed at the bottom of a corresponding hole or opening 1 194" provided through the anvil cap 1 170" so that a discrete weld 1 192" may be formed along the portion of the anvil body 1 132" between the ledges 1 190" and 1 139". See FIG. 32. The welds 1 192" may be equally distributed along the long sides 1 177" of the anvil cap 1 170" or the welds 1 192" may be more densely spaced closer to the distal ends of the long sides 1 177" or more densely spaced closer to the proximal ends of the long sides 1 177". In still other arrangements, the welds 1 192" may be more densely spaced in the center areas of the long sides 1 177" of the anvil cap 1 170".

[0186] FIG. 33 illustrates another anvil cap 1 170"' that is configured to be mechanically interlocked to the anvil body 1 132"' as well as welded to the upper body portion 1 165. In this embodiment, a tongue-and-groove arrangement is employed along each long side 1 177"' of the anvil cap 1 170"'. In particular, a laterally extending continuous or intermittent tab 1 195"' protrudes from each of the long sides 1 177"' of the anvil cap 1 170"'. Each tab 1 195" corresponds to an axial slot 1 197"' formed in the anvil body 1 132"'. The anvil cap 1 170"' is slid in from an opening in the distal end of the anvil body 1 132"' to "mechanically" affix the anvil cap to the anvil body 1 132"'. The tabs 1 195"' and slots 1 197"' may be sized relative to each other to establish a sliding frictional fit therebetween. In addition, the anvil cap 1 170"' may be welded to the anvil body 1 132"'. The anvil body 1 132"' and the anvil cap 1 170"' may be fabricated from metal that is conducive to welding. The weld 1 178"' may extend around the entire perimeter 1 172"' of the anvil cap 1 170"' or it may only be located along the long sides 1 177"' of the anvil cap 1 170"'. The weld 1 178"' may be continuous or it may be discontinuous or intermittent. In those embodiments where the weld 1 178"' is discontinuous or intermittent, the weld segments may be equally distributed along the long sides 1 177"' of the anvil cap 1 170"' or the weld segments may be more densely spaced closer to the distal ends of the long sides 1 177"' or more densely spaced closer to the proximal ends of the long sides 1 177"'. In still other arrangements, the weld segments may be more densely spaced in the center areas of the long sides 1 177"' of the anvil cap 1 170"'.

[0187] The anvil embodiments described herein with anvil caps may provide several advantages. One advantage for example, may make the anvil and firing member assembly process easier. That is, the firing member may be installed through the opening in the anvil body while the anvil is attached to the elongate channel. Another advantage is that the upper cap may improve the anvil's stiffness and resistance to the above-mentioned flexure forces that may be experienced when clamping tissue. By resisting such flexure, the frictional forces normally encountered by the firing member 1660 may be reduced. Thus, the amount of firing force required to drive the firing member from its starting to ending position in the surgical staple cartridge may also be reduced.

[0188] FIG. 34 provides a side-by-side comparison of two anvils. A portion of a first anvil 2030 of an end effector 2000 is depicted in the right half of FIG. 34 and a portion of a second anvil 2030' of an end effector 2000' is depicted in the left half of FIG. 34. The anvil 2030 comprises a first longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032a, a second longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032b, and a third longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032c. The anvil 2030 further comprises a longitudinal slot 2033 which is configured to receive a firing member, such as firing member 2040, for example, as the firing member is advanced through a staple firing stroke. The first longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032a is positioned intermediate the

longitudinal slot 2033 and the second longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032b, and the second longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032b is positioned intermediate the first longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032a and the third longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032c. As a result, the first longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032a comprises an inner row, the third longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032c comprises an outer row, and the second longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032b comprises a middle or intermediate row.

[0189] Similar to the above, the anvil 2030' comprises a first longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032a, a second longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032b, and a third longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032c. The anvil 2030' further comprises a longitudinal slot 2033' which is configured to receive a firing member, such as firing member 2040', for example, as the firing member is advanced through a staple firing stroke. The first longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032a is positioned intermediate the longitudinal slot 2033' and the second longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032b, and the second longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032b is positioned intermediate the first longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032a and the third longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032c. As a result, the first longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032a comprises an inner row, the third longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032c comprises an outer row, and the second longitudinal row of forming pockets 2032b comprises a middle or intermediate row.

[0190] The anvil 2030 comprises a flat, or an at least substantially flat, tissue engaging surface 2031 . The forming pockets 2032a, 2032b, and 2032c are defined in the flat surface 2031 . The flat surface 2031 does not have steps defined therein; however, embodiments are envisioned in which the anvil 2030 can comprise a stepped tissue engaging surface. For instance, the anvil 2030' comprises a stepped tissue engaging surface 2031 '. In this

embodiment, the forming pockets 2032a and 2032b are defined in a lower step and the forming pockets 2032c are defined in an upper step.

[0191] The firing member 2040' comprises a coupling member 2042' including a cutting portion 2041. The cutting portion 2041 is configured and arranged to incise tissue captured between the anvil 2030' and a staple cartridge 2010 (FIG. 35), for example. The firing member 2040' is configured to push a sled having inclined surfaces distally during a staple firing stroke. The inclined surfaces are configured to lift staple drivers within the staple cartridge 2010 to form staples 2020 against the anvil 2030' and eject the staples 2020 from the staple cartridge 2010. The coupling member 2042' comprises projections, or cams, 2043' extending laterally therefrom which are configured to engage the anvil 2030' during the staple firing stroke. Referring to FIG. 37, the projections 2043' are comprised of longitudinally elongate shoulders extending from the coupling member 2042'. In other embodiments, the projections 2043' comprise a cylindrical pin which extends through the coupling member 2042'. In any event, the projections 2043' have flat lateral sides, or ends, 2047'.

[0192] The longitudinal slot 2033' comprises lateral portions 2033Γ extending laterally from a central portion 2033c' which are configured to receive the projections 2043'. As illustrated in FIG. 34, the lateral portions 2033Γ of the longitudinal slot 2033' have a rectangular, or at least substantially rectangular, configuration having sharp corners. Each lateral portion 2033Γ of the slot 2033' comprises a longitudinal cam surface 2035' configured to be engaged by the projections 2043'during the staple firing stroke. Each longitudinal cam surface 2035' is defined on the upper side of a ledge 2037' which extends longitudinally along the slot 2033'. Each longitudinal ledge 2037' comprises a beam including a fixed end attached to the main body portion of the anvil 2030' and a free end configured to move relative to the fixed end. As such, each longitudinal ledge 2037' can comprise a cantilever beam.

[0193] The coupling member 2042' further comprises a foot, or cam, 2044 (FIG. 35) configured to engage the staple cartridge 2010, or a jaw supporting the staple cartridge 2010, during the staple firing stroke. Moreover, the projections 2043' and the foot 2044 co-operate to position the anvil 2030' and the staple cartridge 2010 relative to one another. When the anvil 2030' is movable relative to the staple cartridge 2010, the coupling member 2042' can cam the anvil 2030' into position relative to the staple cartridge 2010. When the staple cartridge 2010, or the jaw supporting the staple cartridge 2010, is movable relative to the anvil 2030', the coupling member 2042' can cam the staple cartridge 2010 into position relative to the anvil 2030'.

[0194] Further to the above, the firing member 2040 comprises a coupling member 2042 including a cutting portion 2041. The cutting portion 2041 is configured and arranged to incise tissue captured between the anvil 2030 and a staple cartridge 2010 (FIG. 35). The firing member 2040 is configured to push a sled having inclined surfaces distally during a staple firing stroke. The inclined surfaces are configured to lift staple drivers within the staple cartridge 2010 to form staples 2020 against the anvil 2030 and eject the staples 2020 from the staple cartridge 2010. The coupling member 2042 comprises projections, or cams, 2043 extending laterally therefrom which are configured to engage the anvil 2030 during the staple firing stroke. The projections 2043 have curved, or rounded, lateral sides, or ends, 2047. The lateral ends 2047 of the projections 2043 are entirely curved or fully-rounded. Each lateral end 2047 comprises an arcuate profile extending between a top surface of a projection 2043 and a bottom surface of the projection 2043. In other embodiments, the lateral ends 2047 of the projections 2043 are only partially curved.

[0195] The longitudinal slot 2033 comprises lateral portions 2033I extending laterally from a central portion 2033c which are configured to receive the projections 2043. Each lateral portion 2033I of the slot 2033 comprises a longitudinal cam surface 2035 configured to be engaged by the projections 2043 during the staple firing stroke. Each longitudinal cam surface 2035 is defined on the upper side of a ledge 2037 which extends longitudinally along the slot 2033. Each longitudinal ledge 2037 comprises a beam including a fixed end attached to the main body portion of the anvil 2030 and a free end configured to move relative to the fixed end. As such, each longitudinal ledge 2037 can comprise a cantilever beam. As illustrated in FIG. 34, the lateral portions of the longitudinal slot 2033 comprise a curved, or rounded, profile which match, or at least substantially match, the curved ends 2047 of the projections 2043.

[0196] The coupling member 2042 further comprises a foot, or cam, 2044 (FIG. 35) configured to engage the staple cartridge 2010, or a jaw supporting the staple cartridge 2010, during the staple firing stroke. Moreover, the projections 2043 and the foot 2044 co-operate to position the anvil 2030 and the staple cartridge 2010 relative to one another. When the anvil 2030 is movable relative to the staple cartridge 2010, the coupling member 2042 can cam the anvil 2030 into position relative to the staple cartridge 2010. When the staple cartridge 2010, or the jaw supporting the staple cartridge 2010, is movable relative to the anvil 2030, the coupling member 2042 can cam the staple cartridge 2010 into position relative to the anvil 2030.

[0197] Referring again to FIG. 34, the lateral portions 2033I' of the longitudinal slot 2033' extend a distance 2034' from a centerline CL of the anvil 2030'. The lateral portions 2033Γ extend over, or behind, the forming pockets 2032a in the anvil 2030'. As illustrated in FIG. 34, the lateral ends of the lateral portions 2033Γ are aligned with the outer edges of the forming pockets 2032a. Other embodiments are envisioned in which the lateral portions 2033Γ extend laterally beyond the forming pockets 2032a, for example. That said, referring to FIG. 36, the ledges 2037' of the anvil 2030' are long and, in certain instances, the ledges 2037' can deflect significantly under load. In some instances, the ledges 2037' can deflect downwardly such that a large portion of the drive surfaces 2045' defined on the bottom of the projections 2043' are not in contact with the cam surfaces 2035'. In such instances, the contact between the projections 2043' and the cam surfaces 2035' can be reduced to a point, such as point 2047', for example. In some instances, the contact between the projections 2043' and the cam surfaces 2035' can be reduced to a longitudinally extending line, which may appear to be a point when viewed from the distal end of the end effector, as illustrated in FIG. 36.

[0198] Moreover, referring again to FIG. 34, the projections 2043' extend over, or behind, the forming pockets 2032a in the anvil 2030'. The lateral ends of the projections 2043' extend over a longitudinal centerline 2062a of the forming pockets 2032a. Other embodiments are envisioned in which the lateral ends of the projections 2043' are aligned with the longitudinal centerline 2062a of the forming pockets 2032a. Certain embodiments are envisioned in which the lateral ends of the projections 2043' do not extend to the longitudinal centerline 2062a of the forming pockets 2032a. In any event, referring again to FIG. 36, the projections 2043' can deflect upwardly, especially when the projections 2043' are long, such that a large portion of the drive surfaces 2045' of the projections 2043' are not in contact with the cam surfaces 2035'. This condition can further exacerbate the condition discussed above in connection with the ledges 2037'. That being said, the projections 2043' may be able to better control the staple formation process occurring in the forming pockets 2032a, and/or the forming pockets 2032b and 2032c, when the projections 2043' extend to the outer edge of the forming pockets 2032a or beyond, for instance.

[0199] Further to the above, the ledges 2037' and the projections 2043' can deflect in a manner which causes the load flowing between the firing member 2040' and the anvil 2030' to be applied at the inner ends of ledges 2037'. As illustrated in FIG. 36, the contact points 2048' are at or near the inner ends of the ledges 2037'. The deflection of the ledges 2037', and the projections 2043', is the same or similar to that of cantilever beams. As the reader should appreciate, the deflection of a cantilever beam is proportional to the cube of the beam length when the load is applied at the end of the cantilever beam. In any event, gaps between the ledges 2037' and the projections 2043' can be created when the ledges 2037' and/or the projections 2043' deflect. Such gaps between portions of the ledges 2037' and the projections 2043' means that the forces flowing therebetween will flow through very small areas which will, as a result, increase the stress and strain experienced by the ledges 2037' and projections 2043'. This interaction is represented by stress risers, or concentrations, 2039' and 2049' in FIGS. 38 and 39 where stress risers 2039' are present in the ledges 2037' and stress risers 2049' are present at the interconnection between the projections 2043' and the coupling member 2042'. Other stress risers, or concentrations, may be present but, as discussed below, it is desirable to reduce or eliminate such stress risers.

[0200] Referring again to FIGS. 34 and 35, the lateral portions 2033I of the longitudinal slot 2033 each extend a distance 2034 from a centerline CL of the anvil 2030. The distance 2034 is shorter than the distance 2034'. Nonetheless, the lateral portions 2033I extend over, or behind, the forming pockets 2032a in the anvil 2030. As illustrated in FIG. 34, the lateral ends of the lateral portions 2033I are not aligned with the outer edges of the forming pockets 2032a.

Moreover, the lateral ends of the lateral portions 2033I do not extend beyond the outer edges of the forming pockets 2032a; however, the lateral portions 20331 extend over the longitudinal centerlines 2062a of the forming pockets 2032a. Further to the above, the ledges 2037 are shorter than the ledges 2037'. As such, the ledges 2037 will experience less deflection, stress, and strain than the ledges 2037' for a given force applied thereto.

[0201] Other embodiments are envisioned in which the lateral portions 2033I of the slot 2033 do not extend to the longitudinal centerline 2062a of the forming pockets 2032a. In certain embodiments, the lateral portions 2033I do not extend laterally over or overlap the forming pockets 2032a. Such shorter lateral portions 2033I, further to the above, can reduce the deflection, stress, and strain in the ledges 2037. Owing to the reduced deflection of the ledges 2037, the drive surfaces 2045 defined on the bottom of the projections 2043 can remain in contact with the cam surfaces 2035 of the ledges 2037. In such instances, the contact area between the projections 2043 and the cam surfaces 2035 can be increased as compared to the contact area between the projections 2043' and the cam surfaces 2035'.

[0202] Further to the above, the cross-sectional thickness of the ledges 2037 isn't constant, unlike the ledges 2037' which have a constant cross-sectional thickness. The ledges 2037 have a tapered cross-sectional thickness where the base of each ledge 2037 is wider than its inner end owing to the rounded lateral ends of the lateral slot portions 2033I. Such a configuration can serve to stiffen or strengthen the ledges 2037 and reduce the deflection, stress, and strain of the ledges 2037 as compared to the ledges 2037'. In at least one instance, a portion of a ledge 2037 is tapered while another portion of the ledge 2037 has a constant cross-sectional thickness. In at least one other instance, the entirety of a ledge 2037 can be tapered such that none of the cross-sectional thickness is constant.

[0203] Moreover, referring again to FIGS. 34 and 35, the projections 2043 extend over, or behind, the forming pockets 2032a in the anvil 2030. The lateral ends of the projections 2043 do not extend over the longitudinal centerline 2062a of the forming pockets 2032a. Other embodiments are envisioned in which the lateral ends of the projections 2043 are aligned with the longitudinal centerline 2062a of the forming pockets 2032a. Certain embodiments are envisioned in which the lateral ends of the projections 2043 do not extend over the forming pockets 2032a at all. In any event, the upward deflection of the projections 2043 may be less than the projections 2043' and, as a result, a larger contact area can be present between the drive surfaces 2045 and the cam surfaces 2035.

[0204] Further to the above, the ledges 2037 and the projections 2043 can deflect in a manner which causes the load flowing between the firing member 2040 and the anvil 2030 to be applied laterally along the lengths of the ledges 2037 instead of at a single point and/or at end of the ledges 2037. As a result, the forces flowing therebetween will flow through larger areas which will, as a result, reduce the stress and strain experienced by the ledges 2037 and projections 2043 which can reduce or eliminate the stress risers discussed above in connection with the ledges 2037' and the projections 2043', for example.

[0205] Referring again to FIG. 35, the foot 2044 of the coupling member 2042 is wider than the projections 2033. Stated another way, the lateral width of the foot 2044 is wider than the width between the lateral ends of the projections 2033. In such instances, the foot 2044 can deflect or strain more than the projections and, as a result, the deflection of the projections 2033 can be reduced. Alternative embodiments are envisioned in which the lateral width of the foot 2044 is the same as or less than the width between the lateral ends of the projections 2033; however, such embodiments can be otherwise configured to provide the desired deflection and/or strain within the projections 2033.

[0206] As discussed above, an end effector can comprise an anvil, for example, which is movable between an open position and a closed position. In some instances, the anvil is moved toward its closed position by a firing member, such as firing member 2040 or 2040', for example, when the firing member is moved distally. In other instances, the anvil is moved toward its closed position prior to the firing member being advanced distally to perform a staple firing stroke. In either event, the anvil may not move into its entirely closed position until the firing member approaches or reaches the end of its staple firing stroke. As a result, the anvil is progressively closed by the firing member. In at least one such instance, the anvil may progressively close owing to thick tissue captured between the anvil and the staple cartridge. In some instances, the anvil may actually deflect or deform during the staple firing stroke of the firing member. Such circumstances are generally controlled, however, by the upper projections and the bottom foot of the firing member.

[0207] Turning now to FIG. 37, the drive surfaces 2045' defined on the projections 2043' are flat, or at least substantially flat. Moreover, the drive surfaces 2045' are configured to flushingly engage the flat, or at least substantially flat, cam surfaces 2035' defined on the anvil 2030' when the anvil 2030' is in a completely closed position. Stated another way, the drive surfaces 2045' engage the cam surfaces 2035' in a face-to-face relationship when the anvil 2030' is in a completely flat orientation. A flat orientation of the anvil 2030' is depicted in phantom in FIG. 37. In such instances, the drive surfaces 2045' are parallel, or at least substantially parallel, to the longitudinal path of the firing member 2040' during the staple firing stroke. As discussed above, however, the anvil 2030' may progressively close during the firing stroke and, as a result, the anvil 2030' may not always be in an entirely closed position. As a result, the drive surfaces

2045' may not always be aligned with the cam surfaces 2035' and, in such instances, the projections 2043' may gouge into the ledges 2037' of the anvil 2030. FIG. 37 depicts such instances with solid lines.

[0208] Further to the above, the drive surfaces 2045' of the projections 2043' and/or the cam surfaces 2035' defined on the ledges 2037' can plastically deform if the firing member 2040' has to progressively close the anvil 2030' into its entirely closed position. In certain instances, the cam surfaces 2035' can gall, for example, which can increase the force needed to complete the staple firing stroke. More specifically, plastic strain of the projections 2043' and/or the anvil ledges 2037' can cause energy losses as the metal is deformed beyond the plastic limits. At that point, galling occurs and the frictional co-efficient of the coupling increases substantially. The energy losses can be in the order of about 10%-30%, for example, which can increase the force needed to fire the firing member in the order of about 10%-30%. Moreover, the force needed to complete subsequent staple firing strokes with the end effector 2000' may increase in such instances in the event that the end effector 2000' is reused.

[0209] Turning now to FIGS. 40-42, a firing member 2140 comprises a firing bar and a coupling member 2142 attached to the firing bar. The coupling member 2142 comprises a connector 2148 which connects the coupling member 2142 to the firing bar. The coupling member 2142 further comprises a cutting member 2041 configured to incise the tissue of a patient during a staple firing stroke. The coupling member 2142 also comprises projections 2143 configured to engage an anvil, such as anvil 2030 or 2030', for example, and, in addition, a foot 2144 configured to engage a staple cartridge jaw during the staple firing stroke. Each projection 2143 comprises a drive surface 2145 defined on the bottom side thereof. Each projection 2143 further comprises a proximally-extending cam transition 2147 and a radiused-transition 2149 extending around the perimeter of the projection 2143. The coupling member 2142 further comprises intermediate projections 2146 extending laterally therefrom which are configured to prevent the firing member 2140 from performing the staple firing stroke when an unspent staple cartridge is not positioned in front of the firing member 2140 at the outset of the staple firing stroke.

[0210] Further to the above, the drive surfaces 2145 of the projections 2143 are not parallel to the longitudinal path 2160 of the firing member 2140. Rather, the drive surfaces 2145 extend transversely to the longitudinal path 2160. In at least one instance, the distal end of each drive surface 2145 is positioned further away from the longitudinal path 2160 than the proximal end. Such an arrangement can reduce or eliminate the problems described above in connection with the progressive closure of the anvil 2130. More specifically, in at least one instance, if the anvil 2130 will move through a range of motion between about 4 degrees and about 0 degrees with respect to the longitudinal path 2160 during the progressive closure, then the drive surface 2145 could be oriented at about 2 degrees with respect to the longitudinal path 2160, for example, which represents the midpoint in the range of progressive closure. Other embodiments are possible. For instance, if the anvil 2130 will move through a range of motion between about 1 degree and about 0 degrees with respect to the longitudinal path 2160 during the progressive closure, then the drive surfaces 2145 could be oriented at about 1 degree with respect to the longitudinal path 2160, for example, which represents the upper bound in the range of progressive closure. In various instances, the firing member 2140 may be required to progressively close the anvil 2130 through a 5 degree range of motion, for example. In other instances, the firing member 2140 may be required to progressively the anvil 2130 through a 10 degree range of motion, for example. In some instances, the anvil 2130 may not reach its completely closed position and, as a result, the progressive closure of the anvil 2130 may not reach 0 degrees.

[0211] Further to the above, the drive surface 2145 of the projection 2143 is not parallel to the drive surface of the foot 2144. Referring primarily to FIG. 41 , the drive surface 2145 extends along an axis 2183 and the drive surface of the foot 2144 extends along an axis 2184. In at least one instance, the drive surface 2145 is oriented at an about 0.5 degree angle with respect to the drive surface of the foot 2144, for example. Other instances are envisioned in which the drive surface 2145 is oriented at an about 1 degree angle with respect to the drive surface of the foot 2144, for example. Certain instances are envisioned in which the drive surface 2145 is oriented between about 0.5 degrees and about 5 degrees with respect to the drive surface of the foot 2144, for example. The drive surface of the foot 2144 is parallel to the longitudinal path 2160; however, other embodiments are envisioned in which the drive surface of the foot 2144 is not parallel to the longitudinal path 2160.

[0212] The examples provided above were discussed in connection with a movable anvil; however, it should be understood that the teachings of such examples could be adapted to any suitable movable jaw, such as a movable staple cartridge jaw, for example. Similarly, the examples provided elsewhere in this application could be adapted to any movable jaw.

[0213] Turning now to FIGS. 43-45, a firing member 2240 comprises a firing bar and a coupling member 2242 attached to the firing bar. The coupling member 2242 comprises a connector 2148 which connects the coupling member 2242 to the firing bar. The coupling member 2242 further comprises a cutting member 2041 configured to incise the tissue of a patient during a staple firing stroke. The coupling member 2242 also comprises projections

2243 configured to engage an anvil, such as anvil 2030 or 2030', for example, and, in addition, a foot 2144 configured to engage a staple cartridge jaw during the staple firing stroke. Each projection 2243 comprises a drive surface 2245 defined on the bottom side thereof. Each projection 2243 further comprises a radiused-transition 2249 extending around the perimeter thereof. The coupling member 2242 further comprises intermediate projections 2146 extending laterally therefrom which are configured to prevent the firing member 2240 from performing the staple firing stroke when an unspent staple cartridge is not positioned in front of the firing member 2240 at the outset of the staple firing stroke.

[0214] Further to the above, each projection 2243 comprises a leading, or proximal, end 2251 configured to engage the anvil and, in addition, a trailing end. The leading end of each projection 2243 is different than the lagging, or trailing, end of the projection 2243. The leading end 2251 comprises a radius which extends from the bottom drive surface 2245 of the projection 2243 to a location positioned above a longitudinal centerline 2250 of the projection 2243. The leading end 2251 comprises a single radius of curvature; however, the leading end 2251 can be comprised of more than one radius of curvature. Each projection 2243 further comprises a radiused edge 2259 between the radiused leading end 2251 and the top surface of the projection 2243. The radius of curvature of the edge 2259 is smaller than the radius of curvature of the leading end 2251 . Other embodiments are envisioned in which the entirety of, or at least a portion of, the leading end 2251 is linear. In any event, the configuration of the leading end 2251 can shift the force, or load, transmitted between the firing member 2240 and the anvil away from the leading end 2251 toward the trailing end of the projection 2243. Stated another way, the configuration of the leading end 2251 may prevent the leading end 2251 from becoming the focal point of the transmitted force between the firing member 2240 and the anvil. Such an arrangement can prevent or reduce the possibility of the firing member 2240 becoming stuck against the anvil and can reduce the force required to move the firing member 2240 distally.

[0215] Turning now to FIGS. 46-48, a firing member 2340 comprises a firing bar and a coupling member 2342 attached to the firing bar. The coupling member 2342 comprises a connector 2148 which connects the coupling member 2342 to the firing bar. The coupling member 2342 further comprises a cutting member 2041 configured to incise the tissue of a patient during a staple firing stroke. The coupling member 2342 also comprises projections 2343 configured to engage an anvil, such as anvil 2030 or 2030', for example, and, in addition, a foot 2144 configured to engage a staple cartridge jaw during the staple firing stroke. Each projection 2343 comprises a drive surface defined on the bottom side thereof. Each projection 2343 further comprises a radiused-transition 2349 extending around the perimeter thereof. The coupling member 2342 further comprises intermediate projections 2146 extending laterally therefrom which are configured to prevent the firing member 2340 from performing the staple firing stroke when an unspent staple cartridge is not positioned in front of the firing member 2340 at the outset of the staple firing stroke.

[0216] Further to the above, each projection 2343 comprises a radiused leading end 2351 . The leading end 2351 is similar to the leading end 2251 and comprises a curved surface which extends across the centerline 2350 of the projection 2343. The leading end 2251 has a different configuration than the trailing end of the projection 2243. Each projection 2343 further comprises a lateral side, or end, 2352. Each lateral end 2352 comprises a flat surface which is positioned intermediate radiused, or curved, edges 2347. A first radiused edge 2347 is positioned intermediate a top surface of the projection 2343 and the lateral end 2352 and, in addition, a second radiused edge 2347 is positioned intermediate a bottom surface of the projection 2343 and the lateral end 2352.

[0217] Turning now to FIGS. 49-51 , a firing member 2440 comprises a firing bar and a coupling member 2442 attached to the firing bar. The coupling member 2442 comprises a connector 2148 which connects the coupling member 2442 to the firing bar. The coupling member 2442 further comprises a cutting member 2041 configured to incise the tissue of a patient during a staple firing stroke. The coupling member 2442 also comprises projections 2443 configured to engage an anvil, such as anvil 2030 or 2030', for example, and, in addition, a foot 2144 configured to engage a staple cartridge jaw during the staple firing stroke. Each projection 2443 comprises a drive surface 2445 defined on the bottom side thereof. Each projection 2443 further comprises a radiused-transition extending around the perimeter thereof. The coupling member 2442 further comprises intermediate projections 2146 extending laterally therefrom which are configured to prevent the firing member 2440 from performing the staple firing stroke when an unspent staple cartridge is not positioned in front of the firing member 2440 at the outset of the staple firing stroke.

[0218] Further to the above, the lateral sides, or ends, of each projection 2443 are defined by more than one radius of curvature. Each projection 2443 comprises a first radius of curvature 2447a extending from the bottom drive surface 2445 and a second radius of curvature 2447b extending from the top surface of the projection 2443. The first radius of curvature 2447a is different than the second radius of curvature 2447b. For instance, the first radius of curvature 2447a is larger than the second radius of curvature 2447b; however, the curvatures 2447a and 2447b can comprise any suitable configuration. Referring primarily to FIG. 51 , the first radius of curvature 2447a extends upwardly past a centerline 2450 of the projection 2443.

[0219] Turning now to FIGS. 52-54, a firing member 2540 comprises a firing bar and a coupling member 2542 attached to the firing bar. The coupling member 2542 comprises a connector 2148 which connects the coupling member 2542 to the firing bar. The coupling member 2542 further comprises a cutting member 2041 configured to incise the tissue of a patient during a staple firing stroke. The coupling member 2542 also comprises projections 2543 configured to engage an anvil, such as anvil 2030 or 2030', for example, and, in addition, a foot 2144 configured to engage a staple cartridge jaw during the staple firing stroke. Each projection 2543 comprises a drive surface defined on the bottom side thereof. Each projection 2543 further comprises a radiused-transition extending around the perimeter thereof. The coupling member 2542 further comprises intermediate projections 2146 extending laterally therefrom which are configured to prevent the firing member 2540 from performing the staple firing stroke when an unspent staple cartridge is not positioned in front of the firing member 2540 at the outset of the staple firing stroke.

[0220] Further to the above, each projection 2543 comprises a lateral side, or end, 2552 which is flat, or at least substantially flat. Each projection 2543 further comprises a radiused transition 2547 extending around the lateral end 2552. Each projection 2543 is symmetrical, or at least substantially symmetrical, about a longitudinal centerline which extends through the lateral end 2552. Moreover, the top surface and the bottom surface of each projection 2543 are parallel to one another.

[0221] Referring primarily to FIG. 53, the leading end 2551 of each projection 2543 is positioned distally with respect to a cutting edge 2042 of the cutting portion 2041 . The trailing end 2559 of each projection 2543 is positioned proximally with respect to the cutting edge 2042. As a result, the projections 2043 longitudinally span the cutting edge 2042. In such instances, the firing member 2540 can hold the anvil and the staple cartridge together directly at the location in which the tissue is being cut.

[0222] Turning now to FIGS. 55-57, a firing member 2640 comprises a firing bar and a coupling member 2642 attached to the firing bar. The coupling member 2642 comprises a connector 2148 which connects the coupling member 2642 to the firing bar. The coupling member 2642 further comprises a cutting member 2041 configured to incise the tissue of a patient during a staple firing stroke. The coupling member 2642 also comprises projections 2643 configured to engage an anvil, such as anvil 2030 or 2030', for example, and, in addition, a foot 2144 configured to engage a staple cartridge jaw during the staple firing stroke. Each

projection 2643 comprises a drive surface 2645 defined on the bottom side thereof. Each projection 2643 further comprises a radiused-transition 2649 extending around the perimeter thereof. The coupling member 2642 further comprises intermediate projections 2146 extending laterally therefrom which are configured to prevent the firing member 2640 from performing the staple firing stroke when an unspent staple cartridge is not positioned in front of the firing member 2640 at the outset of the staple firing stroke.

[0223] Further to the above, each projection 2643 further comprises a lateral end 2652, a bottom drive surface 2645, and a top surface 2647. The bottom drive surface 2645 is flat and is parallel to the longitudinal firing path 2660 of the firing member 2640. Referring primarily to FIG. 57, the top surface 2647 is flat, but not parallel to the longitudinal firing path 2660. Moreover, the top surface 2647 is not parallel to the bottom surface 2645. As a result, each projection 2643 is asymmetrical. In fact, the orientation of the top surface 2647 shifts the moment of inertia of the projection 2643 above the lateral end 2652. Such an arrangement can increase the bending stiffness of the projections 2643 which can reduce the deflection of the projections 2643.

[0224] Turning now to FIGS. 58-60, a firing member 2740 comprises a firing bar and a coupling member 2742 attached to the firing bar. The coupling member 2742 comprises a connector 2148 which connects the coupling member 2742 to the firing bar. The coupling member 2742 further comprises a cutting member 2041 configured to incise the tissue of a patient during a staple firing stroke. The coupling member 2742 also comprises projections 2743 configured to engage an anvil, such as anvil 2030 or 2030', for example, and, in addition, a foot 2144 configured to engage a staple cartridge jaw during the staple firing stroke. Each projection 2743 comprises a drive surface defined on the bottom side thereof. The coupling member 2742 further comprises intermediate projections 2146 extending laterally therefrom which are configured to prevent the firing member 2740 from performing the staple firing stroke when an unspent staple cartridge is not positioned in front of the firing member 2740 at the outset of the staple firing stroke.

[0225] Further to the above, each projection 2743 comprises a first, or leading, portion 2753a and a second, or lagging, portion 2753b positioned distally behind the leading portion 2753a. The leading portion 2753a comprises a curved lead-in surface 2751 defined on the distal end thereof which is configured to initially engage the anvil. The leading portion 2753a further comprises a first, or leading, drive surface 2745a defined on the bottom side thereof. Similarly, the lagging portion 2753b comprises a second, or lagging, drive surface 2745b defined on the

bottom side thereof. Each projection 2743 further comprises a transition 2752 defined between the leading portion 2753a and the lagging portion 2753b.

[0226] As the firing member 2740 is advanced distally, further to the above, the drive surfaces 2745a and 2745b can co-operate to engage and position the anvil. In certain embodiments, the drive surfaces 2745a and 2745b define a drive plane which is parallel, or at least substantially parallel, to the longitudinal path 2760 of the firing member 2740 during the staple firing stroke. In some instances, however, only the leading drive surface 2745a may engage the cam surface defined on the anvil. Such instances can arise when the firing member 2740 progressively closes the anvil, for example.

[0227] In other embodiments, referring to FIGS. 69 and 71 , the leading drive surface 2745a is positioned above the lagging drive surface 2745b. Stated another way, the leading drive surface 2745a is positioned further away from the longitudinal path 2760 than the lagging drive surface 2745b such that both drive surfaces 2745a and 2745b remain in contact with the anvil during the staple firing stroke. In at least one instance, the drive surfaces 2745a and 2745b can define a drive plane which is transverse to the longitudinal path 2760. In certain instances, a 1 degree angle, for example, can be defined between the drive plane and the longitudinal path 2760. In various instances, the leading drive surface 2745a is positioned vertically above the lagging drive surface 2745b by approximately 0.001 ", for example. In other embodiments, the leading drive surface 2745a is positioned vertically above the lagging drive surface 2745b by approximately 0.002", for example. In certain instances, the leading drive surface 2745a is positioned above the lagging drive surface 2745b a distance which is between about 0.001 " and about 0.002", for example

[0228] In certain instances, referring again to FIG. 70, only the lagging drive surfaces 2745b may be in contact with the cam surfaces of the anvil when the firing member 2740 progressively closes the anvil. In such instances, the leading drive surfaces 2745a are not in contact with the cam surfaces of the anvil. Such an arrangement can reduce the plastic deformation of the projections 2743 and reduce to force needed to advance the firing member 2740 distally as compared to when only the leading drive surfaces 2745a are in contact with the cam surfaces of the anvil. When the anvil begins to flex owing to the staple forming load being applied to the anvil, in some instances, the anvil can flex upwardly into contact with the leasing drive surfaces 2745a as illustrated in FIG. 71 .

[0229] The leading portion 2753a is thicker than the lagging portion 2753b. Stated another way, the leading portion 2753a has a larger bending moment of inertia than the lagging portion 2753b which can resist the upward bending of the projection 2743. As a result, the lagging

portion 2753b can deflect upwardly more than the leading portion 2753a. In such instances, it is more likely that both portions 2753a and 2753b of the projections 2743 can remain in contact with the anvil during the staple firing stroke even though the firing member 2740 is being used to progressively close the anvil. Moreover, the leading portion 2753a also has a larger shear thickness than the lagging portion 2753b which can better resist shear forces transmitted through the projections 2743. The leading portion 2753a is often exposed to greater shear forces than the lagging portion 2753b and, as a result, can benefit from the increased shear thickness. If it is believed that the lagging portion 2753b may experience greater shear forces than the leading projection 2753a, then the lagging portion 2753b can have a greater shear thickness than the leading portion 2753a, for example.

[0230] Turning now to FIGS. 61 -63, a firing member 2840 comprises a firing bar and a coupling member 2842 attached to the firing bar. The coupling member 2842 comprises a connector 2148 which connects the coupling member 2842 to the firing bar. The coupling member 2842 further comprises a cutting member 2041 configured to incise the tissue of a patient during a staple firing stroke. The coupling member 2842 also comprises projections configured to engage an anvil, such as anvil 2030 or 2030', for example, and, in addition, a foot 2144 configured to engage a staple cartridge jaw during the staple firing stroke. As described in greater detail below, each projection comprises a drive surface defined on the bottom side thereof. The coupling member 2842 further comprises intermediate projections 2146 extending laterally therefrom which are configured to prevent the firing member 2840 from performing the staple firing stroke when an unspent staple cartridge is not positioned in front of the firing member 2840 at the outset of the staple firing stroke.

[0231] Further to the above, each side of the coupling member comprises a first, or leading, projection 2843d and a second, or lagging, projection 2843p positioned behind the leading projection 2843d. The leading projection 2843d comprises a curved lead-in surface 2851 d defined on the distal end thereof which is configured to initially engage the anvil. The leading projection 2843d further comprises a first, or leading, drive surface 2845d defined on the bottom side thereof. Similarly, the lagging projection 2843p comprises a curved lead-in surface 2851 p defined on the distal end thereof which is configured to engage the anvil. The lagging projection 2843p further comprises a second, or lagging, drive surface 2845p defined on the bottom side thereof.

[0232] As the firing member 2840 is advanced distally, further to the above, the drive surfaces 2845d and 2845p can co-operate to engage and position the anvil. In certain embodiments, the drive surfaces 2845d and 2845p define a drive plane which is parallel, or at least substantially parallel, to the longitudinal path 2860 of the firing member 2840 during the staple firing stroke. In other embodiments, the leading drive surface 2845d is positioned above the lagging drive surface 2845p. Stated another way, the leading drive surface 2845d is positioned further away from the longitudinal path 2860 than the lagging drive surface 2845p. In at least one instance, the drive surfaces 2845d and 2845p can define a drive plane which is transverse to the longitudinal path 2860. In certain instances, a 1 degree angle, for example, can be defined between the drive plane and the longitudinal path 2860.

[0233] Further to the above, the leading projections 2843d and the lagging projections 2843p can move relative to each other. In various instances, a leading projection 2843d and a lagging projection 2843p on one side of the coupling member 2842 can move independently of one another. Such an arrangement can allow the projections 2843d and 2843p to independently adapt to the orientation of the anvil, especially when the firing member 2840 is used to progressively close the anvil. As a result, both of the projections 2843d and 2843p can remain engaged with the anvil such that forces flow between the firing member 2840 and the anvil at several locations and that the plastic deformation of the projections is reduced.

[0234] FIG. 68 depicts the energy required for a first firing member to complete a firing stroke, labeled as 2090', and a second firing member to complete a firing stroke, labeled as 3090. The firing stroke 2090' represents a condition in which significant plastic deformation and galling is occurring. The firing stroke 3090 represents an improvement over the firing stroke 2090' in which the deformation of the firing member and anvil ledge is mostly elastic. It is believed that, in certain instances, the plastic strain experienced by the firing member and/or anvil can be reduced by about 40%-60%, for example, by employing the teachings disclosed herein.

[0235] The various embodiments described herein can be utilized to balance the loads transmitted between a firing member and an anvil. Such embodiments can also be utilized to balance the loads transmitted between a firing member and a staple cartridge jaw. In either event, the firing member can be designed to provide a desired result but it should be understood that such a desired result may not be achieved in some circumstances owing to manufacturing tolerances of the stapling instrument and/or the variability of the tissue thickness captured within the end effector, for example. In at least one instance, the upper projections and/or the bottom foot of the firing member, for example, can comprise wearable features which are configured to allow the firing member to define a balanced interface with the anvil.

[0236] Further to the above, referring now to FIGS. 64-67, a firing member 2940 comprises lateral projections 2943. Each projection 2943 comprises longitudinal ridges 2945 extending

from the bottom thereof. The ridges 2945 are configured to plastically deform and/or smear when the firing member 2940 is advanced distally to engage the anvil. The ridges 2945 are configured to quickly wear in, or take a set, so as to increase the contact area between the projections 2943 and the anvil and provide better load balancing between the firing member 2940 and the anvil. Such an arrangement can be especially useful when the end effector is used to perform several staple firing strokes. In addition to or in lieu of the above, one or more wearable pads can be attached to the projections of the firing member which can be configured to plastically deform.

[0237] FIGS. 72 and 73 depict a surgical stapling anvil, or anvil jaw, 3100 for use with a surgical stapling instrument. The anvil 3100 is configured to deform staples during a surgical stapling procedure. The anvil 3100 comprises an anvil body 3101 and an anvil cap 31 10. The anvil body 3101 and the anvil cap 31 10 are welded together. The anvil body 3101 comprises a proximal portion 3102 comprising a coupling portion 3103. The coupling portion 3103 is configured to be assembled to an end effector of a surgical stapling instrument to permit rotation of the anvil jaw 3000 relative to a corresponding jaw such as, for example, a staple cartridge jaw. Embodiments are envisioned where the anvil jaw is fixed relative to the staple cartridge jaw and, in such instances, the staple cartridge jaw can rotate relative to the anvil jaw. The anvil body 3101 further comprises a distal tip portion 3104, outer edges 3107, and a planar, tissue-facing surface 3106. The tissue-facing surface 3106 comprises staple-forming pockets defined therein configured to deform staples during a surgical stapling procedure. The anvil body 3101 further comprises a longitudinal cavity, or aperture, 3105 configured to receive the anvil cap 31 10 therein. As discussed in greater detail below, the longitudinal cavity 3105 can comprise corresponding surfaces configured to mate with corresponding surfaces of the anvil cap 31 10 during assembly. Certain surfaces may be configured for welding while others may be configured only for alignment during assembly.

[0238] The anvil cap 31 10 comprises a proximal end 31 1 1 , a distal end 31 12, and a continuous perimeter, or edge, 31 13. When the anvil body 3101 and the anvil cap 31 10 are assembled and/or welded together, the edge 31 13 may be flush, or substantially flush, with the top surface 3108 of the anvil body 3101 so as to provide a smooth upper surface of the surgical stapling anvil 3100 although a step in the seam therebetween may be possible. Further to the above, the anvil cap 31 10 comprises a rounded upper surface 31 14. The upper surface 31 14 can be contoured and/or rounded, for example, in order to provide a continuous, curved upper surface of the surgical stapling anvil 3100 when the anvil body 3101 and the anvil cap 31 10 are welded together. In various instances, the continuous edge 31 13 is a feature configured for welding, as discussed below.

[0239] The two-piece surgical stapling anvil 3100 can permit the polishing of internal surfaces within the anvil 3100 during manufacturing. Manufacturing these parts can include processes resulting in a less than desirable surface finish of various surfaces within the anvil. Improving the finish of various internal surfaces can reduce internal frictional forces between the anvil and a staple firing member passing therethrough. Reducing the internal frictional forces can reduce the force required for the firing member to move through its staple-firing stroke. Reducing the force required for a firing member to move through its staple-firing stroke can result in the reduction of the size of certain components resulting in the reduction of overall instrument size which is desirable. Such an arrangement can also reduce the number of instances of instrument failure. That said, there are challenges to a two-piece welded anvil. For example, a two-piece welded anvil may deflect more than a unitary anvil in some instances. In other words, a two-piece anvil may be less stiff than a unitary anvil and less resistant to bending. In addition, lateral deflection, or rotation, of the sides of an anvil away from a firing member or longitudinal instrument axis can cause staples to deform improperly. Such deflection can result in a vertical expansion of the overall system resulting formed staples with a formed height which is not the intended formed height. Moreover, such deflection may permit a firing member to vertically tear through an anvil of which it is camming. Also, transverse deflection, or rotation, may require more firing force to be applied to the firing member complete its firing stroke. For example, the distal portion of an anvil may deflect away from the staple cartridge due to the application of tissue-induced pressure. Minimizing this deflection can be important to create properly formed staples. The above being said, the presence of both transverse and lateral deflection can have a compounding effect. In fact, transverse deflection can induce lateral deflection of the anvil.

[0240] FIG. 74 depicts a portion of a surgical stapling anvil 3200 comprising an anvil body 3210 and an anvil cap 3220 welded to the anvil body 3210 with a weld 3201. Although only a portion of the surgical stapling anvil 3200 is illustrated, it should be understood that a mirrored portion of the illustrated portion exists to complete the surgical stapling anvil 3200. The illustrated and mirrored portions will be discussed concurrently going forward. The anvil body 3210 comprises a tissue-facing surface 321 1 comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets 3212 defined therein, ledges 3215 comprising camming surfaces 3216 configured the be contacted by the anvil-camming features of a firing member of a surgical stapling instrument, and a longitudinal slot 3213 configured to receive the firing member therethrough. The anvil body 3210 further comprises outer edges 3214. The ledges 3215 are configured to bear, or

support, a distributed load force 3231 applied by a firing member as the firing member moves through a staple-firing stroke. The anvil body 3210 further comprises a ledge 3217 configured to hold the anvil cap 3220 during welding. The ledge 3217 can aid in assembly and can ensure the proper alignment of the anvil cap 3220 and the anvil body 3210. The ledge 3217 can also act as a feature to improve overall anvil stiffness. The anvil cap 3220 comprises an upper portion 3223, a lower portion 3221 , and a ledge 3224 configured to rest on the ledge 3217 before, during, and after welding.

[0241] The upper portion 3223 of the anvil cap 3220 and the anvil body 3210 are welded together with the weld 3201 . Welding access is provided by beveled edges on one or both of the anvil body 3210 and the anvil cap 3220. In this instance, the weld surfaces of the anvil body 3210 and the anvil cap 3220 are vertical and, as a result, the weld 3201 is vertical. The weld 3201 comprises a weld length, or depth, labeled by 3202. The weld depth 3202 is about 0.030 inches, for example. Notably, the weld 3201 does not penetrate the anvil 3200 to the horizontal surfaces of the ledges 3217, 3224. With this arrangement, the anvil body 3210 will tend to rotationally deflect about the pivot axis P owing to the combination of forces applied to the anvil body 3210 by the firing member and the tissue. As the firing member cams the surfaces 3216 by pressing on the ledges 3215, represented by distributed load force 3231 , and the tissue and the cartridge push on the tissue-facing surface 321 1 , represented by distributed load force 3232, both sides of the anvil body 3210 (only one shown in FIG. 74) may tend to rotate about a pivot axis P and deflect vertically and/or outwardly with respect to the firing member and the anvil cap 3220. This deflection, represented by deflection 3233, is permitted due to the lack of weld penetration from the provided weld arrangement. In some instances, the anvil body 3210 and the anvil cap 3220 may spread apart at an non-welded portion, or seam, 3204 having a length 3203.

[0242] FIG. 75 depicts a portion of a surgical stapling anvil 3300 comprising an anvil body 3310 and an anvil cap 3320 welded to the anvil body 3310 with a weld 3301. Although only a portion of the surgical stapling anvil 3300 is illustrated, it should be understood that a mirrored portion of the illustrated portion exists to complete the surgical stapling anvil 3300. The illustrated and mirrored portions will be discussed concurrently going forward. The anvil body 3310 comprises a tissue-facing surface 331 1 comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets 3312 defined therein, ledges 3315 comprising camming surfaces 3316 configured to be contacted by the anvil-camming features of a firing member of a surgical stapling instrument, and a longitudinal slot 3313 configured to receive a firing member therethrough. The anvil body 3310 further comprises outer edges 3314. The ledges 3315 are configured to bear, or support,

a distributed load force 3331 applied by the firing member as the firing member moves through a staple-firing stroke. The anvil body 3310 further comprises an upper portion 3317 extending from the slot 3313 to the outer edge 3314. The anvil cap 3320 comprises an upper portion 3323, a lower portion 3321 , and a ledge 3224 configured to rest on the upper portion 3317 before, during, and after welding.

[0243] The ledge 3324 of the anvil cap 3320 and the upper portion 3317 of the anvil body 3310 are welded together with the weld 3301. Welding access is provided by a beveled edge of the anvil cap 3320. In this instance, the weld surfaces of the anvil body 3310 and the anvil cap 3320 are horizontal and, as a result, the weld 3301 is horizontal. The weld 3301 comprises a weld length, or depth, labeled by 3302. The weld depth 3302 is about 0.030 inches, for example. Such a weld depth 3302, however, creates a non-welded portion 3304 having a non-welded width 3303. The non-welded width is about 0.080 inches, for example. With this arrangement, the anvil body 3310 will tend to rotationally deflect about the pivot axis P and the upper portion 3317 and the ledge 3324 will tend to compress during deflection. However, a non-welded width 3303 extends between the slot 3313 and beyond the second row of staple-forming pockets 3312. In various instances, the combination of forces applied to the anvil body 3310 by the firing member and the tissue can generate a deflection indicated by deflection 3333. As the firing member cams the anvil 3300 toward the opposing staple cartridge by pressing on the ledges 3315, represented by distributed load force 3331 , and as the tissue and the staple cartridge push on the tissue-facing surface 331 1 , represented by distributed load force 3332, both sides of the anvil body 3310 (only one shown in FIG. 75) may tend to rotate and deflect vertically and/or outwardly with respect to the firing member. This deflection 3333 occurs due to the lack of weld penetration, the significant non-welded width 3304, as well as the horizontal weld arrangement 3301 .

[0244] FIG. 76 depicts a portion of a surgical stapling anvil 3400 comprising an anvil body 3410 and an anvil cap 3420 welded to the anvil body 3410 with a weld 3401 . Although only a portion of the surgical stapling anvil 3400 is illustrated, it should be understood that a mirrored portion of the illustrated portion exists to complete the surgical stapling anvil 3400. The illustrated and mirrored portions will be discussed concurrently going forward. The anvil body 3410 comprises a tissue-facing surface 341 1 comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets 3412 defined therein, ledges 3415 comprising camming surfaces 3416 configured to be contacted by the anvil-camming features of a firing member of a surgical stapling instrument, and a longitudinal slot 3413 configured to receive the firing member therethrough. The anvil body 3410 further comprises outer edges 3414. The ledges 3415 are configured to bear, or

support, a distributed load force 3431 applied by the firing member as the firing member moves through a staple-firing stroke. The anvil body 3410 further comprises a ledge 3417 configured to hold the anvil cap 3420 during welding. The ledge 3417 can aid in assembling the cap 3420 and the body 3410 and can ensure the proper alignment of the anvil cap 3420 and the anvil body 3410. The ledge 3417 can also improve the overall anvil stiffness of the anvil 3400. The anvil cap 3420 comprises an upper portion 3423, a lower portion 3421 , and a ledge 3424 configured to rest on the ledge 3417 before, during, and after welding.

[0245] The upper portion 3423 of the anvil cap 3420 and the anvil body 3410 are welded together with the weld 3401 . Welding access is provided by beveled edges of on or both of the anvil body 3410 and the anvil cap 3420. In this instance, the weld surfaces of the anvil body 3410 and the anvil cap 3420 are angled and, as a result, the weld 3401 is angled. The weld 3401 comprises a weld length, or depth, labeled by 3402. The weld depth 3402 is about 0.030 inches, for example. Notably, the weld 3401 does not penetrate the anvil 3400 to the horizontal surfaces of the ledges 3417, 3424 and, with this arrangement, the anvil body 3410 will tend to rotationally deflect about the pivot axis P. Specifically, the combination of forces applied to the anvil body 3410 by the firing member and the tissue can generate deflection represented by deflection 3433. As the firing member cams the anvil 3400 toward the opposing staple cartridge by pressing on the ledges 3415, represented by distributed load force 3431 , and the tissue and the staple cartridge push on the tissue-facing surface 341 1 , represented by distributed load force 3432, both sides of the anvil body 3410 (only one shown in FIG. 76) may tend to rotate about the pivot axis P. However, the angled weld surfaces will tend to compress as both sides of the anvil body 3410 rotate which may limit the amount of deflection that the anvil 3400 experiences. The anvil body 3410 and the anvil cap 3420 may tend to compress at a non-welded portion 3404 having a length 3403, resulting in a very strong interconnection between the cap 3420 and the body 3410.

[0246] FIG. 77 depicts a surgical stapling anvil 3500 for use with a surgical stapling instrument. The anvil 3500 comprises an anvil body 3510 and an anvil cap 3520. The anvil body 3510 comprises a tissue-facing surface 351 1 comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets 3512 defined therein, ledges 3515 comprising camming surfaces 3516 configured to be engaged by anvil-camming features of a firing member of the surgical stapling instrument, and a longitudinal slot 3513 configured to receive a firing member therethrough. The ledges 3415 are configured to bear, or support, a distributed load force applied by a firing member as the firing member moves through a staple-firing stroke. The anvil body 3510 further comprises ledges 3517 configured to hold the anvil cap 3520 in place during welding. The ledge 3517 can aid in assembling the cap 3520 and the anvil body 3510 and can ensure the proper alignment of the anvil cap 3520 and the anvil body 3510. The ledge 3517 can also improve the overall stiffness of the anvil 3500. The anvil cap 3520 comprises an upper portion 3523, a lower portion 3521 , and ledges 3524 configured to rest on the ledges 3517 before, during, and after welding.

[0247] The upper portion 3523 of the anvil cap 3520 and the anvil body 3510 are welded together with welds 3501. Only one weld 3501 is illustrated to provide clarity of the relationship of the anvil body 3510 and the anvil cap 3520 before and after welding. In this instance, the weld surfaces of the anvil body 3510 and the anvil cap 3520 are angled and, as a result, the welds 3501 are angled. Each weld 3501 comprises a weld length, or depth, labeled by 3502. The weld depth, or penetration, 3502 can be between about 0.015 inches and about 0.040 inches. In certain instances, the weld depth is 0.030 inches, for example. Notably, the welds 3501 penetrate the anvil 3500 to the horizontal surfaces of the ledges 3517, 3524. Providing angled weld surfaces that are configured to match weld penetration depth can aid in preventing anvil deflection rotationally as well as vertically. In other words, having welds with a weld penetration depth equal to or greater than that of the length of the angled weld surfaces can increase the moment of inertia and the overall stiffness of the anvil 3500. In other instances, the weld depth 3502 may be less than the length of the angled weld surfaces, or mated length. Suitable welding techniques are used to weld any of the anvils disclosed herein. In some instances a gap is present between adjacent weld surfaces which is configured to receive weld material. In some instances, a gap is not provided. In at least one such instance, the angled weld surfaces are laser welded.

[0248] FIG. 78 is a micrograph of an anvil 3600 comprising an anvil body portion 3610 and an upper anvil portion 3620. The anvil body portion 3610 comprises a tissue-facing surface 361 1 comprising a plurality of staple forming pockets 3612 defined therein, a longitudinal cavity 3613 configured to receive a firing member of a surgical instrument therethrough, and ledges 3615 configured to be engaged by a firing member during a staple firing stroke. The anvil body portion 3610 and the upper anvil portion 3620 are welded to each other with welds 3601 - each comprising a weld penetration length 3602. Notably, the welds 3601 do not penetrate the anvil 3600 to the horizontal surfaces 3617 of the upper ledges 3616 of the anvil body portion 3610.

[0249] The anvil 3600 comprises a massive non-welded width 3606 and, also, a massive a slot cavity width 3605. The non-welded width 3606 is about 125% of the cavity width 3605. The non-welded width 3606 is so wide, in fact, that the intermediate forming pocket rows 3612B and the inner forming pocket rows 3612A are defined within the non-welded width 3606. Similarly, the inner forming pockets 3612A and a portion of the intermediate forming pockets 3612B are

defined with the slot cavity width 3605. Moreover, an inner boundary axis 3619 of the intermediate rows of forming pockets 3612B is defined within both the non-welded width 3606 and the slot cavity width 3605. Such an arrangement can significantly deflect the anvil 3600 when clamping tissue and/or as the firing member moves through its staple firing stroke. Such deflections can be a result of the lack of weld penetration depth as well as a relatively large non-welded width 3605 relative to the slot width 3606.

[0250] FIG. 79 depicts an anvil 3700 comprising an anvil body portion 3710 and an anvil cap 3720. The anvil body portion 3710 comprises a planar, tissue-facing surface 371 1 including a plurality of staple-forming pockets comprising inner staple-forming pockets 3712A, intermediate staple-forming pockets 3712B, and outer staple-forming pockets 3712C. The body portion 3710 further comprises a longitudinal cavity, or slot, 3713 configured to receive a firing member therethrough, anvil-camming ledges 3715 defining radial cam surfaces 3714 configured to be engaged by a firing member as the firing member moves through its staple-firing stroke, and ledges 3716 configured to hold the anvil cap 3730. The slot 3713 comprises a first portion 3713A configured to receive a cutting member of the firing member therethrough and a second portion 3713B configured to receive an upper, camming portion of the firing member therethrough. The first portion 3713A comprises a width that is less than the width of the second portion 3713B.

[0251] The anvil cap 3720 comprises a Y-shaped cross section. The anvil cap 3720 comprises a lower portion 3721 configured to be received within the slot 3713 defining a first mating region and an upper portion 3723 configured to be welded to the anvil body 3710. The upper portion 3723 comprises ledges, or shoulders, 3724 comprising horizontal alignment surfaces configured to rest on corresponding horizontal alignment surfaces of the ledges 3716. This interface defines a second mating region which is perpendicular, or at least substantially perpendicular, to the first mating region. The horizontal alignment surfaces are at least substantially parallel to the tissue-facing surface 371 1 . The upper portion 3723 is flared with respect to the lower portion 3721 and comprises angled weld surfaces 3725 configured to be welded to corresponding angled weld surfaces 3717 of the anvil body 3710 defining a third mating region. The welds comprise weld penetration lengths equal to the length of the angled weld surfaces 3725, 3717.

[0252] The anvil 3700 comprises a non-welded width 3706 and a slot width 3705. The non-welded width 3706 is no greater than about 105% of the slot width 3705. A central plane axis "CA" is defined as the geometric center of the anvil 3700. The non-welded width 3706, i.e., the width between the welds, defines an outer boundary axis 3731 which is a first distance 3731 D

from the central axis CA. The inner staple-forming pockets 3712A define a row axis 3732 which is a second distance 3732D from the central axis CA. The second distance 3732D is less than the first distance 3731 D. As a result, all, or at least a portion of, the inner staple-forming pockets 3712A are defined within the non-welded width 3706. In other instances, the inner staple-forming pockets 3712A are positioned entirely outside of the non-welded width 3706. In such instances, the first width 3731 D is less than the second width 3732D. In certain instances, the outer boundary axis 3731 does not extend beyond an inner boundary axis of the inner staple forming pockets 3712A. The inner staple-forming pockets 3712A also define an outer boundary axis 3733 which is a third distance 3733D from the central axis CA. The third distance 3733D is greater than the first distance 3731 D and the second distance 3732D. In other instances, the inner staple-forming pockets 3712A are entirely positioned within the non-welded width 3706. In such instances, the second distance 3732D and the third distance 3733D are less than the first distance 3731 D.

[0253] The intermediate staple-forming pockets 3712B define an inner boundary axis 3734 which is a fourth distance 3734D from the central axis. The fourth distance 3734D is greater than the first distance 3731 D, the second distance 3732D, and the third distance 3733D. In other words, the non-welded width 3706 does not extend to the intermediate staple-forming pockets 3712B. Minimizing the first distance 3731 D, or the distance that the outer boundary axis 3731 D extends from the central axis CA, can increase the overall stiffness of the anvil 3700 to reduce the longitudinal and rotational, or torsional, bending, or deflection, of the anvil 3700.

[0254] FIG. 80 is a chart 3800 representing four different surgical stapling anvil arrangements subject to two different load scenarios. Model A is a one-piece, or mono-block, anvil. Model B is a two-piece anvil comprising an anvil body and an anvil cap welded to the anvil body. The anvil cap comprises an upper welded portion comprising a non-welded width wider than 105% of the slot width. Like Model B, Model C is a two-piece anvil comprising an anvil body and an anvil cap welded to the anvil body. The anvil cap comprises a non-welded width of about 105% of the slot width. However, the angle of the angular weld surfaces, which are defined between the anvil cap and the anvil body, of Model C prevents a weld depth from being formed that extends the entire length of the angular weld surfaces. In at least one instance, the weld depth is less than 0.03 inches, for example. Model D represents the anvil 3700. The anvil cap comprises a non-welded width of about 105% of the slot width and the angle of the angular weld surfaces of Model D allows a weld depth to be created that fuses the entire length of the angular weld surfaces. In at least one instance, the weld depth is at least 0.03 inches, for example. As a result, the distal tip deflection of the anvil 3700 is less than the distal tip deflection of the anvils of Model A, Model B, and Model C. Also, the overall stress in the ledges of Model B, Model C, and Model D is less than the ledges of Model A.

[0255] FIGS. 81-83 depict an anvil 3900 for use with a surgical stapling instrument. The anvil 3900 is configured to deform staples during a surgical stapling procedure. The anvil 3900 comprises an anvil body 3910 and an anvil cap 3920. The anvil body 3910 and the anvil cap 3920 are welded together. The anvil body 3910 comprises a proximal portion 3912 comprising a coupling portion configured to be assembled to an end effector of a surgical stapling instrument to permit rotation of the anvil jaw 3900 relative to a corresponding jaw such as, for example, a staple cartridge jaw. Embodiments are envisioned where the anvil jaw is fixed relative to the staple cartridge jaw and, in such instance, the staple cartridge jaw can rotate relative to the anvil jaw. The anvil body 3910 further comprises a distal tip portion 3914 and a planar, tissue-facing surface 391 1 . The tissue-facing surface 391 1 comprises staple-forming pockets 3912 defined therein which are configured to deform staples during a surgical stapling procedure. The anvil body 3910 comprises a longitudinal slot 3913 configured to receive a firing member of the surgical instrument therethrough. The anvil body 3910 further comprises camming features 3914 including radial camming surfaces 3915 configured to be engaged by anvil-camming portions of the firing member during its staple firing stroke.

[0256] Referring to FIG. 81 , the anvil cap 3920 comprises a plurality of shallow-weld zones 3930 each comprising a zone length 3930L, and a plurality of deep-weld zones 3940, each comprising a zone length 3940L. The zone lengths 3930L, 3940L are equal; however, in other instances, the zone lengths 3930L, 3940L are different. Each shallow-weld zone 3930 of the cap 3920 comprises an upper portion 3933 and a lower portion 3931. The upper portions 3933 comprise flared body portions 3934 including welding surfaces 3935. The flared body portions 3934 are configured to rest on alignment ledges 3916 of the anvil body 3910 while the welding surfaces 3935 are configured to engage, or mate, with corresponding angled welding surfaces 3917 of the anvil body 3910 (FIG. 82). Each deep-weld zone 3940 comprises an upper portion 3943 and a lower portion 3941 . The lower portion 3941 is accessible via a window 3945 extending through the upper portion 3943 of the deep weld zone 3940. The upper portions 3942 comprise alignment ledges 3944, accessible via the weld access region 3945, which are configured to rest on corresponding alignment ledges 3418 of the anvil body 3910. The alignment ledges 3916 are first distance from the tissue-facing surface 391 1 and the alignment ledges 3944 are a second distance from the tissue-facing surface 391 1 . The first distance is greater than the second distance. In other instances, the first distance and the second distance are equal.

[0257] The welding surfaces 3935, 3917 discussed above are configured to be welded together to weld the shallow-weld zones 3930 to the anvil body 3910 with a weld 3936 comprising a weld root 3937 (FIG. 83). The weld root 3937 is configured to penetrate at least to the horizontal surface of the ledge 3916. The deep-weld zones 3940 are configured to be welded to the anvil body 3910 with a weld 3946 comprising a weld root 3947 (FIG. 83). The weld access region 3945 permits a deep weld, welding the lower portion 3941 to the anvil body 3910. During welding, the entire ledge 3946 may be fused with the anvil body 3910. While the weld lengths 3938, 3948 may be similar, if not equal, the effective, or net, weld depth between the anvil cap 3920 and the anvil body 3910 increases by providing both shallow-weld zones 3930 and deep-weld zones 3940. The weld depth can be defined as the distance between an edge 3921 of an upper surface 3901 of the anvil to the weld root of the respective weld.

Alternating the shallow-weld zones 3930 and the deep-weld zones 3940 can permit shallow and deep welds on both sides of the anvil 3900 along the longitudinal length of the anvil 3900 and create a robust connection between the anvil cap 3920 and the anvil body 3910.

[0258] The shallow-weld zones 3930 and the deep-weld zones 3940 are configured increase the overall weld depth along the length of the anvil 3900. The location, longitudinal length, and quantity of shallow-weld zones 3930 and deep-weld zones 3940 can be varied to change, or tune, the stiffness of the anvil 3900 along its length. For example, the shallow-weld zones 3930 comprise a first stiffness and the deep-weld zones 3940 comprise a second stiffness which is different than the first stiffness. Such an arrangement can also permit the use of a single-depth welder to make the welds 3936, 3946, which can simplify manufacturing. In addition to these welds, a filler weld may be applied to fill the access regions 3945 after the welds 3946 have been made to increase stiffness of the anvil 3900 and reduce the likelihood of rotational deflection within the anvil 3900. Embodiments are envisioned where, instead of having longitudinally alternating zones having deep welds on both sides of the anvil and zones having shallow welds on both sides of the anvil (FIG. 81), the anvil comprises a plurality of zones extending a length L where each zone comprises a shallow weld and a deep weld on opposite sides of the anvil. For example, each zone comprises a shallow weld extending along a length L of the zone on one side of the anvil and a deep weld extending along the length L of the zone on the other side of the anvil. Moreover, in addition to having different lengths, the plurality of zones may alternate which side the shallow weld and the deep weld are made. As a result, such an anvil would comprise of both a shallow weld and a deep weld along the entire length of the anvil.

[0259] Various surgical stapling anvils disclosed herein can be manufactured using a variety of processes. For example, the anvil body portion and/or the anvil cap portions can be manufactured using a metal injection molding process. The anvil body portion and/or the anvil cap portions can also be manufactured using a machining process. In at least one instance, one of the anvil body portion and the anvil cap is manufactured using a metal injection molding process and the other one of the anvil body portion and the anvil cap is entirely manufactured using a machining process. In certain instances, electrochemical machining processes may be used to form anvil body portion, the anvil cap portion, or both the anvil body portion and the anvil cap portion. Molding processes may permit fillets to be easily incorporated into the geometries of the anvil cap and/or anvil body. Such fillets can reduce stress concentrations at locations where otherwise distinct vertices, or corners, would exist.

[0260] A method for manufacturing a surgical stapling anvil such as those disclosed herein may comprise various steps. One step of manufacturing an anvil comprises manufacturing an anvil body portion and an anvil cap member. Another step of manufacturing an anvil comprises polishing anvil-camming surfaces of the anvil body portion. In various instances, any internal surface which may contact any portion of a firing member can be polished. Another step of manufacturing an anvil comprises welding the anvil body portion and the anvil cap member together. The welding step may comprise, for example, a laser welding process. Yet another step of manufacturing an anvil comprises stamping staple-forming, or fastener forming, pockets into a tissue-facing surface of the anvil body portion.

[0261] Further to the above, the polishing step can involve polishing various zones of the anvil-camming surfaces, or ledges. The ledges can comprise a first zone and a second zone, wherein the first zone is configured to be contacted by the anvil-camming portions of a firing member and the second zone extends laterally beyond the first zone. Under normal firing circumstances, the firing member would only contact the first ledge zone and not the second ledge zone. Under abnormal firing circumstances, however, a portion of the firing member may contact the second zone. Thus, it can be advantageous to ensure that both the first zone and the second zone of the ledges are polished to reduce the likelihood of galling on the ledges when contacted by the firing member.

[0262] FIGS. 84 and 85 depict an anvil 4000 comprising an anvil body 4010 and an anvil cap 4020. The anvil body 4010 comprises a tissue-facing surface 401 1 and a plurality of staple forming pockets 4012 defined in the tissue-facing surface 401 1 . The anvil 4000 comprises a longitudinal cavity 4013 configured to receive a firing member of surgical instrument therethrough. The cavity 4013 comprises anvil-camming surfaces 4015 defined by ledges 4014 of the anvil body 4010. The firing member is configured to cam the ledges 4014 as the firing member is moved through a firing stroke. The anvil cap 4020 is welded to the anvil body 4010. A welder, such as a laser welder, for example, is permitted access to the anvil body 4010 and the anvil cap 4020 via welder access regions 4005. The welder access regions 4005 comprise openings, or beveled edges, to provide space for a welder to access the location to be welded. Larger welder access regions can ensure deeper weld penetration depth.

[0263] The anvil 4000 comprises primary welds 4001 and a secondary filler weld 4003.

Although only one secondary filler weld 4003 is illustrated, the anvil 4000 may comprise secondary filler weld on top of, or above, all existing primary welds. The filler weld 4003 provides additional stiffness to the anvil 4000 over the longitudinal length of the anvil 4000 and also aids in preventing rotational skew, or torsional bending, or twist, of the anvil sides.

Moreover, the filler weld 4003 increases the overall weld penetration depth into the anvil 4000 which increases the stiffness of the anvil 4000. The primary welds 4001 fuse corresponding angular surfaces of the anvil body 4010 and the anvil cap 4020. More specifically, the anvil body 4010 comprises a first angular surface 4019 configured to mate with a first angular surface 4029 of the anvil cap 4020, a first horizontal surface 4018 configured to mate with a first horizontal surface 4028 of the anvil cap 4020, a second angular surface 4017 configured to mate with a second angular surface 4027 of the anvil cap 4020, and a second horizontal surface 4016 configured to mate with a second horizontal surface, or bottom surface, 4026 of the anvil cap 4020. During manufacturing, a welder may be selected and configured to fuse the first angular surfaces 4019, 4029 together.

[0264] The additional angular surfaces 4017, 4027 and the horizontal surfaces 4016, 4018, 4026, 4028 are configured to aid the assembly of the anvil body 4010 and the anvil cap 4020 prior to welding during manufacturing. For example, when preparing the anvil body 4010 and the anvil cap 4020 for welding, the additional surfaces may aid in aligning the anvil body 4010 and the anvil 4020 for welding. The second horizontal surface 4016 provides a defined depth for the anvil cap 4020. In other words, the second horizontal surface 4016 defines the lowest, seatable position that the bottom surface 4026 can sit relative to the anvil body 4010.

[0265] FIG. 86 depicts an anvil 4100 comprising a first anvil member, or anvil body portion, 41 10 and a second anvil member, or anvil cap, 4130. The first anvil member 41 10 comprises a tissue-facing surface 41 1 1 comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets 41 12 defined therein. The first anvil member 41 10 also comprises a longitudinal cavity 41 13 configured to receive a firing member of a surgical instrument therethrough. The first anvil member 41 10 further

comprises anvil-camming ledges 41 14 defining anvil-camming surfaces 41 15 configured to be engaged by the firing member as the firing member moves through a firing stroke.

[0266] The first anvil member 41 10 and the second anvil member 4130 comprise interlocking features configured to increase the overall stiffness of the anvil 4100 and reduce transverse, tissue-induced bending of the anvil 4100 away from an opposing staple cartridge when the anvil 4100 is clamped against the staple cartridge. The first anvil member 41 10 comprises horizontally-extending interlocking features 41 17 received within corresponding interlocking apertures 4137 of the second anvil member 4130. The first anvil member 41 10 also comprises vertically-extending interlocking features 41 16 received within corresponding apertures 4136 of the second anvil member 4130. In various instances, the interlocking features 41 16, 41 17 may require the anvil 4100 to be assembled in only a longitudinal direction prior to being welded together. For example, the second anvil member 4130 may be slid longitudinally relative to the first anvil member in a longitudinal direction to assemble the first anvil member 41 10 and the second anvil member 4130.

[0267] The first anvil member 41 10 and the second anvil member 4130 are welded to each other with exterior welds 4101 and interior welds 4103. Welds 4101 , 4103 may comprise laser welds, for example. The exterior welds 4101 are located in the outer, lateral portions 4105 of the anvil 4100. The interior welds 4103 are located in the longitudinal cavity 41 13 which is defined by the first anvil member 41 10 and the second anvil member 4130. A laser welder, for example, can access the longitudinal cavity 41 13 through the opening, or aperture, defined between the camming ledges 41 14 to form the interior welds 4103. In various instances, the opening defined by the camming ledges 41 14 is sized to permit welder access specifically for the interior welds 4103. Such an arrangement having interior welds, exterior welds, and interlocking features can increase the overall strength of an anvil as well as reduce transverse deflection and/or torsional deflection. The interlocking features can also provide a fixed holding surface so that, while one of the first anvil member and the second anvil member is grounded during the weld preparation process, the other one of the first anvil member and the second anvil member is limited to one plane of motion. Such an arrangement can ensure that the first anvil member and the second anvil member do not move relative to each other prior to, and/or during, the welding process.

[0268] Referring now to FIG. 87, an anvil 4200 comprises an anvil body 4210 and an anvil cap 4220. The anvil body 4210 comprises a planar, tissue-contacting surface 421 1 including a plurality of staple-forming pockets 4212 defined therein. The anvil body 4210 also comprises a longitudinal cavity 4213 configured to receive a firing member of a surgical instrument

therethrough. The anvil body 4210 further comprises anvil-camming ledges 4214 defining anvil-camming surfaces 4215 configured to be engaged by the firing member as the firing member moves through a firing stroke.

[0269] The anvil cap 4220 is positioned within the longitudinal cavity 4213 and is welded to the anvil body 4210 with welds 4201 . The welds 4201 may comprise laser welds, for example. The anvil cap 4220 comprises lateral projections, or interlocking features, 4221 configured to be received within apertures 4216 of the anvil body 4210. The welds 4201 comprise a weld depth that does not penetrate into the projections 4221 , however, embodiments are envisioned where the welds 4201 extend to the projections 4221 or into the projections 4221 .

[0270] FIGS. 88-92 depict a surgical stapling assembly 4300 comprising a welded anvil which employs another arrangement to aid in the prevention of, and/or the limiting of, the longitudinal bending of the welded anvil. The surgical stapling assembly 4300 comprises an anvil jaw 4340 comprising an anvil body 4350 and an anvil cap 4360, a cartridge channel jaw 4330 configured to receive a staple cartridge within a cartridge-receiving aperture 4333 thereof, and a closure mechanism 4310 configured to pivot the anvil jaw 4340 relative to the cartridge channel jaw 4330 with a cam mechanism. That said, embodiments are envisioned where the cartridge channel jaw 4330 is pivoted relative to the anvil jaw 4340. The anvil body 4350 comprises a tissue facing surface 4351 comprising a plurality of staple forming pockets defined therein which are configured to deform the staples ejected from a surgical staple cartridge. The stapling assembly 4300 further comprises a firing member 4370 configured to move longitudinally within a slot 4357 of the anvil jaw 4340 and within a slot 4331 of the cartridge channel jaw 4330 to deploy a plurality of staples stored within a staple cartridge and configured to cut tissue captured between the anvil jaw 4340 and the cartridge channel jaw 4330 during a firing stroke.

[0271] The surgical stapling assembly 4300 comprises means for improving the overall stiffness and strength of the anvil jaw 4340 by reducing the stiffness of the cartridge channel jaw 4330. The cartridge channel comprises channel walls 4334 comprising proximal wall portions 4335 and distal wall portions 4337. The anvil jaw 4340 is configured to hug, or surround the cartridge channel jaw 4330, specifically the proximal wall portions 4335, when the anvil jaw 4340 is pivoted toward the cartridge channel jaw 4330. The anvil body 4350 comprises proximal surrounding portions 4352 configured to hug, or surround, the proximal wall portions 4335 as the anvil jaw 4340 is pivoted from an open configuration (FIG. 88) into a closed configuration (FIG. 89) by the closure mechanism 4310. The proximal surrounding portions 4352 further comprise tissue stops 4359 configured to limit the proximal movement of tissue into the surgical stapling assembly 4300.

[0272] The proximal surrounding portions 4352 comprise a lower portion 4354, an upper portion 4353, and a ledge 4356 defined therebetween. The lower portions 4354 are configured to overlap the proximal wall portions 4335 when the stapling assembly 4300 is in the closed configuration (FIG. 91 , e.g.). The upper portions 4353 are thicker, or larger, than the lower portions 4354; however, the upper portions 4353 and the lower portions 4354 can have any suitable configuration. Collectively, the thicker upper portions 4353 and the lower portions 4354 are configured to increase the overall stiffness and moment of inertia of the anvil jaw 4340. The ledges 4336 of the channel jaw 4330 face corresponding ledges 4356 of the proximal surrounding portions 4352 when the stapling assembly 4300 is in the closed configuration.

[0273] Referring primarily to FIG. 92, the proximal wall portions 4335 comprise a cutout comprising a wall thickness that is less than that of the distal wall portions 4337. The proximal wall portions 4335 also comprise a smaller height than distal wall portions 4337 (FIG. 91 ).

Providing thinner and smaller walls in the proximal portion of the cartridge channel jaw 4330 allows for more space for the proximal surrounding portion 4352 of the anvil jaw 4340 to be thicker and, overall, larger, thus increasing the stiffness of the anvil jaw 4340. In previous designs, the cartridge channel jaw of a stapling assembly comprised a substantially greater stiffness than the anvil of the stapling assembly. The present arrangement sacrifices some of the stiffness of the cartridge channel jaw to stiffen the anvil jaw by removing material from the cartridge channel jaw and adding the material to the anvil jaw all while maintaining a desirable instrument diameter. In various instances, a desired instrument diameter can be 5mm, 8mm, or 12 mm, for example. As a result of the above, the proximal surrounding portions 4352 comprise a volume of material configured to occupy a void defined as the space beyond the proximal wall portions 4335 but within the instrument diameter.

[0274] Further to the above, the anvil jaw 4340 comprises a first stiffness and the cartridge channel jaw 4330 comprises a second stiffness. The stapling assembly 4300 comprises structural means for reducing the second stiffness to increase the first stiffness. In various instances, the first stiffness and the second stiffness comprise a ratio of between about 1 :3 and about 1 : 1 . In some instances, the first stiffness and the second stiffness comprise a ratio of about 1 :3. In other instances, the first stiffness and the second stiffness comprise a ratio of about 1 : 1 .

[0275] Referring now to FIGS. 93-95, a cartridge channel jaw 4400 comprises a body portion 4410 and a cap portion 4430. The body portion 4410 comprises a longitudinal cavity 4415 (FIG. 94) configured to receive the cap portion 4430. Such an arrangement can permit the polishing of various internal surfaces of the channel jaw 4400 during manufacturing to reduce the force to advance, or fire, a firing member through a surgical instrument. The cartridge channel jaw 4400 comprises a staple cartridge-receiving cavity 4401 defined by channel walls 441 1 of the body portion 4410 which is configured to receive a staple cartridge therein, a proximal portion 4405 configured to be coupled to an instrument shaft, and a distal portion 4407. A replaceable staple cartridge is configured to be inserted, or installed, into the cartridge channel jaw 4400.

Referring to FIG. 95, the body portion 4410 further comprises a longitudinal aperture 4413 configured to receive a portion of a firing member of a surgical instrument therethrough as the firing member moves through a staple firing stroke.

[0276] The longitudinal cavity 4415 of the body portion 4410 defines ledges 4413 (FIG. 95) which are configured to hold the cap portion 4430 in place relative the body portion 4410 for welding. The cap portion 4430 comprises cap walls 4433 and is welded to the body portion 4410 with welds 4409. The welds 4409 may comprise laser welds, for example. The cap portion 4430 and the ledges 4413 of the body portion 4410 define a longitudinal slot 4403 configured to slidingly receive a portion of the firing member. The longitudinal slot 4403 is polished prior to welding the cap portion 4430 to the body portion 4410. In various instances, the entirety of the longitudinal slot 4403 is polished. For example, the internal surfaces of the cap portion 4430 as well as the ledges 4413 are polished. Polishing the ledges 4413 can be advantageous such that, as the firing member moves through its staple firing stroke, the polished ledges 4413 can reduce friction between the cartridge channel jaw 4400 and the firing member and, therefore, galling of the surfaces which would increase the force to fire the surgical instrument. In other instances, only certain surfaces of the cap portion 4430 are polished. In such instances, only the horizontal surface 4435 of the cap portion 4430 and the ledges 4413 may be polished.

[0277] FIGS. 96-107 compare two different firing members 4500, 4600 for use with surgical stapling systems 4800, 4700, respectively. The firing member 4500 (FIG. 96) comprises a body 4510 comprising a proximal connection portion 4512 and a cutting member 451 1 configured to cut tissue during a staple-firing stroke. The firing member 4500 further comprises a channel jaw-coupling member 4520 and a anvil jaw-coupling member 4530 configured to hold an anvil jaw and a channel jaw relative to each other during a staple-firing stroke of the firing member 4500. Similarly, the firing member 4600 (FIG. 97) comprises a body 4610 comprising a proximal connection portion 4612, a cutting member 461 1 configured to cut tissue during a staple-firing stroke, and a lockout feature 4615. The firing member 4600 further comprises a channel jaw-coupling member 4620 and a anvil jaw-coupling member 4630 configured to hold

an anvil jaw and a channel jaw relative to each other during a staple-firing stroke of the firing member 4600.

[0278] Referring now to FIGS. 98 and 99, the anvil jaw-coupling member 4530 of the firing member 4500 comprises lateral projections, or anvil-camming features, 4531 extending from lateral sides of the body 4510. The projections are filleted relative to the body 4510 with fillets 4532. The projections 4531 also comprise outer, rounded corners 4533. The anvil, jaw-coupling member 4530 defines an upper, planar surface 4534. Each projection 4531 comprises a lateral width, or thickness, 4545 and a vertical thickness 4541. The lateral width 4545 is defined as the distance between the body 4510 and an outer edge 4536 of the projection 4531 . The lateral projections 4531 define a projection axis 4543 which is angled at about one degree relative to a horizontal surface of firing member 4500 such as, for example, an upper camming surface 4521 of the channel jaw-coupling member 4520. Angling the projections 4531 may reduce galling of the contact surfaces. The lateral projections 4531 further comprise a longitudinal length 4542 (FIG. 102) defined as the distance between a leading edge 4535 of the projection 4531 and a trailing edge 4537 of the projection 4531.

[0279] The longitudinal length 4542 and the vertical thickness 4541 of the lateral projections 4531 comprise a ratio of between about 2.5:1 and about 20:1 , for example. In certain instances, the longitudinal length 4542 and the vertical thickness 4541 comprise a ratio of between about 5: 1 and about 10:1 . In some instances, the longitudinal length 4542 and the vertical thickness 4541 comprise a ratio of about 5:1 . In various instances, the vertical thickness 4541 and the lateral width 4545 comprise a ratio of between about 1 :2 and about 1 :1 , for example. In certain instances, the vertical thickness 4541 and the lateral width 4545 comprise a ratio of about 1 : 1. These arrangements reduce ledge deflection and, in turn, reduce the deflection of the projections 4531 of the firing member 4500. These arrangements also encourage pure shear as the main source of deflection which increases the ability of the projections to resist deformation. Arrangements where bending of the projections is the main source of deflection may result in a greater likelihood of plastic deformation of the projections.

[0280] Referring now to FIGS. 100 and 101 , the anvil jaw-coupling member 4630 comprises lateral projections, or anvil-camming features, 4631 extending from lateral sides of the body 4610. Each projection 4631 comprises a lateral width, or thickness, 4645 and a vertical thickness 4641 . The lateral width 4645 is defined as the distance between the body 4610 and an outer edge 4636 of the projection 4631 . The lateral projections 4631 further comprise a longitudinal length 4642 (FIG. 103) defined as the distance between a leading edge 4635 of the projection 4631 and a trailing edge 4637 of the projection 4631 . The longitudinal length 4542 is greater than the longitudinal length 4642.

[0281] Turning now to FIG. 104, a stapling system 4700 comprises an end effector for use with a surgical instrument which includes an anvil jaw 4750, a cartridge channel jaw 4780, and a staple cartridge 4710 installed within the cartridge channel jaw 4780. The stapling system 4700 also comprises the firing member 4600, discussed above. The staple cartridge 4710 comprises a plurality of staples removably stored within staple cavities 4712 of the staple cartridge 4710 configured to be fired by the firing member 4600, a cartridge deck, or tissue-facing surface, 471 1 , and a longitudinal slot 4713 configured to receive the firing member 4600 therethrough. The anvil jaw 4750 comprises a tissue-facing surface 4751 comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets 4752 configured to deform the staples, an anvil slot 4753 configured to receive the jaw-coupling member 4630 of the firing member 4600 therethrough, and camming ledges 4755 configured to be engaged by the projections 4631 of the firing member 4600 as the firing member 4600 moves through its staple firing stroke. The channel 4780 comprises channel walls 4781 , a longitudinal slot, or cavity, 4785 configured to receive the jaw-coupling member 4620 therethrough, and camming ledges 4783 configured to be engaged by the jaw-coupling member 4620 as the firing member 4600 moves through its staple-firing stroke. In this scenario, the projections 4631 act as cantilever beams resulting in much less force required to bend the projections 4631 than in the system described below.

[0282] Turning now to FIG. 105, a stapling system 4800 comprises an end effector for use with a surgical instrument comprising the anvil jaw 3700, the cartridge channel jaw 4400, and a staple cartridge 4810 installed within the cartridge channel jaw 4400. The system 4800 also comprises the firing member 4500. The staple cartridge 4810 comprises a plurality of staples removably stored within staple cavities 4812 of the staple cartridge 4810 configured to be fired by the firing member 4500, a cartridge deck, or tissue-facing surface, 481 1 , and a longitudinal slot 4813 configured to receive the firing member 4500 therethrough. The anvil slot 3713 is configured to receive the jaw-coupling member 4530 of the firing member 4500 therethrough and the camming ledges 3715 are configured to be engaged by the projections 4531 as the firing member 4500 moves through its staple firing stroke. In such instances, the rounded edges 4533 of the projections 4531 are configured to engage the radiused portions 3714 of the camming ledges 3715. The longitudinal slot 4403 of channel jaw 4400 is configured to receive the jaw-coupling member 4520 therethrough and the camming ledges 4413 are configured to be engaged by the jaw-coupling member 4520 as the firing member 4500 moves through its staple-firing stroke. In this scenario, the main source of deflection of the projections 4531 is caused by shear stress requiring a much greater force to deform the projections 4531 than the force required to deform the projections 4631 of the system 4700 illustrated in FIG. 104.

[0283] Turning now to FIGS. 106 and 107, a comparison of the deflection of the ledges of each stapling system 4700, 4800 is illustrated. An identical firing load is applied to the stapling systems 4700, 4800 illustrated in FIGS. 106 and 107. In FIG. 106, the system 4800 is illustrated with a deflection 4801 . In FIG. 107, the system 4700 is illustrated with a deflection 4701 which is greater than the deflection 4801 . This difference can be due, in part, to the lack of stiffness of the projections 4631 , the geometry of the ledges 4755 and their lack of ability to resist bending, the increased stiffness of the projections 4531 , and/or the geometry of the ledges 3715 and their ability to resist bending, among other things. For instance, the stapling system 4800 places the projections 4531 and the ledges 3715 primarily in shear increasing their ability to resist deformation. Moreover, rounding the projections and shortening the width of the projections of the firing member increases stiffness of the corresponding jaw-coupling member as well as the anvil due to the fact that more material of the anvil is permitted.

[0284] In certain instances, balancing the stiffnesses of the ledge 3715 and the projections 4531 will balance the magnitude of deflection of the ledge 3715 and the magnitude of deflection of the projection 4531 during a firing stroke of the firing member. As a result of such balanced deflections, neither the ledge nor the projection will dominate each other in terms of deflection and, thus, neither the ledge nor the projection will cause the other to plastically deform substantially more than the other and possibly not at all, during the firing stroke. In various instances, the stiffness of the ledge is equal to, substantially equal to, or less than the stiffness of the projection. In certain instances, the height, or vertical thickness, of the ledge is substantially similar to the height, or vertical thickness, of the projection. In addition to, or in lieu of, providing balanced geometries of the ledge and the projection, the materials of the ledge and the projection can be selected based on yield strength and/or hardness values, for example. Having materials with similar yield strengths and/or hardness values of the materials can encourage equal, or balanced, deflection of the ledge and the projection.

[0285] FIG. 108 is a stress and strain analysis 4900 of the anvil 3700 comprising a weld 3701 during the advancement of the firing member 4500. As can be seen in FIG. 108, the combination of the application of a distributed load 4903 by the firing member 4500 to the ledges 3715 and the application of a distributed load 4905 by the tissue and cartridge 4810 to the tissue-facing surface 371 1 results in a deflection 4901 and a stress profile as illustrated. The stress analysis shows low stress regions 4907, medium stress regions 4908, and high

stress regions 4909. Notably, the stress at and near the weld 3701 is evenly distributed and does not localize, or concentrate, at or near the weld 3701 .

[0286] In various designs, a T-shaped cutter bit is used to machine the slot in the anvil and/or channel that receives the jaw-coupling members of a firing member. This method of machining can cause bit chatter which can roughen the surface of the slots cut with the T-shaped cutter bit. In two-piece anvil and channel designs, a standard cutter bit can be used eliminating this issue to provide a better surface finish and resulting in a reduced force to fire the firing member.

[0287] Another way to reduce the force to fire may include coating at least the polished surfaces of the anvil with a material to reduce the coefficient of friction of those surfaces. Such a coating can comprise Medcoat 2000, for example.

[0288] During manufacturing of various welded anvil designs disclosed herein, x-ray techniques may be employed to verify weld depth and/or weld integrity to reduce faulty resultant welds from passing a quality control test lacking an x-ray step. Another quality control step may include a batch destructive test where an anvil is sliced and then analyzed to ensure proper weld depth and/or weld integrity.

[0289] Various materials to increase strength and/or provide desirable weld materials may be used in the manufacturing of various two-piece anvil designs disclosed herein. For example, a Tungsten-rhenium alloy may be used for the anvil cap material. In various instances, a W-3, W-5, W-25, or W-26 Tungsten-rhenium alloy may be used for the anvil cap material. In some instances, a silver-nickel clad may be used for the anvil cap and a 416 stainless steel or 17-4 stainless steel may be used for the anvil body, for example.

[0290] As discussed above, the anvil body and the anvil cap may comprise different materials. These materials can be selected based on weldability and/or strength, for example. In addition to weldability and strength, another material selection process may factor in hardness. This can be particularly important for the anvil-camming ledges of the anvil body. In some instances, the material selected for the anvil body can comprise of a hardness value which is greater than the hardness value of the anvil cap. The anvil-camming ledges may then be less resistant to galling than if the anvil body and the anvil cap were both manufactured using a softer material.

[0291] In certain instances, the rows of forming pockets may be stamped into the tissue-facing surface of the anvil. In such instances, a slit, or notch, may be cut into the tissue-facing surface to provide space for material to move toward, or into, during the stamping process. This may permit all of the forming pocket rows to comprise forming pockets having equal pocket depths where stamping the pockets without the precut slit may make equal pocket depths amongst the rows difficult.

[0292] Examples

Example 1 - A surgical stapling anvil for use with a surgical instrument, wherein the surgical stapling anvil comprises an anvil body comprising a tissue-facing surface comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets defined therein and a longitudinal cavity defined therein. The longitudinal cavity comprises a first cavity portion comprising a first width, wherein the first cavity portion is configured to receive at least a portion of a cutting edge of a firing member of the surgical instrument therethrough, a second cavity portion comprising a second width which is greater than the first width, wherein the second cavity portion is configured to receive an anvil-engaging portion of the firing member therethrough, and a third cavity portion comprising a third width which is greater than the second width, wherein the third cavity portion further comprises a first angular surface which flares outward relative to the second cavity portion. The anvil further comprises an anvil cap comprising a first section positioned within a portion of the second cavity portion and a second section positioned within the third cavity portion, wherein the second section comprises a second angular surface corresponding to the first angular surface, and wherein a mated portion of the first angular surface and the second angular surface define a mated depth. The anvil further comprises a weld welding the first angular surface and the second angular surface together, wherein the weld comprises a weld depth which is substantially equal to the mated depth.

Example 2 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 1 , wherein the anvil cap comprises a Y-shaped cross section.

Example 3 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 1 or 2, wherein the weld depth is between about 0.015 inches and about 0.040 inches.

Example 4 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 3, wherein the weld depth is 0.030 inches.

Example 5 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 1 , 2, 3, or 4, wherein the third cavity portion comprises a first ledge surface, wherein the second section comprises a second ledge surface corresponding to the first ledge surface, and wherein the first ledge surface and the second ledge surface are at least substantially parallel to the tissue-facing surface.

Example 6 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 5, wherein the weld extends into the ledge surfaces.

Example 7 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6, wherein the weld comprises a laser weld.

Example 8 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7, wherein the weld depth is less than the mated depth.

Example 9 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7, wherein the weld depth is greater than the mated depth.

Example 10 - A surgical stapling anvil for use with a surgical instrument, wherein the surgical stapling anvil comprises a first anvil member comprising a tissue-facing surface comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets defined therein and a longitudinal cavity. The longitudinal cavity comprises a first cavity portion comprising a first width, wherein the first cavity portion is configured to receive at least a portion of a cutting edge of a firing member of the surgical instrument therethrough, a second cavity portion comprising a second width which is greater than the first width, wherein the second cavity portion is configured to receive an anvil-engaging portion of the firing member therethrough, and a third cavity portion comprising a third width which is greater than the second width. The anvil further comprises a second anvil member comprising a first section positioned within the second cavity portion, a second section positioned within the third cavity portion, wherein the second section comprises a fourth width which is greater than the second width, and a transition edge, wherein the first section and the second section transition at the transition edge. The anvil further comprises a weld connecting the second section and the first anvil member together, wherein the weld extends at least to the transition edge.

Example 1 1 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 10, wherein the second section flares outwardly relative to the first section.

Example 12 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 10 or 1 1 , wherein the second anvil member comprises a Y-shaped cross section.

Example 13 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 10, 1 1 , or 12, wherein the weld comprises a weld depth of between about 0.015 inches and about 0.040 inches.

Example 14 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 10, 1 1 , 12, or 13, wherein the transition edge comprises a ledge surface at least substantially parallel to the tissue-facing surface.

Example 15 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 14, wherein the weld extends into the ledge surface.

Example 16 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 10, 1 1 , 12, 13, 14, or 15, wherein the weld comprises a laser weld.

Example 17 - A surgical stapling anvil comprising a first anvil member comprising a longitudinal slot configured to receive a firing member of a surgical instrument therethrough and a tissue-facing surface comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets defined therein. The anvil further comprises a second anvil member and a weld welding the first anvil member and the second anvil member together, wherein the first anvil member and the second anvil member comprise

first mating surfaces at least substantially perpendicular to the tissue-facing surface, and second mating surfaces angled relative to the tissue-facing surface, wherein the weld connects at least the second mating surfaces together.

Example 18 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 17, wherein the weld also connects at least a portion of the first mating surfaces together.

Example 19 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 17 or 18, wherein the first anvil member and the second anvil member further comprise third mating surfaces at least substantially parallel to the tissue-facing surface.

Example 20 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 19, wherein the second mating surfaces and the third mating surfaces are configured to aid in holding the second anvil member relative to the first anvil member for welding.

Example 21 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 19 or 20, wherein the weld also welds at least a portion of the third mating surfaces together.

Example 22 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 17, 18, 19, or 20, or 21 , wherein the second mating surfaces comprise a mated depth which at least substantially matches a predetermined weld depth of a welder used to weld the second mating surfaces together.

Example 23 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 , or 22, wherein the weld comprises a weld depth of between about 0.015 inches and about 0.040 inches.

Example 24 - A surgical stapling anvil comprising an anvil body comprising a tissue-facing surface, a plurality of staple forming pockets defined in the tissue-facing surface, and a longitudinal slot. The longitudinal slot comprises a first portion comprising a first width, wherein the first portion is configured to receive a cutting edge of a firing member therethrough, and a second portion comprising a second width greater than the first width, wherein the second portion is configured to receive an anvil-camming portion of the firing member therethrough. The anvil further comprises an anvil cap welded to the anvil body, wherein the anvil cap comprises a welded portion and a non-welded portion, wherein the non-welded portion comprises a non-welded width, and wherein the non-welded width is less than or equal to about 105% of the second width.

Example 25 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 24, wherein the non-welded portion comprises a first non-welded portion configured to be received within the second portion of the longitudinal slot and a second non-welded portion comprising alignment surfaces configured to align the anvil cap to the anvil body for welding.

Example 26 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 25, wherein the tissue-facing surface defines a first plane, and wherein the alignment surfaces define a second plane at least substantially parallel to the first plane.

Example 27 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 24, 25, or 26, wherein the welded portion is flared with respect to the non-welded portion.

Example 28 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 24, 25, 26, or 27, wherein the welded portion comprises welded, angular surfaces corresponding to angular surfaces of the anvil body. Example 29 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 24, 25, 26, 27, or 28, wherein the anvil cap comprises a Y-shaped cross-section.

Example 30 - A surgical stapling anvil, comprising an anvil body comprising a longitudinal slot defining a slot axis, wherein the longitudinal slot comprises slot surfaces facing each other, and a tissue-facing surface. The tissue-facing surface comprises a first side and a second side defined by the longitudinal slot, and a plurality of staple-forming pockets arranged in a plurality of longitudinal rows of staple-forming pockets, wherein the plurality of longitudinal rows of staple-forming pockets comprises an inner-most row of staple-forming pockets closest to the longitudinal slot, wherein the inner-most row of staple-forming pockets defines a row axis a first distance from the slot axis and a first outer boundary axis a second distance from the slot axis which is greater than the first distance. The anvil further comprises an anvil cap welded to the anvil body. The anvil cap comprises a welded portion and a non-welded portion comprising an outer-most non-welded region defining a second outer boundary axis positioned a third distance from the slot axis, wherein the third distance is less than the second distance.

Example 31 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 30, wherein the third distance is greater than the first distance.

Example 32 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 30, wherein the third distance is less than the first distance.

Example 33 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 30, 31 , or 32, wherein the anvil cap further comprises alignment surfaces configured to align the anvil cap to the anvil body for welding. Example 34 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 33, wherein the tissue-facing surface defines a first plane, and wherein the alignment surfaces define a second plane at least substantially parallel to the first plane.

Example 35 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 30, 31 , 32, 33, or 34, wherein the welded portion is flared with respect to the non-welded portion.

Example 36 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 30, 31 , 32, 33, 34, or 35, wherein the welded portion comprises welded, angular surfaces corresponding to angular surfaces of the anvil body.

Example 37 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 30, 31 , 32, 33, 34, 35, or 36, wherein the anvil cap comprises a Y-shaped cross-section.

Example 38 - An anvil for use with a surgical instrument, wherein the anvil comprises a first anvil member comprising a tissue-facing surface defining a datum plane and a plurality of staple forming pockets defined in the tissue-facing surface. The anvil further comprises a second anvil member welded to the first anvil member by at least one weld. The first anvil member and the second anvil member comprise a first mating region defining a first plane which is at least substantially parallel to the datum plane, a second mating region defining a second plane which is at least substantially perpendicular to the datum plane, and a third mating region defining a third plane which is angled relative to the datum plane, wherein the first anvil member and the second anvil member are welded by the at least one weld at the third mating region.

Example 39 - The anvil of Example 38, wherein the third mating region comprises a length, and wherein the at least one weld comprises a weld penetration depth which is at least about equal to the length.

Example 40 - The anvil of Example 39, wherein the weld penetration depth is greater than the length.

Example 41 - The anvil of Examples 38, 39, or 40, wherein the first mating region comprises alignment surfaces configured to align the first anvil member and the second anvil member for welding.

Example 42 - The anvil of Examples 38, 39, 40, or 41 , wherein the second anvil member comprises a Y-shaped cross-section.

Example 43 - The anvil of Examples 38, 39, 40, 41 , or 42, wherein the at least one weld comprises a laser weld.

Example 44 - A surgical stapling anvil comprising an anvil body comprising a longitudinal slot configured to receive a firing member therethrough and a tissue-facing surface comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets defined therein. The anvil further comprises an anvil cap and a plurality of welds welding the anvil cap and the anvil body together, the welds comprise a shallow-welded zone comprising a first weld depth and a deep-welded zone comprising a second weld depth which is different than the first weld depth, wherein the shallow-welded zone and the deep-welded zone are configured to increase the net weld depth of the plurality of welds.

Example 45 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 44, wherein the anvil cap and the anvil body comprise corresponding alignment features configured to aid in aligning the anvil body and the anvil cap for welding.

Example 46 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 45, wherein the corresponding alignment features comprise a first alignment feature on a first side of the longitudinal slot positioned a first distance from the tissue-facing surface and a second alignment feature on a second side of the longitudinal slot positioned a second distance from the tissue-facing surface, and wherein the first distance and the second distance are different.

Example 47 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 44, 45, or 46, wherein the deep-welded zone comprises a first longitudinal length, wherein the shallow-welded zone comprises a second longitudinal length, and wherein the first longitudinal length and the second longitudinal length are different.

Example 48 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 44, 45, 46, or 47, wherein the deep-welded zone comprises a first longitudinal length, wherein the shallow-welded zone comprises a second longitudinal length, and wherein the first longitudinal length and the second longitudinal length overlap each other along a length of the surgical stapling anvil.

Example 49 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 44, 45, 46, 47, or 48, wherein the deep-welded zone comprises a welder access region.

Example 50 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 49, wherein the welder access region comprises a filler weld.

Example 51 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, or 50, wherein the shallow-welded zone comprises a first stiffness, wherein the deep-welded zone comprises a second stiffness, and wherein the first stiffness and the second stiffness are different.

Example 52 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, or 51 , wherein the anvil body and the anvil cap are manufactured using a metal injection molding process. Example 53 - A surgical stapling anvil comprising a first anvil member comprising a longitudinal slot configured to receive a firing member therethrough, a tissue-facing surface comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets defined therein, and an upper anvil surface, wherein the upper anvil surface comprises an aperture defining an edge of the first anvil member. The anvil further comprises a second anvil member and a weld configuration welding the first anvil member and the second anvil member together. The weld configuration comprises a first weld comprising a first weld depth comprising a first weld root, wherein the first weld depth is defined as the distance between the edge and the first weld root, and a second weld comprising a second weld depth comprising a second weld root, wherein the second weld depth is defined as

the distance between the edge and the second weld root, wherein the second weld depth and the first weld depth are different, and wherein the first weld and the second weld are configured to increase the net weld depth of the weld configuration.

Example 54 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 53, wherein the first anvil member and the second anvil member comprise corresponding alignment features configured to aid in aligning the first anvil member and the second anvil member for welding.

Example 55 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 54, wherein the corresponding alignment features comprise a first alignment feature on a first side of the longitudinal slot positioned a first distance from the tissue-facing surface and a second alignment feature on a second side of the longitudinal slot positioned a second distance from the tissue-facing surface, and wherein the first distance and the second distance are different.

Example 56 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 53, 54, or 55, wherein the first weld comprises a first longitudinal length, wherein the second weld comprises a second longitudinal length, and wherein the first longitudinal length and the second longitudinal length are different. Example 57 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 53, 54, 55, or 56, wherein the first weld comprises a first longitudinal length, wherein the second weld comprises a second longitudinal length, and wherein the first longitudinal length and the second longitudinal length overlap each other along a length of the surgical stapling anvil.

Example 58 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 53, 54, 55, 56, or 57, further comprising a filler weld positioned on the first weld.

Example 59 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, or 58, further comprising a first stiffness along the first weld and a second stiffness along the second weld, wherein the first stiffness and the second stiffness are different.

Example 60 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, or 59, wherein the first anvil member and the second anvil member are manufactured using a metal injection molding process.

Example 61 - A surgical stapling anvil comprising an anvil body comprising a tissue-facing surface comprising a plurality of staple-forming pockets, and an interlocking aperture. The anvil further comprises an anvil cap, wherein the anvil body and the anvil cap are welded together, and wherein the anvil cap comprises an interlocking feature configured to be receive within the interlocking aperture.

Example 62 - The surgical stapling anvil of Example 61 , wherein the anvil body further comprises a longitudinal slot configured to receive a firing member of a surgical instrument

therethrough, wherein the longitudinal slot defines a longitudinal axis, and wherein the anvil body and the anvil cap can only be assembled along the longitudinal axis.

Example 63 - The surgical stapling anvil of Examples 61 or 62, wherein the anvil body and the anvil cap are manufactured using a metal injection molding process.

Example 64 - A surgical stapling assembly comprising a shaft defining a shaft axis, a first jaw comprising a staple cartridge channel, a staple cartridge comprising a plurality of staples removably stored therein, and an anvil configured to deform the staples. The anvil comprises a tissue-facing surface, a plurality of staple-forming pockets defined in the tissue-facing surface, and a longitudinal slot. The anvil further comprises a firing member comprising a body portion comprising a first lateral side and a second lateral side, a cutting member, a channel-engaging portion configured to slidably engage the first jaw as the firing member moves through a staple-firing stroke, and an anvil-engaging portion configured to slidably engage the anvil as the firing member moves through a staple-firing stroke, wherein the anvil-engaging portion comprises lateral portions extending from the body portion, wherein the lateral portions define an anvil-engaging portion axis that is angled relative to the shaft axis, wherein the lateral portions comprise a longitudinal length and a vertical thickness, and wherein the longitudinal length and the vertical thickness comprise a ratio between about 2.5:1 and about 20:1 .

Example 65 - The surgical stapling assembly of Example 64, wherein the ratio is between about 5: 1 and about 10:1 .

Example 66 - The surgical stapling assembly of Example 64, wherein the ratio is about 5:1 . Example 67 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 64, 65, or 66, wherein each lateral portion and body portion comprise a fillet therebetween.

Example 68 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 64, 65, 66, or 67, wherein the lateral portions comprise rounded outer ends.

Example 69 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 64, 65, 66, 67, or 68, wherein the anvil-engaging portion comprises a planar upper surface.

Example 70 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, or 69, wherein each lateral portion comprises a rounded leading edge.

Example 71 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, or 70, wherein the anvil-engaging portion axis is angled at about one degree relative to the shaft axis.

Example 72 - A surgical stapling assembly comprising a shaft defining a shaft axis, a first jaw comprising a staple cartridge channel, a staple cartridge comprising a plurality of staples removably stored therein, and a second jaw comprising an anvil, wherein the anvil is configured to deform the staples. The anvil comprises a tissue-facing surface, a plurality of staple-forming pockets defined in the tissue-facing surface, and a longitudinal slot. The stapling assembly further comprises a firing member comprising a vertically extending body portion comprising two lateral sides, a first jaw engagement member configured to slidably engage the first jaw as the firing member moves through a staple-firing stroke, and a second jaw engagement member extending laterally from each lateral side of the body portion, wherein the second jaw engagement member is oriented at an angle relative to the shaft axis, wherein the second jaw engagement member is configured to slidably engage the second jaw as the firing member moves through the staple-firing stroke. The second jaw engagement member comprises a vertical thickness and a lateral width defined as the distance between the body portion and an outer edge of the second jaw engagement member, and wherein the vertical thickness and the lateral width comprise a ratio between about 1 :2 and about 1 :1 .

Example 73 - The surgical stapling assembly of Example 72, wherein the ratio is about 1 :1 . Example 74 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 72 or 73, wherein the second jaw engagement member and the body portion comprise a fillet therebetween.

Example 75 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 72, 73, or 74, wherein the second jaw engagement member comprises rounded outer ends.

Example 76 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 72, 73, 74, or 75, wherein the second jaw engagement member comprises a planar upper surface.

Example 77 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 72, 73, 74, 75, or 76, wherein the second jaw engagement member comprises rounded leading edges.

Example 78 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, or 77, wherein the second jaw engagement member is oriented at an angle of about one degree relative to the shaft axis.

Example 79 - A surgical stapling assembly comprising a shaft defining a shaft axis, a first jaw comprising a staple cartridge channel, a staple cartridge comprising a plurality of staples removably stored therein, and a second jaw comprising an anvil, wherein the anvil is configured to deform the staples. The anvil comprises a tissue-facing surface, a plurality of staple-forming pockets defined in the tissue-facing surface, and a longitudinal slot. The stapling assembly further comprises a firing member comprising a body portion comprising a first lateral side and a second lateral side, a cutting member, a first jaw-coupling member configured to slidably engage the first jaw as the firing member moves through a staple-firing stroke, and a second jaw-coupling member configured to slidably engage the anvil as the firing member moves through a staple-firing stroke, wherein the second jaw-coupling member comprises lateral portions extending from the first lateral side and the second lateral side and defining a planar upper surface, wherein the second jaw-coupling member is angled relative to the shaft axis, wherein the lateral portions and the lateral sides comprise fillets therebetween, and wherein the lateral portions comprise rounded outer ends.

Example 80 - The surgical stapling assembly of Example 79, wherein each lateral portion comprises a rounded leading edge.

Example 81 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 79 or 80, wherein the longitudinal slot comprises rounded slot edges defining an opening of the longitudinal slot, and wherein the fillets are configured to slidably engage the rounded slot edges.

Example 82 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 79, 80, or 81 , wherein the

longitudinal slot comprises rounded, lateral slot portions, and wherein the rounded outer ends are configured to slidably engage the corresponding rounded slot portions.

Example 83 - The surgical stapling assembly of Examples 79, 80, 81 , or 82, wherein the second jaw-coupling member is angled at about one degree relative to the shaft axis.

Example 84 - A surgical instrument assembly comprising a firing member comprising an anvil-camming portion comprising a first stiffness, a staple cartridge comprising a plurality of staples configured to be ejected from the staple cartridge by the firing member, and an anvil. The anvil comprises a tissue-facing surface comprising a plurality of staple forming pockets configured to deform the staples, and an anvil ledge configured to be engaged by the anvil-camming portion of the firing member during a firing stroke, wherein the anvil ledge comprises a second stiffness, and wherein the second stiffness is substantially equal to the first stiffness such that the deflection of the anvil ledge would be substantially equal to the deflection of the anvil-camming portion.

Example 85 - The surgical instrument assembly of Example 84, further comprising means for balancing the first stiffness and the second stiffness.

Example 86 - The surgical instrument assembly of Example 85, wherein the means comprises an adjustment to at least one of a first geometry of the anvil-camming portion and a second geometry of the anvil ledge to provide substantially similar stiffnesses.

Example 87 - The surgical instrument assembly of Examples 85 or 86, wherein the means further comprises adjusting at least one of a first height of the anvil-camming portion and a second height of the anvil ledge to provide substantially similar stiffnesses.

Example 88 - The surgical instrument assembly of Examples 85, 86, or 87, wherein the means comprises substantially equating the yield strengths of the anvil-camming portion and the anvil ledge.

Example 89 - The surgical instrument assembly of Examples 85, 86, 87, or 88, wherein the means comprises substantially equating the hardnesses of the anvil-camming portion and the anvil ledge.

[0293] Many of the surgical instrument systems described herein are motivated by an electric motor; however, the surgical instrument systems described herein can be motivated in any suitable manner. In various instances, the surgical instrument systems described herein can be motivated by a manually-operated trigger, for example. In certain instances, the motors disclosed herein may comprise a portion or portions of a robotically controlled system.

Moreover, any of the end effectors and/or tool assemblies disclosed herein can be utilized with a robotic surgical instrument system. U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/1 18,241 , entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENTS WITH ROTATABLE STAPLE DEPLOYMENT ARRANGEMENTS, now U.S. Patent No. 9,072,535, for example, discloses several examples of a robotic surgical instrument system in greater detail.

[0294] The surgical instrument systems described herein have been described in connection with the deployment and deformation of staples; however, the embodiments described herein are not so limited. Various embodiments are envisioned which deploy fasteners other than staples, such as clamps or tacks, for example. Moreover, various embodiments are envisioned which utilize any suitable means for sealing tissue. For instance, an end effector in accordance with various embodiments can comprise electrodes configured to heat and seal the tissue. Also, for instance, an end effector in accordance with certain embodiments can apply vibrational energy to seal the tissue.

[0295] The entire disclosures of:

U.S. Patent No. 5,403,312, entitled ELECTROSURGICAL HEMOSTATIC DEVICE, which issued on April 4, 1995;

U.S. Patent No. 7,000,818, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENT HAVING SEPARATE DISTINCT CLOSING AND FIRING SYSTEMS, which issued on February 21 , 2006;

U.S. Patent No. 7,422,139, entitled MOTOR-DRIVEN SURGICAL CUTTING AND FASTENING INSTRUMENT WITH TACTILE POSITION FEEDBACK, which issued on

September 9, 2008;

U.S. Patent No. 7,464,849, entitled ELECTRO-MECHANICAL SURGICAL

INSTRUMENT WITH CLOSURE SYSTEM AND ANVIL ALIGNMENT COMPONENTS, which issued on December 16, 2008;

U.S. Patent No. 7,670,334, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT HAVING AN

ARTICULATING END EFFECTOR, which issued on March 2, 2010;

U.S. Patent No. 7,753,245, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENTS, which issued on July 13, 2010;

U.S. Patent No. 8,393,514, entitled SELECTIVELY ORIENTABLE IMPLANTABLE FASTENER CARTRIDGE, which issued on March 12, 2013;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 1 1/343,803, entitled SURGICAL INSTRUMENT HAVING RECORDING CAPABILITIES; now U.S. Patent No. 7,845,537;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 12/031 ,573, entitled SURGICAL CUTTING AND FASTENING INSTRUMENT HAVING RF ELECTRODES, filed February 14, 2008;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 12/031 ,873, entitled END EFFECTORS FOR A SURGICAL CUTTING AND STAPLING INSTRUMENT, filed February 15, 2008, now U.S. Patent No. 7,980,443;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 12/235,782, entitled MOTOR-DRIVEN SURGICAL CUTTING INSTRUMENT, now U.S. Patent No. 8,210,41 1 ;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 12/249,1 17, entitled POWERED SURGICAL CUTTING AND STAPLING APPARATUS WITH MANUALLY RETRACTABLE FIRING SYSTEM, now U.S. Patent No. 8,608,045;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 12/647, 100, entitled MOTOR-DRIVEN SURGICAL CUTTING INSTRUMENT WITH ELECTRIC ACTUATOR DIRECTIONAL CONTROL ASSEMBLY, filed December 24, 2009; now U.S. Patent No. 8,220,688;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 12/893,461 , entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE, filed September 29, 2012, now U.S. Patent No. 8,733,613;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/036,647, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENT, filed February 28, 201 1 , now U.S. Patent No. 8,561 ,870;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/1 18,241 , entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENTS WITH ROTATABLE STAPLE DEPLOYMENT ARRANGEMENTS, now U.S. Patent No. 9,072,535;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/524,049, entitled ARTICULATABLE SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPRISING A FIRING DRIVE, filed on June 15, 2012; now U.S. Patent No. 9, 101 ,358;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/800,025, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE TISSUE THICKNESS SENSOR SYSTEM, filed on March 13, 2013, now U.S. Patent No. 9,345,481 ;

U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 13/800,067, entitled STAPLE CARTRIDGE TISSUE THICKNESS SENSOR SYSTEM, filed on March 13, 2013, now U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2014/0263552;

U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2007/0175955, entitled SURGICAL CUTTING AND FASTENING INSTRUMENT WITH CLOSURE TRIGGER LOCKING MECHANISM, filed January 31 , 2006; and

U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2010/0264194, entitled SURGICAL STAPLING INSTRUMENT WITH AN ARTICULATABLE END EFFECTOR, filed April 22, 2010, now U.S. Patent No. 8,308,040, are hereby incorporated by reference herein.

[0296] Although various devices have been described herein in connection with certain embodiments, modifications and variations to those embodiments may be implemented.

Particular features, structures, or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner in one or more embodiments. Thus, the particular features, structures, or characteristics illustrated or described in connection with one embodiment may be combined in whole or in part, with the features, structures or characteristics of one ore more other embodiments without limitation. Also, where materials are disclosed for certain components, other materials may be used. Furthermore, according to various embodiments, a single component may be replaced by multiple components, and multiple components may be replaced by a single component, to perform a given function or functions. The foregoing description and following claims are intended to cover all such modification and variations.

[0297] The devices disclosed herein can be designed to be disposed of after a single use, or they can be designed to be used multiple times. In either case, however, a device can be reconditioned for reuse after at least one use. Reconditioning can include any combination of the steps including, but not limited to, the disassembly of the device, followed by cleaning or replacement of particular pieces of the device, and subsequent reassembly of the device. In particular, a reconditioning facility and/or surgical team can disassemble a device and, after cleaning and/or replacing particular parts of the device, the device can be reassembled for subsequent use. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that reconditioning of a device can utilize a variety of techniques for disassembly, cleaning/replacement, and reassembly. Use of such techniques, and the resulting reconditioned device, are all within the scope of the present application.

[0298] The devices disclosed herein may be processed before surgery. First, a new or used instrument may be obtained and, when necessary, cleaned. The instrument may then be sterilized. In one sterilization technique, the instrument is placed in a closed and sealed container, such as a plastic or TYVEK bag. The container and instrument may then be placed in a field of radiation that can penetrate the container, such as gamma radiation, x-rays, and/or high-energy electrons. The radiation may kill bacteria on the instrument and in the container.

The sterilized instrument may then be stored in the sterile container. The sealed container may keep the instrument sterile until it is opened in a medical facility. A device may also be sterilized using any other technique known in the art, including but not limited to beta radiation, gamma radiation, ethylene oxide, plasma peroxide, and/or steam.

[0299] While this invention has been described as having exemplary designs, the present invention may be further modified within the spirit and scope of the disclosure. This application is therefore intended to cover any variations, uses, or adaptations of the invention using its general principles.

[0300] Any patent, publication, or other disclosure material, in whole or in part, that is said to be incorporated by reference herein is incorporated herein only to the extent that the incorporated materials do not conflict with existing definitions, statements, or other disclosure material set forth in this disclosure. As such, and to the extent necessary, the disclosure as explicitly set forth herein supersedes any conflicting material incorporated herein by reference. Any material, or portion thereof, that is said to be incorporated by reference herein, but which conflicts with existing definitions, statements, or other disclosure material set forth herein will only be incorporated to the extent that no conflict arises between that incorporated material and the existing disclosure material.