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1. WO2017136575 - COMPOSITIONS OF INFLUENZA HEMAGGLUTININ WITH HETEROLOGOUS EPITOPES AND/OR ALTERED MATURATION CLEAVAGE SITES

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COMPOSITIONS OF INFLUENZA HEMAGGLUTININ WITH HETEROLOGOUS EPITOPES AND/OR ALTERED MATURATION CLEAVAGE SITES

Cross -Reference to Related Applications

[0001] This application claims priority from U.S. provisional application No. 62/290,894, filed February 3, 2016, entitled "Compositions of Influenza Hemagglutinin with Heterologous Epitopes and/or Altered Maturation Cleavage Sites and Methods of Use Thereof," the contents of which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.

Incorporation by Reference of Sequence Listing

[0002] The present application is being filed along with a Sequence Listing in electronic format. The Sequence Listing is provided as a file entitled 758252000140SeqList.TXT, created 30 January 2017, size: 173,061 bytes. The information in the electronic format of the Sequence Listing is incorporated by reference in its entirety.

Technical Field

[0003] This invention is in the field of immunology and virology. More particularly it relates to compositions of recombinant influenza hemagglutinin (HA) proteins with altered and heterologous epitopes and/or altered maturation cleavage sites.1

Background Art

[0004] Influenza, commonly known as "the flu", is an infectious respiratory disease caused by infection of human or zoonotic influenza viruses. Outbreaks of influenza occur annually during the cold months of each year, commonly known as "flu season". These annual epidemics cause 3-5 million cases of severe illness and up to 500,000 deaths worldwide, although most symptoms

1 The following abbreviations are applicable. HA, hemagglutinin; NA, neuraminidase; NAbs, neutralizing antibodies; bNAbs, broadly neutralizing antibodies; TEV, tobacco etch virus; DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid; cDNA,

complementary DNA; RNA, ribonucleic acid; kb, kilobase; kDa, kilo Dalton; CHO cells, Chinese hamster ovary cells; HEK 293 cells, human embryonic kidney 293 cells; VLP, virus-like particle; BEVS, baculovirus expression vector system; AcNPV, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus; BmNPV, Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus; TIPS, titerless infected-cells preservation and scale-up; BIIC, baculovirus infected insect cells; PCR, polymerase chain reaction; FBS, fetal bovine serum; PDB, Protein Data Bank which is on the World Wide Web at

(rcsb.org/pdb/home/home. do); MOI, multiplicity of infection; MCS, maturation cleavage site; HPAI, high pathogenic avian influenza; HI, HA inhibition; WT, wild type; TIV, trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines; PBS, phosphate buffered saline.

of influenza infections are mild (World Health Organization: Influenza (Seasonal) on the World Wide Web at who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs211/en/). Each century, there are several influenza pandemics when influenza viruses infect a large proportion of human population and inflict significant morbidity and mortality around the world. The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic that killed 3 to 5 percent of the world's population is the most deadly pandemic in recorded history.

Current Strategies to Elicit Stem Domain Reactive Antibodies

[0005] Elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against all influenza viruses has been the ultimate goal of flu vaccine design. Majority of the isolated bNAbs recognize conserved epitopes in the HA stem domain. However, antibodies elicited by natural influenza virus infection or current flu vaccines mostly recognize the antigenic sites that surround the receptor binding site in the HA globular head domain due to the immunodominance of these antigenic sites. These antibodies are generally strain- specific as a result of the high variability of these antigenic sites among influenza virus strains. Thus current flu vaccines do not induce universal immunity against flu viruses.

[0006] Hemagglutinin (HA) is an integral membrane glycoprotein. It is the most abundant protein in influenza virus lipid bilayer envelope. About 500 molecules of HA are estimated on the surface of a virion. HA is the only protein required for adsorption and penetration of virus into host cells. It binds to host cell receptors and enables fusion between the virion lipid envelope and the host cell membrane. Through its ability to bind host cell receptors, HA determines the host range of an influenza strain.

[0007] HA is synthesized as a single chain precursor named HAO in the endoplasmic reticulum (Stevens, J., et ah, Science (2006) 312:404-410). The HAO precursor has a signal peptide at its N-terminus and a membrane anchor sequence at its C-terminus. The N-terminal signal peptide is removed during the process when HA is transported across and anchored into the host cell membrane. HA is assembled into trimers of identical subunits in the endoplasmic reticulum and is then exported to the cell surface via the Golgi network. HAO is cleaved at the C-terminal end of the maturation cleavage site (MCS) by specific host trypsin-like protease and converts to the mature form consisting of two disulfide-bond linked polypeptides, HAl and HA2. HAl is the larger N-terminal portion and HA2 is the smaller C-terminal portion of HAO. HA2 has the transmembrane region with a short C-terminal intracellular tail and anchors the HA to the membrane. Each mature HA has a total molecular weight of about 70 kDa with HAl about

45 kDa and HA2 about 25 kDa. The atomic structures of the extracellular portion of HAs from many influenza strains have been determined. The structural model of a mature HA is shown in Figure 1. All HAs, either as HAO or the mature form, have the same overall trimeric structure with a globular head on a stem. Each HA monomer is anchored on membrane by a single C-terminal transmembrane region with a short hydrophilic cytoplasmic tail.

[0008] The globular head domain is made entirely of the HA1 and contains

immunodominant epitopes. The stem domain is mostly made of the HA2 and contains conserved regions that are subdominant immunogenically. The globular head domain has an eight- stranded β-sheet structure at its core with surface loops and helices. The membrane proximal stem domain is composed of left-handed superhelix of a triple coiled-coil structure of residues from both HA1 and HA2. Each HA monomer has multiple glycosylation sites with a total carbohydrate of about 13 kDa of molecular weight or 19% of the total HA molecular weight. Most glycosylation is in the stem domain near the membrane surface. HA is also modified by palmitoylation of cysteine residues on the cytoplasmic tail (Veit, M., et al, J. Virol (1991) 65:2491-2500).

[0009] To circumvent the immunodominance of the globular head domain, immunogens have been designed based on the HA stem domain without the globular head domain (headless HAs). These attempts have been largely unsuccessful due to the difficulty of production of such molecules with proper tertiary structure (Krammer, F. and Palese, P. Curr Opin Virol (2013) 3:521-530; Eckert, D. M., and Kay, M. S., PNAS (2010) 107: 13563-13564). HA2 by itself has been expressed in E. coli in soluble form that folds into its most stable post-fusion low-pH-induced conformation (Chen, J., et al, PNAS (1995) 92: 12205-12209). By incorporating designed mutations to destabilize the low pH conformation of HA2, another HA2 construct (HA6) based on H3 HA was expressed in E. coli and refolded into the desired neutral pH pre-fusion conformation (Bommakanti, G., et al, PNAS (2010) 107: 13701-13706). HA6 was highly immunogenic in mice and protected mice against the infection by homologous influenza A viruses. However, sera from HA6 immunized mice failed to neutralize virus in vitro, which could be due to limitation of the assay that only detect virus-neutralizing activity of the antibodies recognizing the globular head domain. Another "headless" HA stem domain construct with the HA2 and the region of HA1 in the stem domain has been described (Steel, J., et al, mBio (2010) l:e00018-10). This immunogen protected mice against homologous influenza challenge and elicited antisera cross-reactive to heterologous HAs from within the same group. As with HA6, the antisera did not show

neutralizing activity in vitro. These designs are all based on protein minimization by eliminating immunodominant regions.

[0010] Recently, through structure-based rational design and reiterative bNAb selection of construct libraries, stable trimeric HI HA stem-only immunogens (headless mini-HAs) were made (Impagliazzo, A., et al, Science (2015) 349: 1301-1306; Yassing, H., M., et al, Nat Med (2015) 21: 1065-1070; Patent application WO2014/191435_Al). These stem-only mini-HA immunogens elicited expected antibodies against HA stem domain. Mice and ferrets immunized with these mini-HA immunogens were protected from lethal challenge of highly pathogenic H5 virus. In addition, a mini-HA immunogen elicited H5 neutralizing antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys. These mini-HA immunogens were selected for their binding to specific bNAbs. The lengthy reiterative bNAb selection process needs to be repeated for a different type of bNAbs. Although conformations of the bNAb epitopes were preserved in these mini-HA immunogens, the overall structures were different from the stem domain of native HA. Due to these structural changes, it is unlikely these headless mini-HA immunogens can be assembled into influenza viruses or influenza virus-like particles (VLPs). In addition, these headless mini-HA immunogens do not have the receptor binding site for host cell binding.

[0011] Chimeric HAs have been designed to direct the host immune response to the stem domain. Most neutralizing antibodies induced by pandemic H1N1 infection were broadly cross-reactive against epitopes in the HA stem domain and globular head domain of multiple influenza strains (Wrammert, J., et al, J. Exp Med (2011) 208: 181-193). Immunization with HA derived from H5N1 influenza strains (a group 1 HA) that is not circulating in humans substantially increases HA stem-specific responses to group 1 circulating seasonal strains (Ellebedy, A. H., et al., PNAS (2014) 111: 13133-13138; Nachbagauer, R., et al., J Virol (2014) 88: 13260-13268; Whittle, J. R. R., et al, J. Virol (2014) 88:4047-4057). After each emergence of pandemic influenza virus strains in 1957, 1968, and 2009, existing seasonal virus strains were replaced in the human population by the novel pandemic strains.

[0012] It is hypothesized that exposure to new pandemic influenza virus strains with divergent globular head domains lead to affinity matured memory responses to the conserved epitopes in the stem domains (Palese, P. and Wang, T. T., mBio (2011) 2:e00150-l l). In support of this hypothesis, engineered recombinant chimeric HA of H6, H9, or H5 globular head domain and HI stem domain generated high titer stem-specific neutralizing antibodies (Pica, N., et al, PNAS (2012) 109:2573-2578; Krammer, F., et al, J. Virol (2013) 87:6542-6550). In these cases,

the globular head domain of HI HA was replaced by the globular head domain of H6, H9, or H5 from the same group 1 HA to which most of the human population is naive. These replacements were made by replacing the HI HA sequence between cysteine 52 and cysteine 277 of HA1 with the corresponding sequence of H6, H9, or H5. Cysteine 52 and cysteine 277 form a disulfide bond in the hinge region between the globular head domain and the stem domain. Similar chimeric HAs were made with H3 stem domain to develop vaccines for group 2 influenza strains (Krammer, F., et al, J. Virol (2014) 88:2340-2343; Margine, I., et al, J. Virol (2013) 87: 10435-10446).

Immunizing animals with these chimeric HAs induced stem-specific antibodies with broad neutralizing activity against each group of viruses. Human population has preexisting immunity to circulating HI (group 1), H3 (group 2), and influenza B virus strains. Vaccination with a chimeric HA boosted antibody levels against the stem domains that are common to HAs of the circulating strains and the chimeric HA. Only a primary response was induced against the novel globular head domain on the chimeric HA to which humans are naive. Subsequent boost with a second chimeric HA that possesses the same stem domain but a different head domain further increased stem-specific antibody levels. The results suggest changing the host exposure to the

immunodominant epitopes in the globular head domain can increase the broadly protective immune responses against the immunosubdominant epitopes in the stem domain.

[0013] The six-amino-acid loop of antigenic Site B of A/WSN/33(H1N1) hemagglutinin can be replaced by the homologous antigenic Site B residues of HAs from A/Japan/57(H2N2) and A/Hong Kong/8/68(H3N2) (Li, S., et al, J. Virol (1992) 66: 399-404). These replacements do not interfere with the receptor binding function of HA. Recombinant influenza viruses with these chimeric HAs were replicated in MDCK (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Epithelial Cells) cell culture. Viruses with chimeric HAs of A/WSN/33(H1N1) and A/Hong Kong/8/68(H3N2) induced antibodies against both A/WSN/33(H1N1) and A/Hong Kong/8/68 (H3N2). These results suggest that the immunodominant antigenic sites of a HA can be replaced by the homologous

corresponding immunodominant antigenic sites of other HAs from different strains. These replacements change the antigenic specificity of the resulting chimeric HAs.

[0014] In the foregoing paragraphs, therefore, the immunodominant epitopes in one influenza strain were replaced by the homologous immunodominant epitopes from another strain.

[0015] Another strategy is to dampen the immunodominant epitopes and refocus the host immune response towards the stem domain. The immunodominant antigenic sites in the globular head domain can be shielded by introducing additional glycosylation sites for hyperglycosylation (Eggink, D., et al, J. Virol (2014) 88:699-704, Patent application US2014/0004149_A1). The hyperglycosylation in globular head domain did not change the binding affinity of stem-reactive antibodies. Immunization of mice with the hyperglycosylated HA induced high titers of stem-reactive antibodies and protection against morbidity and mortality upon challenge with distinct seasonal viruses. Patent application US2013/0315929_A1 disclosed another method to dampen the immunodominant epitopes in the globular head domain by replacing some residues of those epitopes with other amino acids with less likelihood of being part of an epitope. The results suggest shielding immunodominant epitopes in the globular head domain can increase the broadly protective immune responses against the immunosubdominant epitopes in the stem domain.

HA as carrier to present foreign epitopes

[0016] Influenza HA has been used as a carrier for epitopes of V3-loop of HIV-1 envelope protein. Insertion of immunodominant epitope peptides of 12 to 22 residues in length from HIV-1 envelope protein gpl20 to the HA immunodominant antigenic site, either the Site A or Site B, produced chimeric HAs with individual HIV-1 epitope in the globular head domain. No residues of Site A and Site B were removed. The immunodominant HIV-1 epitopes were inserted into the sites. The chimeric HAs induced immune responses to the HIV-1 V3-loop epitope in animals (Kalyan, N. K., et al, Vaccine (1994) 12:753-760; US Patent U.S. 5,591,823_A; Li, S., et al, J. Virol (1993) 67:6659-6666). The immunogenicity of the inserted epitopes appeared to be enhanced by HA since a very low dose of a chimeric HA protein was sufficient to induce antibodies specific to the inserted epitope. These results suggest that immunodominant foreign epitopes from proteins other than HA can be inserted to the immunodominant antigenic sites of HA. These chimeric HA molecules with inserted foreign immunodominant epitopes can induce immune responses to the inserted foreign immunodominant epitopes.

Disclosure of the Invention

[0017] This invention is directed to modified forms of influenza hemagglutinin protein, to vaccines, virus-like particles, and viruses that contain it as well as recombinant methods and materials for its production. In general, these modifications include replacement of the immunodominant regions of the globular head domain of HA protein with alternative epitopes for generating antibodies and/or modification of the maturation cleavage site (MCS) in the stem domain of the HA protein. Cleavage of HA0 between MCS and the fusion peptide to generate the free N-terminus of HA2 is essential for cell entry. By altering the MCS so as to prevent its cleavage by animal proteases, a virus where the MCS has already been cleaved permits infection of host cells where the virus may multiply, but its progeny are uninfective. Thus, the presence of any epitopes including those occupying the immunodominant sites is amplified without further infection of the host by the progeny viruses.

[0018] In one aspect, the invention is directed to a flu vaccine which comprises a modified HA or a virus or virus-like particle which contains it, wherein an immunodominant region of the HA protein contains a conserved alternative epitope of the same influenza strain or another influenza strain inserted into this region. This provides a more successful immunogenic form of the inserted alternative epitope that is immunosubdominant in its native position. Alternative epitopes are those not derived from the globular head domain of other HAs. Typically they are from the HA stem domains or from non-HA influenza proteins, such as M2.

[0019] In another aspect, the invention is directed to a modified influenza virus (which could also be used as a vaccine) which has been modified to contain an MCS that is not cleaved by animal proteases. As noted above, this permits amplification of the virus without engendering infective forms thereof. Such a virus can be further modified by replacing one or more

immunodominant regions with an alternative or heterologous epitope which may be an influenza epitope or a foreign epitope including, for example, epitopes characteristic of other viruses, bacteria or tumor associated antigens.

[0020] In still other aspects, the invention is directed to recombinant materials and methods for preparing the proteins, viruses or virus-like particles of the modified HA protein and methods to generate antibodies using these proteins, virus-like particles or modified viruses.

Brief Description of the Drawings

[0021] Figure 1 illustrates the X-ray crystal structure of the extracellular portion of a mature HA of A/California/07/2009, a swine origin influenza A virus H1N1 strain (PDB:3LZG). This structure is used to guide the construct designs in this invention. The peptide sequence of this HA is used for making the parental wild type (WT) HI HA construct. Figure 1A shows HA trimer with one HA monomer in ribbon drawing and the other two in backbone drawing. The orientation with respect to the membrane, the position of the globular head domain, and the stem domain are indicated. HA1 is shown as light shaded ribbon and HA2 is shown as dark shaded

ribbon. Figure IB shows the single HA monomer with the positions of HAl and HA2, as well the N- and C-termini of HAl and HA2. The fusion peptide is circled.

[0022] Figure 2 illustrates the approximate positions of the immunodominant antigenic sites of H3 HA mapped to the HI HA monomer of A/Calif ornia/07/2009. Figure 2A shows a ribbon drawing as in Figure 1. The H3 HA immunodominant antigenic sites A, B, C, D, and E are shown in dark shades. Figure 2B is the top view of Figure 2A above the globular head domain distal to the membrane.

[0023] Figure 3 illustrates the approximate positions of the immunodominant antigenic sites of HI HA mapped to the HI HA monomer of A/Calif ornia/07/2009. Figure 3A shows a ribbon drawing as in Figure 1. The HI HA immunodominant antigenic sites Cal, Ca2, Cb, Sa, and Sb are shown in dark shades. Figure 3B is the top view of Figure 3A above the globular head domain distal to the membrane. Many of these immunodominant antigenic sites surround the host cell receptor binding site as indicated by an arrow.

[0024] Figure 4 illustrates the schematic design of the HI HA constructs. Figure 4A is a schematic drawing of nucleic acid features of the constructs. Positions of restriction sites for subcloning are labeled. Figure 4B is a schematic drawing of the protein features of the constructs in relative proportion to the nucleic acid shown in Figure 4A. GP67ss represents the GP67 secretion signal (signal peptide) at the N-terminus. HAl represents HA HAl. MCS represents HA maturation cleavage site which is part of HAl. HA2 represents HA HA2. TEV represents TEV cleavage site. Foldon represents foldon sequence. His represents 10-histidine-tag (lOxHis-tag) at the C -terminus.

[0025] Figure 5 illustrates the positions where the heterologous epitopes are placed in the HA globular head domain and where the altered maturation cleavage sites are. The parental construct peptide sequence (WT) is aligned with HA sequences of H3 (A/Aichi/2/1968 H3N2) and HI (A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 H1N1). The amino acid positions of each sequence are labeled on the right based on HA0 numbering with the first residue after signal sequence removal as position 1. The maturation cleavage site (MCS) is indicated by an arrow and a vertical line. The

immunodominant antigenic sites A, B, C, D and E of H3 HA are marked above the H3 sequence. The immunodominant antigenic sites Cal, Ca2, Cb, Sa and Sb of HI HA are marked below the HI sequence. The underlined sequences in WT are replaced by the heterologous epitopes indicated below the sequences. Altered maturation cleavage sites are indicated below the maturation

cleavage site (MCS). The native immunosubdominant antigenic sites for broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), FI6, 1C9, and CR8020, are marked by lines above the sequences, respectively.

[0026] Figure 6 illustrates models of HA monomer with the composite CR8020 epitope placed at the immunodominant antigenic sites of the globular head domain. The HA monomer is shown in a ribbon drawing as in Figure 1. The immunodominant antigenic sites that are replaced by composite CR8020 epitope are shown in dark shade. The original native CR8020 epitopes in the stem domain are also shown in dark shade. Figure 6A shows the model of CR8020Sa4.

Figure 6B shows the model of CR8020Ca.

[0027] Figure 7 shows the expression data of HA constructs described in this invention. Cell culture medium of SF9 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus of the indicated construct was harvested and captured by Ni-NTA resin (Ni pull-down). The Ni-NTA resin was washed with lxPBS to remove unbound proteins. Proteins bound to the Ni-NTA resin were analyzed by SDS-PAGE with Coomassie® staining (Figures 7A, B, C, and D) or anti-His Western blot (Figure 7E). The arrow indicates the full-length HA0.

[0028] Figure 8 shows the purified HA constructs used in this invention. Cell culture medium of SF9 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus of the indicated construct was harvested and captured by Ni-NTA resin (Ni pull-down). The Ni-NTA resin was washed with lxPBS. Bound proteins were eluted with imidazole and analyzed by SDS-PAGE with Coomassie® staining. The arrow indicates the full-length HA0.

Modes of Carrying out the Invention

[0029] As this invention is directed to modifications of HA protein, further description of this protein and its function in addition to that provided above may be helpful.

[0030] Protease cleavage of HA0 is a prerequisite for the infectivity of influenza A viruses. The distribution of these proteases in the host is one of the determinants of tissue tropism and, as such, pathogenicity. Several trypsin-like proteases have been identified in respiratory track and lung that cleave majority of HAs with monobasic maturation cleavage sites (Kido, H., et ah, J. Biol Chem (1992) 267: 13573-13579; Peitsch, C, et al, J. Virol (2014) 88:282-291; Zhirnov, O., P., et ah, J. Virol (2002) 76: 8682-8689). These proteases are serine proteases. One of them is trypsin-like protease Clara, first isolated from rat bronchiolar epithelial Clara cells. Narrow tissue distribution of these proteases that cleave HAO restricts influenza virus infection to the respiratory tracks and lungs in mammals.

[0031] The proteases responsible for HA maturation are not yet well characterized. Like trypsin, these proteases cleave the peptide bond C-terminal to a basic residue such as arginine (R) or lysine (K). The maturation cleavage site (MCS) is located at the C-terminal end of HA1 and cleavage at the C-terminus of MCS is essential for infectivity.

[0032] A polybasic sequence in the maturation cleavage sites of H5 and H7 subtypes leads to cleavage susceptibility by a broader range of cellular proteases such as furin and subtilisin-type proteases, which correlates with broader tissue tropism and higher pathogenicity of these viruses in mammals (Stieneke-Grober, A., et al, EMBO J (1992) 11:2407-2414; Maines, T. R., et al, J. Virol (2005) 79: 11788-11800). Many highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) subtypes are H5 and H7. During HPAI outbreaks in human, reported case-fatality rates are higher than those of pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses (Morens, D. M., et al, Nature (2012) 486:335-340). These polybasic sequences in the MCS also lead to viral replication in multiple organs of avian species, resulting in high mortality in these avian species.

[0033] The HAs of seasonal flu viruses and nonpathogenic avian influenza viruses are cleaved extracellularly by specific proteases in respiratory tract and lung which limit their tissue tropism. On the other hand, the HAs of highly pathogenic viruses are cleaved intracellularly by ubiquitously occurring proteases. These highly pathogenic viruses undergo multiple-cycle replication in various tissues to cause systemic infections (Steinhauer, D. A., Virus. Virol (1999) 258: 1-20; Taubenberger, J. K., PNAS (1998) 95:9713-9715). The 1918 pandemic strain of human influenza virus also utilizes a broad range of cellular proteases and use its neuraminidase (NA) to recruit plasminogen for HA cleavage (Goto, H. and Kawaoka, Y. PNAS (1998) 95: 10224-10228; Chaipan, C, et al, J. Virol (2009) 83:3200-3211).

[0034] Cleavage of HAO generates HA2 with a new free N-terminus which is essential for virion fusion with host cells. The cleaved form is the mature form of HA with full function of receptor binding and membrane fusion. HAO has the ability to bind receptors but does not mediate membrane fusion. Both the precursor and the mature form of HA exist on the surface of virions. Viruses with only HAO have no fusion activity and do not cause infection.

[0035] The N-terminal twelve residues of HA2 is called the "fusion peptide" (Skehel, et al, Biochem Soc Trans (2001) 29:623-626). The fusion peptide has a hydrophobic sequence. In HAO, MCS and the fusion peptide form a surface loop. After cleavage, the newly generated N-terminal fusion peptide inserts into the HA trimer interface. Following binding to host cell receptors, the attached influenza virions are endocytosed by the host cells into endosomes. The fusion potential of mature HA is activated at endosomal pH, between pH 5 and 6 depending on the particular influenza virus strain. Extensive changes in HA structure at low pH result in extrusion of the fusion peptide towards the cell membrane. Insertion of fusion peptide into the host endosomal membrane leads to fusion of the surrounding host endosomal membrane with the viral membrane containing the C-terminal membrane anchor region of HA. Fusion releases the viral RNA segments into the cytoplasm of the host cell to enter into the host cell nucleus, where viral replication occurs.

[0036] HA determines the host range of an influenza virus strain. HA binds to terminal sialic acid of host cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids. HAs from human influenza strains bind almost exclusively to sialyloligosaccharides terminated by SAoc2,6Gal, whereas HA from avian and equine influenza strains bind SAoc2,3Gal. Human has mostly SAoc2,6Gal

sialyloligosaccharides and avian species have mostly SAoc2,3Gal sialyloligosaccharides. As schematically shown in Figure 3, the host receptor binding sites on HA are located in the globular head domain that is exclusively made of HA1. The receptor specificity of influenza virus HA has been well characterized. The amino acid residues responsible for the recognition of SAoc2,6Gal or SAoc2,3Gal have been mapped. It has been shown that a single amino acid residue substitution in the receptor binding pocket changes the receptor binding specificity (Rogers, G. N., et ah, Nature (1983) 304:76-78). Different isolates of 1918 influenza pandemic virus had different receptor binding specificity as a result of a single amino acid substitution in the receptor binding site of HA (Glaser, L., et al., J. Virol (2005) 79: 11533-11536). The strain A/South Carolina/1/18 HA preferentially binds the human cellular receptor SAoc2,6Gal, whereas the strain A/New York/1/18 HA binds both human cellular receptor SAoc2,6Gal and avian cellular receptor SAoc2,3Gal, revealing the dynamic nature of host adaptation of influenza viruses.

[0037] Even though a single mutation in the receptor binding site of HA changes the receptor binding specificity from avian to human, efficient transmission of H5 avian influenza virus strain in human requires several other changes in HA outside the receptor binding site and changes in other influenza proteins (Imai, M., et al., Nature (2012) 486:420-428; Herfst, S., et al., Science (2012) 336: 1534-1541; Chen, L-M., et al, Virol (2012) 422: 105-113; Russell, C. A., et al, Science (2012) 336: 1541-1547). Together with other changes, as few as four amino acid substitutions in H5 HA are sufficient to enable the transmission of mutant avian H5 virus among ferrets through respiratory droplets. In addition to understanding of influenza virus transmission across species, these studies established laboratory procedures to study non-mammalian influenza virus transmission in mammals, which can be used to evaluate universal influenza vaccine candidates.

Description of Anti-Flu Antibodies and Antigenic Sites of HA

[0038] As the most abundant protein of influenza virus lipid bilayer envelope, HA is the major antigen of influenza virus and harbors the primary epitopes for neutralizing antibodies.

Most human anti-flu antibodies are against HA and NA. Sixty percent (60%) of the influenza-reactive antibodies elicited by vaccination react to HA (Wrammert, J., et al, Nature (2008) 453:667-671). Majority of HA-reacting antibodies recognize the antigenic sites that surround the receptor binding site in the globular head domain. Some of these antibodies are virus -neutralizing antibodies. These neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) generally interfere with HA binding to host cells and show HA inhibition (HI) activity. They are generally strain- specific due to the high variability of these antigenic sites, and thus lack the much-desired broad neutralizing activity (Wang, T. T., and Palese, P., Nat Struct Mol Biol (2009) 16:233-234).

[0039] The widespread infection of influenza viruses is the result of the ability of the virus to alter its antigenic properties. The changes of antigenic properties of influenza viruses are the result of the low fidelity replication of the viral genome by the error-prone viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex. The high mutation rate leads to antigenic drift, a gradual change of antigenic properties of HA. Antigenic drift occurs in all types of influenza viruses. Sequence analyses of HA genes show that most of the changes in amino acid sequences are located in the HA1 even though silent nucleic acid sequence changes are spread over the entire HA gene

(Palese, P., and Young, J. F., Science (1982) 215: 1468-1474). HA2 is more conserved than HA1.

[0040] The segmented nature of viral genome also leads to re-assortment of viral genome segments when viruses of two different strains co-infect a host at the same time. A new strain of virus emerges from this re-assortment with different viral surface proteins that lead to antigenic shift, an abrupt change of antigenic properties of HA. Antigenic shift occurs only in Influenza A viruses. Antigenic drift and antigenic shift enable influenza viruses to escape from neutralization by existing antibodies.

H3 Influenza

[0041] The first detailed structure of an influenza HA determined over 35 years ago shed light on the antibody-binding sites of HA and presents a molecular explanation to antigenic drift and antigenic shift (Wilson, I. A., et al, Nature (1981) 289:366-373; Wiley, D. C, et al, Nature (1981) 289:373-378; Wiley, D. C, and Skehel, J. J., Ann Rev Biochem (1987) 6:365-394).

[0042] Comparison of HA sequences of antigenically distinct viruses identified

immunodominant antigenic sites in the globular head domain of H3 HA, a group 2 subtype HA. The descriptions of immunodominant antigenic sites of H3 HA are substantiated by others

(Both, G. W., et al, J. Virol (1983) 48:52-60). The approximate positions of these antigenic sites in a HA structure are schematically shown in Figure 2. The sequence positions of these antigenic sites are shown in Figure 5. Site A is located in the surface loop of residues 133 to 148 of the HA of A/Aichi/2/1968 H3N2 strain (numbering as H3 in Figure 5). This loop, known as the 140-loop, projects from the globular head domain and is on the lower rim of the receptor binding pocket. Site B is located on the top of the globular head domain and comprises the surface a helix of residues 187 to 196 and adjacent surface loop of residues 155 to 160 along the upper rim of the receptor binding pocket. Site C surrounds the disulfide bond between Cys52 and Cys277.

Crossing of the loop (residues 46 to 55) centered at Cys52 and the loop (residues 271 to 280) centered at Cys277 forms a bulge at the hinge between the globular head domain and the stem domain. Site D resides in the interface region between the HA monomer subunits of an HA trimer. It centers at two β-strands of residues 200 to 214 in the eight-stranded β-sheet structure in the core of the globular head domain. Residues at the turns of the other β-strands may also be part of Site D. Site D is mostly buried in the HA trimer interface. It is not clear how Site D functions as an antigenic site. Site E is located between Site A and Site C on the side of the globular head domain and is made of surface loops of residues 62 to 63, residues 78 to 83, and the β-strand of residues 119 to 122 on the edge of the eight-stranded β-sheets. Together these residues of Site E form a continuous surface on the side of the globular head domain. Comparing the amino acid substitutions and antigenic properties of influenza viruses that emerged during the period from 1968 to 2003 showed that substitutions responsible for major antigenic changes were located exclusively in Site A and Site B (Smith, D. J., et al, Science (2004) 305:371-376; Koel, B. F., et al, Science (2013) 342:976-979). Substitutions in Sites C, D and E appeared to cause minor antigenic changes. The results suggest that most strain- specific neutralizing antibodies bind to Site A and Site B in the periphery of the receptor binding site of the globular head domain.

HI Influenza

[0043] Genetic analyses of antigenically distinct group 1 HI HA of viral strain A/PR/8/34 identified distinct antigenic sites in the globular head domain, termed Cal, Ca2, Cb, Sa and Sb sites (Caton, A. J., et al, Cell (1982) 31:417-427; Gerhard, W., et al, Nature (1981) 290:713-717). The approximate positions of these antigenic sites in the HA structure are schematically shown in Figure 3. The sequence positions of these antigenic sites are shown in Figure 5. Cal site is located at the turns of the β-strands of the eight-stranded β-sheet structure. One of the turns of residues 165 to 169 (numbering as HI in Figure 5) is surface exposed. Residue 207 of Cal site is at the turn connecting the two β-strands corresponding to the Site D of H3 HA. Cal site of HI HA generally corresponds to Site D of H3 HA. Ca2 site is also made of two segments that are separated in the primary structure but together in the tertiary structure. One segment of Ca2 is in the surface loop of residues 136 to 141 at the corresponding position of the Site A of H3 HA.

Another segment of Ca2 is made of residues 220 to 221 on a long surface loop. Ca2 site is on the opposite side of Cal in the globular head domain of a HA monomer but is adjacent to Cal site of another HA monomer in a HA trimer. Cal site of one HA monomer forms a continuous surface with the Ca2 site of another HA monomer in the trimer structure. Cb site is a linear epitope of residues 70 to 75 that form a surface loop next to the eight-stranded β-sheet structure. It corresponds to Site E of H3 HA. Sites Sa and Sb can be considered as subsites that correspond to Site B of H3 HA. Site Sa of residues 154 to 163 overlaps with the loop corresponding to Site B loop of H3 HA. Another segment of Sa site is a nearby turn of residues 124 to 125. Site Sb corresponds to Site B oc-helix of H3 HA and mostly has the oc-helix residues 188 to 194.

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Conserved Epitopes

[0044] Natural influenza virus infection or vaccination with trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (TIV) also elicit low levels of antibodies against conserved HA epitopes that are mostly located in the membrane proximal stem domain (Ellebedy, A. H., et al, PNAS (2014)

111: 13133-13138). These antibodies recognize epitopes conserved among many strains of influenza viruses. Those that provide protection against several strains are termed broadly

neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). These bNAbs generally do not have HA inhibition activity and do not prevent HA binding to host cell surface receptors. The first cross-strain antibodies C179 has been characterized over 20 years ago (Okuno, Y., et ah, J. Virol (1993) 67:2552-2558). It recognizes a conformational epitope of residues 318 to 322 (TGLRN) of HA1 and residues 47 to 58 (GITNKVNSVIEK) of HA2 that are conserved among HI and H2 strains. C179 inhibits the fusion activity of HA and thus results in virus neutralization.

[0045] Many bNAbs have been detected or isolated from patients infected with influenza viruses (Ekiert, D. C, and Wilson, I. A., Curr Opin Virol (2012) 2: 134-141). The bNAbs have been demonstrated to neutralize group 1, group 2, or both group 1 and group 2 influenza A viruses. Many of the antigenic epitopes recognized by bNAbs have been identified and characterized.

These epitopes are either a linear segment of HA sequence or conformational epitopes with multiple linear segments of HA sequence. Many of the epitopes to bNAbs are located in the less variable stem domain of HA proteins. These epitopes include but are not limited to the fusion peptides and the peptide sequences around the MCS.

[0046] Many bNAbs and their epitopes have been structurally characterized. For example, bNAb FI6 recognizes residues of the MCS and the fusion peptide in HAO (Corti, D., et ah, Science (2011) 333:850-856). Peptide mapping of HA identified two peptides as FI6 epitopes,

PvKKRGLFGAIAGFIE consisting of the MCS and most of the fusion peptide and

KESTQKAIDGVTNKVNS of a helix coiled-coil peptide in HA2. The proposed neutralization mechanism of FI6 is to inhibit membrane fusion as well as to prevent HA maturation by blocking access of protease to the MCS of HAO. Another bNAb F10 recognizes a conformational epitope around the fusion peptide in the mature form of HA (Su, J., et ah, Nat Struct Mol Biol (2009) 16:265-273). F10 inhibits all group 1 influenza A viruses presumably by preventing membrane fusion.

[0047] Monoclonal bNAb 1C9 inhibits cell fusion in vitro (US Patent 8,540,995;

Prabhu, N., et al, J. Virol (2009) 83:2553-2562). 1C9 recognizes a linear epitope of GLFGAIAGF, the N-terminus of the fusion peptide of the H5 HA2 of HPAI H5N1 (Immune Epitope Database web address: iedb.org/assay details.php?assayld=1599077). 1C9 shows protection in mice against infection by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus. Monoclonal bNAbs have also been isolated from memory B cells (Hu, W., et ah, Virol (2013) 435:320-328). Several of these monoclonal antibodies recognize a linear epitope of FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH of HA2 from 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. This epitope is C-terminal to the 1C9 epitope of the fusion peptide. The sequences of the 14 residues of HA fusion peptides are highly conserved across influenza A and B viruses.

[0048] The conserved nature of HA fusion peptides has been explored to develop universal influenza vaccine. A peptide conjugate vaccine, based on the highly conserved sequence of the HAO of the influenza B virus that includes the last 9 amino acid residues of HAl that contains the MCS and the fusion peptide of HA2 at both sides of the scission bond, elicited a protective immune response against lethal challenge with virus strains of antigenically distinct lineages of influenza B viruses (Bianchi, E., et al, J. Virol (2005) 79:7380-7388).

[0049] Monoclonal bNAb CR6261 recognizes a highly conserved region in HA2 helix A and HAl residues in the stem domain (Ekiert, D. C, et al, Science (2009) 324:246-251). CR6261 neutralizes group 1 influenza viruses by preventing conversion of HA to the post-fusion conformation. CR6261 belongs to bNAbs that use the same VH1-69 germline antibody heavy chain. Another VHl-69 monoclonal antibody, CR8020 neutralizes group 2 influenza viruses. CR8020 binds HA at the base of the stem domain in close proximity (-15 to 20 A) to the membrane, analogous to those antibodies against HIV that recognize the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) from the HIV gp41 subunit (Ekiert, D. C, et al, Science (2011) 333:843-850). The two main components of CR8020 epitope consist of the C-terminal portion (HA2 residues 15 to 19, EGMID of H3) of the fusion peptide and the outermost strand (HA2 residues 30 to 36, EGTGQAA of H3) of the 5-stranded β sheet near the base of the stem domain. These two components are 10 residues apart in the primary structure of H3. Most bNAbs that bind to the stem domain of HA neutralize either group 1 (HI, H2, H5, H6, H8, H9, HI 1, H12, H13, and H16) or group 2 (H3, H4, H7, H10, H14, and H15) of HAs of influenza A viruses. These antibodies do not inhibit HA binding to host cells but may prevent fusion of viral membrane and host cell membrane.

[0050] The HA receptor binding site is a pocket at the top of the globular head domain (Wilson, I. A., et al, Nature (1981) 289:366-373; Wiley, D. C, and Skehel, J. J., Ann Rev Biochem (1987) 56:365-394). This pocket is formed by amino acid residues highly conserved across many influenza strains. The rim of the pocket is formed by the immunodominant antigenic sites, such as Site A and Site B in H3 as described above. Cloning of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from healthy human subjects identified bNAbs that recognize conserved residues in close proximity to the receptor binding site in the globular head domain of HA from HI, H2, and H3

strains (Krause, J. C, et al, J. Virol (2011) 85: 10905-10908; Krause, J. C, et al, J. Virol (2012) 86:6334-6340). Structural studies revealed that at least some of these bNAbs mimic the interaction of the sialic acid to the receptor binding pocket (Whittle, J. R. R., et al, PNAS (2011)

108: 14216-14221; Ekiert, D. C, et al, Nature (2012) 489:526-532).

[0051] Stem-reactive antibodies are rare in natural infection and even less in immunization with current seasonal flu vaccines. Only a subset of these antibodies are neutralizing antibodies. Due to the conserved nature of the stem domain, most of the neutralizing antibodies are bNAbs. Cloning from antibody libraries made from human subjects can now routinely identify these rare broadly neutralizing stem-reactive antibodies (Kashyap, A. K., et al, PNAS (2008) 105:5986-5991; Wrammert, J., et al., Nature (2008) 453:667-671). The rare occurrence of these stem-reactive antibodies leads to the hypothesis that these epitopes in the stem domain are immunosubdominant whereas the epitopes in the globular head domain are immunodominant to which most antibodies are directed (Krammer, F., and Palese, P., Nature Rev Drug Disc (2015) 14: 167-182). Repeated exposure to prevalent seasonal flu viruses or immunization with seasonal flu vaccines leads to production of antibodies against the immunodominant antigenic sites in the globular head domain. It has been suggested that the presence of the immunodominant epitopes in the globular head domain may skew secondary responses away from the stem domain (Russell, C. J., N Engl J Med (2011) 365: 1541-1542). Individuals who have been infected with current strains or vaccinated against them may have a harder time mounting a universal response than those who are

immunologically naive.

M2 Protein and its Epitope

[0052] M2 is a single-pass transmembrane protein that forms a homotetramer proton channel in the viral envelope (Lamb. R. A., et al, Cell (1985) 40:627-633; Pielak, R. M., and Chou, J. J., Biochim Biophys Acta. (2011) 1808:522-529). It exists in much lower abundance compared to HA ( 1 : 10 to 1 : 100 ratio of M2:HA) in the viral envelope. M2 proton channel function is important to regulating the pH of viral interior for releasing viral proteins into the cytosol of host cells and to regulating the pH of the Golgi lumen for HA transport to the cell surface. Influenza A virus M2 (AM2) protein has 97 residues with an extracellular N-terminal domain of residues 1 to 23 known as M2e, a transmembrane (TM) domain of residues 24 to 46, and an intracellular C-terminal domain of residues 47 to 97. The TM domains from four M2 molecules form a four-helix bundle that functions as a pH- sensitive proton channel to regulate pH across the viral membrane during cell entry and across the trans-Golgi membrane of infected cells during virus assembly and exit. The large cytoplasmic domain is crucial for a stable tetramer formation and plays a role in virus assembly, through its association with the Ml protein of virion inner shell. Except for the HXXXW sequence motif in the TM domain that is essential for proton channel function, the M2 proteins of influenza A, B and C viruses share almost no sequence homology. However, the 10 N-terminal extracellular residues of AM2 are conserved in all influenza A viruses.

[0053] The influenza A virus M2 (AM2) is the target of the antiviral drugs amantadine and rimantadine which block the AM2 proton channel. The drug rimantadine, which stabilizes the closed state of the proton channel, binds to a lipid-facing pocket near the C-terminal end of the channel domain. Amantadine is an antiviral drug with activity against influenza A viruses, but not influenza B viruses. The use of these channel blockers has been discontinued due to widespread drug resistance as a result of mutations in the channel domain of AM2. Many of these mutations give rise to somewhat attenuated viruses that are less transmissible than wild type (WT) viruses. These drug resistant mutants can revert to WT in the absence of drug selection pressure.

[0054] M2 protein is an integral membrane protein expressed abundantly on the surface of host cells infected with influenza viruses (Lamb, R. A., et al, Cell (1985) 40:627-633). It is suggested that M2 is a cell surface antigen for cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to influenza virus. Infection of influenza A viruses only elicit low titers of antibodies against M2 (Feng, J., et al, Virol J. (2006) 3: 102-115). The high degree of structural conservation of M2e could in part be the consequence of a poor M2e-specific antibody response and thus the absence of pressure for change. Anti-M2 antibody responses were more robust among individuals with preexisting antibodies to M2 protein (Zhong, W., et al, J. Infect Dis (2014) 209:986-994). The anti-M2 antibodies induced as a result of infection with 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus were cross-reactive to M2 protein of seasonal influenza A viruses. Treating mice with anti-M2e antibodies significantly delayed progression of the disease and led to isolation of M2e escape mutants, suggesting the potential of using M2e as a vaccine against influenza A virus infection (Zharikova, D., et al, J. Virol (2005) 79:6644-6654).

[0055] A DNA vaccine based on the fusion of M2e with HA has been described

(Park, K. S., et al, Vaccine (2011) 29:5481-5487). This fusion protein has one human M2e peptide and one avian M2e peptide positioned at the N-terminus of HA protein through a 20-residue linker between each other. The expression of the encoded M2e-HA fusion protein was

confirmed. Mice immunized with the M2e-HA fusion DNA vaccine showed enhanced T cell response to M2e and complete protection from lethal challenge of heterologous avian influenza virus.

[0056] A recombinant fusion protein comprising of four tandem repeats of M2e genetically fused to the C-terminus of Mycobacterium tuberculosis HSP70 (mHSP70) protein showed protection against multiple strains of influenza viruses in mice (Ebrahimi, S. M., et al., Virology (2012) 430:63-72). The M2e peptide, S LLTE VETPIRNEWGCRCNDS S D , has been conjugated to a cationic liposome delivery vehicle along with peptides from other influenza proteins and the BM2, the homolog of M2e of Influenza B virus as vaccine (Patent Application

US2010/086584_A1). The vaccine elicited immune response against M2e in mice. Mice vaccinated with the M2e peptide containing vaccine were protected from lethal influenza virus challenge. An inactivated influenza vaccine supplemented with M2e VLP conferred improved and long-lasting cross protection against antigenically different influenza A viruses in mice

(Song, J-M., et al., PNAS (2011) 108:757-761).

Modification of Immunodominant Regions

[0057] This invention includes genetically modified recombinant influenza hemagglutinin (HA) genes and proteins that result from replacing the immunodominant regions of the globular head domain of HA with alternative epitopes or inserting the alternative epitopes therein to direct the host immune response to these epitopes. Some of these epitopes are recognized by bNAbs to HAs. The invention is also directed to modified HA proteins and genes with modified MCSs and to combinations of these modifications.

[0058] In one embodiment, modified recombinant HAs have the immunodominant antigenic sites of the globular head domain replaced by the extracellular domain of the M2 protein (M2e), or M2e is inserted into the immunodominant antigenic sites.

[0059] Guided by the three dimensional structures of HA proteins, a specific surface peptide or such surface peptides of immunodominant regions are replaced by a heterologous peptide or several heterologous peptides of other regions of the same HA or a heterologous peptide or several heterologous peptides from a HA of another subtype or strain of influenza virus. These heterologous peptides may be inserted into the immunodominant regions. In addition, the specific surface peptide or peptides of HA are replaced by heterologous peptides from other proteins that are not related to HA, or such peptides are inserted therein. These heterologous peptides are either natural proteins or artificially designed. They may not be recognized by currently known antibodies.

[0060] The immunodominant regions of HA are on the surface of the globular head domain of HA. These surface regions to be modified are surface-exposed helices, β-strands, or loops. These surface regions are preferably immunodominant antigenic sites and epitopes or parts of such antigenic sites and epitopes or next to such antigenic sites and epitopes.

[0061] In some embodiments, the immunodominant regions of HA globular head domain are replaced by peptides of the immunosubdominant epitopes of HA that are recognized by bNAbs to HAs. In other embodiments, the immunodominant regions of HA globular head domain are replaced by peptides of the immunosubdominant epitopes that are recognized by antibodies that neutralize a group of influenza viruses. These immunosubdominant epitopes are selected from the HA stem domain, or include the HA fusion peptide or the HA maturation cleavage site.

[0062] The recombinant modified HA proteins of this invention are expressed in cell culture and secreted into the cell culture media at levels similar to recombinant wild-type HA. These designs are applicable to any influenza HA of all strains of influenza A, B and C viruses, including but not limited to the influenza viruses that infect human, and the influenza viruses that infect other mammalian and avian species. In one embodiment, these modified HA proteins can be used as immunogens to make vaccines against influenza virus infection in human or animals.

[0063] These immunodominant regions may be changed by site-directed mutagenesis. The solvent-exposed residues of an antigenic site are identified by the three-dimensional structures of HA proteins. A solvent-exposed residue or several solvent-exposed residues of an antigenic site are changed by site-directed mutagenesis or replaced with a peptide containing the specific changes of these residues. The new site has the same secondary structure as the original site.

Illustrative HA with Antigenic Sites Replaced by Heterologous Epitopes

[0064] Based on the HA structure as illustrated in Figure 3, several positions in HA are selected to illustrate the feasibility of replacing immunodominant antigenic sites in the globular head domain by heterologous peptides from the stem domain of HA, for example.

[0065] Peptide KTSS of residues 119 to 122 (numbering as WT in Figure 5) is a surface-exposed helical structure near the Sa site residues 124 to 125. The Sa site is on the side of the globular head domain of HA trimer and away from the receptor binding site. Modification at this site is unlikely to change the receptor binding site and hence the host receptor binding by the modified HA. The four-residue peptide KTSS is replaced by bNAb epitopes of the stem domain. HAGAKS of residues 137-142 at the Ca2 site that corresponds to the Site A of H3 HA, is a major immunodominant site. KKGNSYPKLSKS at residues 153 to 164 is a surface loop at the Sa site that corresponds to the Site B of H3 HA. The N-terminal part of this peptide KKGNS at residues 153 to 157 is replaced in some constructs. TSADQQSLYQNA at residues 184 to 195 of Sb site forms the helix at the top of the HA globular head domain.

[0066] The surface loop of the Sa site and helix of the Sb site are adjacent to each other in the globular head domain of HA and correspond to the Site B of H3. Together the Sa site and Sb site can accommodate a conformational epitope with loop and helix structures. However, since these sites are near the receptor binding site, replacement of these peptides may destroy the receptor binding site. EIAIRPKVRDQE at residues 213 to 224 of Ca2 site is a loop near the interface between two HA monomers. This loop has contacts with the β- strands of the adjacent HA monomer that corresponds to the Site D of H3 HA. Part of the loop is surface-exposed. Ca2 site is located within this peptide. In some constructs, this peptide is partially replaced.

[0067] In addition, the heterologous peptides can be placed in or near any other antigenic sites as illustrated in Figure 5, and surface loops or helices as illustrated in Figure 1 to Figure 3. Furthermore, a heterologous peptide can be inserted into any of these positions without any deletion of residues of the antigenic sites.

[0068] The bNAb CR8020 epitope is located in the stem domain. As shown in Figure 5 and Figure 6, the CR8020 epitope has two main components consisting of the outermost β strand (HA2 residues 30 to 36, EGTGQAA of H3 HA, SEQ ID NO:26) of the 5-stranded β-sheet near the base of the stem domain and the C-terminal portion (HA2 residues 15 to 19, EGMID of H3 HA, SEQ ID NO:25) of the fusion peptide. These two components are separated by 10 amino acid residues in primary structure. A composite CR8020 epitope EGMID YEGTGQAA

(SEQ ID NO:27) is designed in which the two epitope components are linked by a tyrosine (Y). This composite CR8020 epitope is used as a heterologous peptide to replace the immunodominant sites.

[0069] Another bNAb 1C9 epitope is the fusion peptide in the N-terminus of HA2 present in the stem domain. A modified 1C9 epitope peptide of GIFGAIAGFIEG (SEQ ID NO:36) was designed as a peptide to be displayed in an immunodominant site. This modified 1C9 peptide, denoted as I1C9, has isoleucine (I) substitution of leucine (L) at the position 2 of the H5 fusion peptide recognized by bNAb 1C9. This I1C9 fusion peptide is present in swine HI HA and HAs of some H6 and H9 viruses. This I1C9 peptide is placed at different immunodominant sites.

Multiple constructs have been made with I1C9 to an antigenic site with shifted positions.

[0070] The bNAb FI6 epitope is a conformational epitope containing two peptides that form a continuous surface on the tertiary structure of HA precursor HA0 but separated in the primary structure (Figure 5). One FI6 epitope peptide RKKRGLFGAIAGFIE is the maturation cleavage site and fusion peptide of HA0. Another FI6 peptide KESTQKAIDGVTNKVNS has a coiled-coil structure in HA2. A construct has been made wherein these two FI6 epitope peptides were placed in the globular head domain. The FI6 epitope peptide RKKRGLFGAIAGFIE is placed at the Sa site of residues 153 to 164 and the coiled-coil FI6 epitope peptide

KESTQKAIDGVTNKVNS is placed at the Sb site of residues 184 to 195. In another construct, the FI6 epitope peptide RKKRGLFGAIAGFIE is placed at the Sa site without the second FI6 epitope peptide.

[0071] Many bNAb epitopes have been characterized. Any of them can be placed at or near the immunodominant antigenic sites or surface loops in the globular head domain as described above.

[0072] In other embodiments, the heterologous peptides are peptides of the extracellular domain of M2 proteins (M2e peptides). M2e peptides are conserved and less variable among influenza A viruses. M2e peptides are also conserved and less variable among influenza B viruses, although the M2e peptides from the influenza A viruses and influenza B viruses are different.

[0073] In some embodiments, the heterologous peptides are artificially designed peptides that make specific changes to the immunodominant antigenic sites by site-directed mutagenesis. In some embodiments, an artificial peptide combines desirable features of an immunodominant antigenic site and a heterologous peptide. In some embodiments, an artificial peptide has the residues for interaction with a bNAb and residues of the original immunodominant antigenic sites to maintain the three dimensional structure of the HA globular head domain. These artificial peptides are either rationally designed based on the HA three dimensional structures or by screening a library of randomly generated peptides.

[0074] Constructs have been made to place M2e peptide SLLTEVETPTRNGWECKCSDS at either the Ca2 site or the Sb site for expression using baculovirus expression system or mammalian expression system. The M2e peptide can be further optimized based on consensus of sequences from different influenza strains.

HA with Modified Maturation Cleavage Site

[0075] This invention includes embodiments wherein the protease susceptibility of the HA maturation cleavage site (MCS) is changed to make the resulting HA susceptible to a different class of proteases and resistant to those trypsin-like proteases that cleave the native HA maturation cleavage sites of all strains of influenza viruses. An altered MCS is designed to be recognized by a specific protease that is not present in known natural hosts of influenza viruses. This makes the resulting HA resistant to maturation in all natural hosts of influenza viruses. In the presence of this specific protease that recognizes this altered maturation cleavage site, these resulting HAs are cleaved to the mature form containing HA1 and HA2. Recombinant influenza viruses made from the resulting HAs in the presence of this specific protease form mature HA and become infectious to natural influenza hosts. However, the viral progeny replicated in infected natural hosts are not infectious due to the lack of the proper proteases in natural hosts.

[0076] HI HA molecules often have a single basic residue in the MCS. This single basic residue is usually an arginine (R) residue, N-terminal to the scission bond. Adding multiple basic residues, such as arginine (R) or lysine (K), in the MCS of a HI HA increases the infectivity of the recombinant influenza viruses containing the modified HA. Replacing a native HI MCS with H5 MCS that contains polybasic residues increases the infectivity of the recombinant influenza viruses containing the modified HA (Kong, W-p., et al, PNAS (2006) 103: 15987-15991). These polybasic residues are more susceptible to cleavage by many intracellular trypsin-like proteases. In some embodiments, HI HA MCS is modified by replacing it with H5 HA MCS or polybasic residues. The HI HA MCS is also modified by inserting polybasic residues between the last residue (arginine) of HA1 and the first residue (glycine) of HA2.

[0077] Further disclosed are genetically modified recombinant influenza HA genes and proteins with altered MCS sequences. The native MCS is replaced by sequences from the MCS from another HA. The said changes include replacing the native MCS of a HA with another MCS from a different HA that are known to make recombinant influenza viruses more infectious, presumably by making the resulting HA more susceptible to maturation cleavage by unidentified host proteases. In the preferred embodiment, the native MCS of HI HA is replaced by an MCS of H5 HA, or replaced by polybasic residues of arginine (R) and lysine (K).

[0078] Several mammalian proteases such as Factor Xa and enterokinase have their respective cleavage recognition site located completely on the N-terminal side of the scission bond. Their cleavage recognition site can also be used to replace the native HA maturation cleavage site. As in the case of the native HA, the C-terminal side of the scission bond of these protease cleavage sites is a glycine (G). The thrombin cleavage site also has a glycine (G) on the C-terminal side of the scission bond. After thrombin cleavage, a new N-terminus of glycine (G) is generated. All these proteases are present in many natural influenza hosts. However these proteases are usually either not present or in trace amount in cell culture media or cell lines used for recombinant HA production.

[0079] TEV protease of tobacco etch virus (TEV) recognizes a cleavage site of ENLYFQG and cleaves between glutamate (Q) and glycine (G). The free N-terminus generated by TEV protease cleavage is glycine (G), the same as N-terminal residue of HA2 after HA maturation. Unlike the MCS of native HA, there are no basic residues in TEV cleavage site. In some embodiments, the entire HA MCS is replaced by the TEV cleavage site, or a few residues of the MCS are replaced by the TEV cleavage site, or only the arginine (R) N-terminal to the scission bond, for example, is replaced by the TEV cleavage site. The HA constructs with the MCSs replaced by TEV cleavage site are expressed using baculovirus expression system or mammalian expression system, and constructs that express to the same level as wild-type HA have been identified.

[0080] In the presence of TEV protease that cleaves the modified MCS, the said modified HA undergoes maturation and is converted to HA1 and HA2 with the native N-terminus of fusion peptide. The mature modified recombinant HA has the capability to bind the corresponding host cell receptors and undergo membrane fusion. In the absence of the TEV protease, the newly synthesized said modified HA remains as the uncleaved HA0 precursor. The lack of free N-terminus of fusion peptide prevents the said HA from membrane fusion. The progeny HA protein

produced in the infected host cells remains as HAO and is not processed to the mature functional form due to the lack of TEV protease in the host. The newly made viruses with HAO do not have the ability of membrane fusion and therefore are non-infectious.

Combinations of Antigenic Sites and Maturation Cleavage Sites

[0081] The changes of the antigenic sites in the globular domain of HA and the changes of MCS in the stem domain of HA can be in any kind of combinations. A particular heterologous peptide can be introduced to an antigenic site in the globular head domain of HA proteins with different altered maturation cleavage sites. In addition, two or more heterologous peptides can be introduced to a single HA protein at different antigenic sites. In one embodiment, a genetically modified recombinant influenza HA has M2e peptide replacing an antigenic site in the globular head domain of HA and TEV protease site as the MCS. In another embodiment, a genetically modified recombinant influenza HI HA has M2e peptide replacing an antigenic site in the globular head domain of HA and H5 MCS in place of HI native MCS.

Methods of Production

[0082] For production of modified HA, the protein is secreted by the cells into the cell culture medium as soluble form and is not an integral membrane protein or is not attached to cell membranes or cell surface. In some embodiments, the native HA signal sequence is used for secretion in insect cells and in mammalian cells. In other embodiments, the native HA signal sequence is replaced by an insect cell signal sequence for secretion in insect cells or a mammalian signal sequence for secretion in mammalian cells. In place of the HA transmembrane domain and intracellular domain, a protease cleavage site is placed at the C-terminal end of the HA

extracellular domain, followed by a "foldon" sequence derived from the bacteriophage T4 fibritin to stabilize the HA trimer, and a C-terminal His-tag to facilitate purification. The recombinant HA protein is made either as a full-length uncleaved precursor HAO with the signal sequence removed or the mature form containing HA1 and HA2 subunits with the wild-type fusion peptide at the N-terminus of HA2. In the preferred embodiment, the final purified genetically modified HA forms a trimer as the wild-type HA.

[0083] The genes of the designed recombinant influenza HA are made by de novo gene synthesis. The gene synthesis technologies have been well established and extensively reviewed (Kosuri, S., and Church, G. M., Nat Methods (2014) 11:499-507). Genes of over 10 kb in length have been routinely made by commercial providers. Gene synthesis offers the ability to modify specific HA sequences and the opportunity of codon-optimization according to the expression hosts or specific genetic engineering needs. Restriction sites are designed at specific locations of the synthesized HA genes to facilitate exchange of HA fragments between different constructs. The synthesized HA genes with the signal sequences and the protease sites, foldon sequence, and C-terminal His-tag are incorporated into baculovirus genome with well-established protocols so that the expression of the modified HA proteins is directed by baculovirus polyhedrin promotor. In other embodiments, the same set of HA genes are cloned into mammalian expression vectors for expression in mammalian cells.

[0084] In some embodiments, HA constructs are codon-optimized for expression in insect cells using baculovirus vectors. In other embodiments, HA constructs are codon-optimized for expression in mammalian cells, including but not limited to CHO cells (Chinese hamster ovary cells) and HEK 293 cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells). Codon optimization to any organism is routinely done using commercial software such as Lasergene software package from DNASTAR, Inc. (3801 Regent Street, Madison, WI 53705 USA), online web server such as OPTIMIZER (located on the World Wide Web at genomes.urv.es/OPTIMIZER/), or by gene synthesis service providers using their proprietary algorithms. Codon optimization takes into considerations of G/C content, elimination of cryptic splice sites and RNA destabilizing sequence elements, and avoidance of stable RNA secondary structures. Codons are also manually adjusted based on the Codon Usage Database (located on the World Wide Web at kazusa.or.jp/codon/). Due to codon degeneracy, gene sequences can be changed without changing the encoded amino acid sequences. Restriction sites are introduced at specific locations by changing codons without changing amino acid sequences. Using any of these methods, gene sequences, with or without codon optimization to a specific organism, are routinely generated by back translation of protein sequences using a computer algorithm or manually.

[0085] Other embodiments include a method to make recombinant non-infectious influenza viruses from the genetically modified HA genes with the MCS changed to the TEV protease recognition site using established cell culture methods. Reverse-genetics systems that allow production of influenza viruses from RNA segments or plasmids with cloned cDNAs have been developed, with or without using helper virus (Luytjes, W., et al., Cell (1989) 59: 1107-1113; Neumann, G., et al, PNAS (1999) 96:9345-9350; Fodor, E., et al, J. Virol (1999) 73:9679-9682; de Wit, E., et al., J. Gen Virol (2007) 88: 1281-1287). Infectious influenza viruses are made by transient transfection of mammalian cells with influenza RNA segments or plasmids with the cDNA of influenza RNAs. These viruses that are isolated from the cell culture media are used to infect embryonated chicken eggs to produce live infectious influenza viruses for making vaccines. Some of the influenza RNA segments are replaced by a foreign gene. Recombinant influenza A viruses have been made using an influenza C virus HEF protein replacing HA protein (Gao, Q., et al, J. Virol (2008) 82:6419-6426). In these embodiments, the cDNA or RNA of the modified HA is co-transfected to mammalian cells with cDNAs of the other 7 influenza RNAs or the other 7 RNA segments made by standard molecular techniques and gene synthesis. Using an established method or similar methods, multiple identical or different HA proteins can be packaged in a single virion (Uraki, R., et al, J. Virol (2013) 87:7874-7881).

[0086] Methods to make recombinant infectious influenza viruses from a genetically modified HA gene use established cell culture methods as described above. In these embodiments, a genetically modified HA gene with H5 HA MCS or polybasic sequence at the MCS is co-transfected to mammalian cells with cDNAs of the other 7 influenza RNAs or the other 7 RNA segments made by standard reverse genetics system as described above. These modified maturation cleavage sites increase the efficiency of HA maturation in influenza natural hosts or in cell culture (Kong, W-p., et al, PNAS (2006) 103: 15987-15991). The mature functional HA protein has the ability to bind to host cells and fuse with host cell membrane.

[0087] Other embodiments include a method to make recombinant influenza virus-like particles (VLP) from the genetically modified HA genes using established cell culture methods in mammalian cells, in insect cells, and in plant cells (Chen, B. J., et al., J. Virol (2007) 81:7111-7123; Smith, G. E., et al, Vaccine (2013) 31:4305-4313; D'Aoust, M. A., et al, Plant Biotech (2010) 8:607-619).

[0088] Other embodiments include a method to make DNA vaccines from the genetically modified HA genes using established methods (Jiang, Y., et al, Antiviral Res (2007) 75:234-241; Alexander, J., et al, Vaccine (2010) 28:664-672; Rao, S. S., et al, PLoS ONE (2010) 5:e9812).

[0089] The expression results disclosed herein show that the MCS of HI HA can be modified without affecting the expression of the resulting HA. Constructs with H5 HAMCS or polybasic MCS have been demonstrated to express to the same level as the wild type HI HA. Furthermore, the MCS of HA is replaced by TEV protease cleavage site which does not have any

basic residues. By changing the position of the TEV protease cleavage site, constructs with TEV cleavage site as the MCS have been made that expressed to the same level as the wild type HI HA.

[0090] The expression results further show that many of the antigenic sites in the globular head domain of HA1 can be replaced by heterologous peptides from the stem domain of the same HA or different HAs. Some of the constructs are expressed to the same level as the wild type HA, whereas other constructs are expressed much less. The nature of the heterologous peptides and the locations of the heterologous peptides in the globular head domain have significant impact on the expression level of each resulting HA construct. More constructs can be made and tested in the same manner for their expression to identify the most optimal expression constructs.

[0091] In addition, recombinant HAs are made with replacements of certain

immunodominant antigenic sites of HA globular head domain by M2e epitope from influenza M2 protein. Conceivably, any epitope of other influenza proteins can serve as a replacing peptide to replace an immunodominant antigenic site in the HA globular head domain. Furthermore, a heterologous replacing peptide can be derived from another protein not related to influenza viruses. A specific antigenic site in the HA globular head domain can be chosen for a replacing peptide to maintain the native structural feature of the replacing peptide as much as possible to present the replacing peptide to host immune system.

Baculovirus Expression System

[0092] Since its introduction about 30 years ago (US Patent 4,745,051; Summers, M. D., and Smith, G. E., (1987) A Manual of Methods for Baculovirus Vectors and Insect Cell Culture Procedures. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin No. 1555.), baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) has been used to express many different types of human and viral proteins including intracellular proteins, membrane proteins, and secreted proteins. BEVS has been used to produce virus-like particles (VLPs). BEVS is a eukaryotic expression system that uses insect cells as host, which provides post-translational modifications of proteins similar to mammalian cells (Jarvis, D. L., "Baculovirus Expression Vectors" in The Baculoviruses, ed. Miller, L. K. (1997) pp. 389-420 Plenum Press, New York). BEVS based on Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) has been well established. Many commercial kits are available for producing recombinant baculoviruses. BEVS has been successfully used to produce recombinant vaccines marketed in US. Two FDA approved vaccines, Cervarix™, a recombinant human Papillomavirus bivalent (Types 16 and 18) vaccine in the form of non-infectious virus-like

particles (VLPs) against cervical cancer (Patent Application WO2010/012780 Al) and Flublok (US Patent 5,762,939 A and 5,858,368 A), a trivalent influenza vaccine made of membrane bound hemagglutinin precursors (HAO) against influenza, are produced using BEVS.

[0093] To express a target protein using BEVS, the gene-of-interest that encodes the target protein is first subcloned into a transfer vector which is an E. coli plasmid containing baculovirus sequences flanking the baculovirus polyhedrin gene. Polyhedrin is an abundant viral protein in wild type baculoviruses that is not needed for baculovirus propagation in cell culture. The transfer vector is propagated in E. coli and isolated using standard molecular biology techniques

(Sambrook, J., et ah, (1989) Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor). The transfer vector with gene-of-interest is recombined with baculovirus genomic DNA to produce a recombinant baculovirus genome either in E. coli or in insect cells. The recombinant baculovirus genome directs the production of the recombinant baculoviruses and the expression of the target protein. The original method relies on homologous recombination between the same sequences flanking the polyhedrin gene in transfer vector and in viral genomic DNA in insect cells. The isolated transfer vector DNA is co-transfected with baculovirus genomic DNA into insect cells. Recombinant baculoviruses are selected for the lack of polyhedrin. Current commercial kits, such as BacPAK™ Baculovirus Expression System from Clontech and BacMagic™ System from Millipore, use linearized baculovirus genomic DNA that does not produce viable virus without recombination. These kits allow production of recombinant baculoviruses with high efficiency and little contamination of non-recombinant viruses.

Recombination to viral genome can also be made in vitro using Gateway recombination reaction (BaculoDirect™ Baculovirus Expression System, Life Technologies). Another method to make recombinant viruses is through site-specific transposition in E. coli (Bac-to-Bac System, Life Technologies). The pFastBac-based transfer vector contains transposons that make bacmids (a large plasmid containing the genome of a baculovirus) in E. coli (US Patent 5,348,886). The recombination of the gene-of-interest to a bacmid is easily confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) before transfection of bacmids to insect cells.

[0094] Recombinant baculoviruses are propagated in insect cell culture. A small amount of viruses is used to infect insect cells. After a few days, the conditioned media containing amplified viruses are harvested as viral stocks. This amplification process is often repeated several times to generate a large volume of viral stocks. The viral stocks are routinely stored in the dark with refrigeration for months and even years. Supplement of 5-10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) to

the viral stocks has been used to preserve the viral stocks and is believed to prolong their shelf lives. The viral stocks are sometimes frozen for long term storage at -70 °C. Viruses have also been amplified and stored as baculovirus-infected insect cells (BIIC) (Wasilko, D. J., et ah, Prot Exp Purif '(2009) 65: 122-132). The infected insect cells are harvested before their lysis as BIIC stocks and are frozen following standard cell freezing procedure. BIIC stocks are stored in liquid nitrogen or at ultra-low temperature between -65 °C to -85 °C for a long period of time and are used as viral stocks to infect insect cells for protein expression. The frozen BIIC stocks offer longer storage time than viral stocks in liquid form.

[0095] The commonly used insect cell lines for BEVS are SF9 and SF21 cells derived from fall army worm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and Hi5 or T. ni cells derived from cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni). Other insect cells derived from species of silkworm (Bombyx mori), honeycomb moth (Galleria mellonella), and gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) have also been used. SF9, SF21, and Hi5 (or T. ni) cells have been adapted to suspension culture in serum-free media. These cell lines and media are available from many commercial sources. The cell culture of these cell lines is routinely maintained in shaker flasks in small volumes of up to 1 or 2 liters in shaker incubators in ambient atmosphere without supplement of gas at temperature in the range of 22-28 °C. The cell culture is scaled up in stirred tank bioreactors or single-use bioreactors. The conditions for large scale insect cell culture in bioreactors have been well established (WAVE Bioreactor Systems -Cell culture procedures. GE Healthcare). Supplement of oxygen is also routinely used in large scale insect cell culture to increase cell density.

[0096] A series of conditions for expression of a particular target protein are tested to optimize the expression of the target protein using different cell lines by varying the virus-to-cell ratio and the harvest time post infection. SF9, SF21, and Hi5 (or T. ni) cells are the most common cell lines used for BEVS protein expression. A target protein may express better in one of the cell lines than the others. Some reports show Hi5 (or T. ni) cells give more expression of certain secreted proteins. The virus-to-cell ratio, commonly known as multiplicity of infection (MOI), is tested to determine the best infection condition for target protein expression. Culture samples are taken at various time points post infection. Cells and the conditioned media are separated by centrifugation or filtration. Protein expression levels are determined by standard methods. The culture is monitored for cell density, cell viability, and cell size, which provide the information on cell growth and culture conditions. Glucose level, dissolved oxygen, and pH of the culture are

sometimes monitored for consumption of nutrients in the media. The condition that leads to the best target protein expression is selected for large scale production of the protein.

[0097] Although determination of the titers of viral stocks and MOI is widely used to determine the infection conditions for viral amplification and protein expression using BEVS, the aforementioned TIPS method offers a faster way to determine the best infection conditions for viral amplification and protein expression. Insect cells enlarge in size after infection with recombinant baculoviruses. Cell division also stops after infection. Recombinant baculoviruses cause cell lysis around 48 hours post infection. The cell division is monitored by counting cells as cell density of the culture. Cell lysis is monitored as cell viability by counting live and dead cells in the culture. Viable cell size is measured as the cell diameter. Cell density, cell viability, and viable cell size are routinely measured by many models of cell counting instruments. Cell density and cell viability can also be measured manually using a hemocytometer. Collectively, cell density, cell viability, and viable cell size provide information on infection kinetics. TIPS method uses infection kinetics to determine the optimal condition for expression of a particular target protein using a particular viral stock. It eliminates the time consuming measurements of viral titer for MOI calculation. Consistent viral amplification and protein expression is routinely achieved using TIPS method.

[0098] In addition to insect cells, live insects infected with recombinant baculoviruses have been used to express many secreted proteins and membrane proteins. Mature HA has been expressed in larvae of tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens) (Kuroda, K., et al., J. Virol (1989) 63: 1677-1685).

[0099] Expression system based on other types of baculoviruses such as Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has also been developed. BmNPV may have a better biological safety profile over the AcNPV in that it has a narrower host range and will not grow as insect pests in the field. BmNPV-based baculovirus expression system has been used to express functional proteins in cell culture and silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae (Maeda, S., et al., Nature (1985) 315:592-594).

[0100] BEVS has been routinely used to produce protein complexes and VLPs. Two or more genes are cloned into a single vector for expression of multiple proteins. Two or more viral stocks each directing the expression of a single protein are used for co-infection of insect cells to produce protein complexes or VLPs. Influenza VLPs have been made using baculovirus expression system (Bright, R. A., et al, PLoS ONE (2008) 3:el501).

HA Transfer Vectors for Baculovirus Expression

[0101] The genes to be expressed using BEVS are commonly under the control of polyhedrin promoter, a strong late promoter of baculovirus that leads to protein expression before the baculovirus-induced insect cell death. Other early or late promoters are also used for protein expression. To secrete a recombinant target protein into the cell culture media by insect cells, a DNA segment that encodes a signal peptide is engineered at the 5' end in-frame to the gene-of-interest. Two commonly used signal peptides for insect cells are the honeybee melittin signal sequence or the AcNPV envelope surface glycoprotein GP67 signal sequence. Signal Sequence Database (located on the World Wide Web at signalpeptide.de/index.php) lists many other possible signal peptides for consideration. After secretion, the signal peptide is removed by a cellular protease that processes the signal peptide. Although influenza viruses are not insect viruses, HA signal peptides have been used as secretion signal peptides for secretion or membrane insertion of recombinant proteins in BEVS. A HA signal peptide of MKTIIALSYIFCLVFA is commonly used for expression of recombinant transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in insect cells (Rosenbaum, D. M., et al, Science (2007) 318: 1266-1273; Zou, Y., et al, PLoS One (2012) 7: e46039). HA has been expressed in insect cells using its native signal peptide. In that particular case, the total expression was lower than that using an insect cell signal peptide but the expressed HA was in the mature form containing HA1 and HA2 (US Patent 5,858,368 A). The HA signal peptides are not conserved among HAs. For example, the aforementioned HA signal peptide is different from the HI HA signal peptide of SEQ ID NO:7. Empirical selection of HA signal peptides may improve HA expression in insect cells.

[0102] Commercial vectors are available for making recombinant baculoviruses through homologous recombination, using the Bac-to-Bac system or the Gateway system (Life

Technologies). Features of these transfer vectors such as promoters and signal sequences can be customized by standard molecular biology techniques. The whole transfer vector can now be fully synthesized by gene synthesis. Gene synthesis allows designs of transfer vectors with specific sequences and features.

[0103] Methods to express influenza HA using BEVS have been well established at laboratory scale (Stevens, J., et al., Science (2004) 303: 1866-1870). For example, a transfer vector contains the HA from the 1918 influenza virus under the control of polyhedrin promoter. The 1918 influenza virus HA expression construct has a GP67 signal peptide instead of the HA signal peptide at the N-terminus for secretion. In place of the transmembrane domain, a thrombin cleavage site is introduced at the C-terminal end of the HA extracellular domain, followed by a "foldon" sequence derived from the bacteriophage T4 fibritin to stabilize the HA trimer, and a C-terminal His-tag to facilitate purification. The foldon sequence and His-tag can be removed by thrombin cleavage. Similar designs of HA expression transfer vectors have been used to express different HAs from many strains of influenza (Stevens, J., et al., Science (2006) 312:404-410; Xu, R., et al, Science (2010) 328:357-360; Whittle, J. R. R., et al, PNAS (2011)

108: 14216-14221).

[0104] In addition to foldon, other trimerization domains can be used to stabilize the trimer of recombinant HAs. For example, a thermostable HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 (gp41) trimerization domain or the initial 16 of the 31 residues of the GCN4 leucine zipper sequence was used to aid the trimerization of truncated HA constructs (Impagliazzo, A., et al., Science (2015)

349: 1301-1306; Yassing, H. M., et al., Nat Med (2015) 21: 1065-1070).

[0105] Recombinant HA precursors (HA0) from both influenza A and influenza B viruses, with the transmembrane domain and intracellular domain, have been made using BEVS at commercial scale as disclosed in US Patents 5,762,939 A, 5,858,368 A, and 6,245,532 B l. These recombinant HA proteins are the ingredients in Flublok® which has obtained FDA approval as an influenza vaccine. The HA0 in Flublok® is made using a baculovirus chitinase signal peptide (referred to as 6 IK signal peptide) to replace the HA signal peptide. The recombinant HA is associated with the peripheral membrane of insect cells. It is extracted from membrane using detergent and further purified.

Mammalian Expression

[0106] Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells are commonly used mammalian cell hosts for transient transfection gene expression of recombinant proteins. Both CHO cells and HEK293 cells have suspension cell lines and adherent cell lines. These cells are routinely cultured in media with or without FBS. When cells are

cultured without FBS, chemically defined media are often used. All suspension and adherent cell lines can be used to express HA or other secreted proteins.

[0107] Transient transfection is a well-established method to introduce DNA into cells for protein expression. Many commercial transfection reagents are available. Similar to the expression optimization process for baculovirus expression, media samples are taken periodically post transfection for analysis of protein expression using standard methods. HA proteins are easily detected by affinity capture through the His-tag in the HA constructs or Western blot using many commercially available anti-HA antibodies. Protein expression usually starts around 48 hours post transfection and may increase over several days post transfection. Supplements are sometimes added post transfection to increase the target protein expression. Other mammalian cell lines such as COS-1, a fibroblast-like cell line derived from African green monkey kidney tissue, have also been used for HA expression. Influenza VLPs have been produced by co-transfection of multiple plasmids containing cDNAs of all 10 influenza virus-encoded proteins (Mena, I., et ah, J. Virol (1996) 70: 5016-5024; Chen, B. J., et al, J. Virol (2007) 81:7111-7123).

[0108] Another method to deliver genes to mammalian cells uses recombinant baculovirus known as BacMam for baculovirus gene transfer into mammalian cells (Boyce, F. M., and

Bucher, N. L., PNAS (1996) 93:2348-2352; Dukkipatia. A., et al, Protein Expr Purif (2008) 62: 160-170). The baculovirus has been modified by incorporating a mammalian expression cassette into the baculovirus expression vector for transgene expression in mammalian cells.

Recombinant BacMam baculoviruses are generated by the standard methods for baculovirus production. Amplified recombinant BacMam baculovirus viral stocks are added to CHO or HEK293 culture for delivery of the mammalian expression cassette to the CHO or HEK293 cells for protein expression. The BacMam platform enables easy transduction of large quantities of mammalian cells.

[0109] Gene expression vectors transfected to mammalian cells can be integrated into the cell chromosomes to establish stable cell lines for expression of the target proteins. Stable CHO cell lines are the most common hosts for the production of therapeutic biologies such as monoclonal antibodies. The technology is well suited for large scale production of therapeutic proteins and vaccines. To establish a stable cell line, the cells transfected with an expression vector are subjected to selection based on the selection marker on the expression vector. Multiple copies of the target genes are often integrated into the genome of a stable cell line.

HA Vectors for Mammalian Expression

[0110] The HA expression constructs for mammalian expression have the same designs and amino acid sequences as those for baculovirus expression. The codons are optimized for CHO cell expression or HEK293 cell expression. The baculovirus codons also work well for

mammalian cells and vice versa. HA signal peptide has been used as signal peptide for secretion or membrane insertion of recombinant proteins in mammalian expression systems. Other commonly used mammalian signal peptides include human IL2 signal peptide, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) signal peptide, and many other signal peptides found in Signal Sequence Database (located on the World Wide Web at signalpeptide.de/index.php). Many mammalian expression vectors are commercially available. Each vector usually has an enhancer-promoter for high-level expression, a polyadenylation signal and transcription termination sequence for mRNA stability, SV40 origin for episomal replication, antibiotics resistance gene and pUC origin for selection and maintenance in E. coli. Commonly used promoters for mammalian expression include CMV (Cytomegalovirus) promoter, hEFl-HTLV promoter, a composite promoter comprising the Elongation Factor- la (EF-la) core promoter and the R segment and part of the U5 sequence (R-U5') of the Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus (HTLV) Type 1 Long Terminal Repeat, or other promoters found in MPromDb (Mammalian Promoter Database located on the World Wide Web at mpromdb.wistar.upenn.edu/) or The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD located on the World Wide Web at epd.vital-it.ch/). A transfer vector often has another selection marker for generating stable cell lines.

[0111] The following examples are offered to illustrate but not to limit the invention.

Example 1

Construction of Transfer Vectors of HI HA for Recombinant Baculovirus Production

[0112] In this example, a parental plasmid that can be modified to prepare the modified HA protein of the invention is described. The basic outlines of this plasmid are shown in Figure 4 wherein an insert into a standard plasmid for expression in baculovirus is bracketed by restriction sites for such insert and restriction sites are present which permit replacement of the MCS of the HA protein and replacement of the immunodominant regions in the globular head domain of HA. The encoded protein is fused to an affinity tag of 10 histidines (lOxHis-tag) for purification which can be removed by virtue of an inserted protease cleavage site after purification. This vector is designated H1WT.

[0113] The HA sequence (SEQ ID NO: 1) of A/California/07/2009, a swine origin influenza A virus H1N1 strain that was recommended by WHO for 2009 influenza vaccine production (as noted on the World Wide Web at

who.int/csr/resources/publications/swineflu/vaccine_ recommendations/en/), was used as the parental sequence to incorporate heterologous peptides. This HA sequence has the accession number of UniProt:C3W5X2. All constructs have the same design as illustrated schematically in Figure 4. The N-terminal HA signal peptide (SEQ ID NO:7) was replaced by GP67 signal peptide MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF A (SEQ ID NO:2). The C-terminal transmembrane (TM) domain with a sequence of ILAIYSTVASSLVLVVSLGAISFWMCS and intracellular domain with a sequence of NGSLQCRICI of HA was replaced by a TEV cleavage site (SEQ ID NO:4) followed by foldon (SEQ ID NO:5) and lOxHis-tag (SEQ ID NO:6), namely

GAENLYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

(SEQ ID NO:3), based on the HA construct first described by Stevens, J., et ah, Science (2006) 312:404-410. The foldon stabilizes the recombinant HA while the lOxHis-tag facilitates purification of HA from cell culture media. The foldon and lOxHis-tag can be removed by TEV protease that recognizes the TEV cleavage site located between the HA sequence and the foldon sequence. The gene was codon optimized for baculovirus expression and synthesized by standard method (GENEWIZ, South Plainfield, NJ 07080, USA).

[0114] As shown schematically in Figure 4, spaced unique restriction sites, Clal site, Nsil site, and BamHI site, were introduced into the HA sequence to facilitate sequence change and swapping. The resulting construct GP67-HlWT-TEV-foldon-10His, denoted as "HIWT"

(SEQ ID NO:9), was subcloned into a pFastBac plasmid between Ncol site and Hindlll site. The sequence between Clal and Nsil sites encodes most of the immunodominant antigenic sites of the globular head domain. The sequence between Nsil and BamHI site encodes the MCS. The expression of HIWT construct is under the control of baculovirus polyhedrin promoter. The resulting plasmid is the transfer vector for the expression of the recombinant wild type HA of A/Calif ornia/07/2009. The HIWT construct is the parental construct from which genetically modified HA constructs are made.

[0115] To make genetically modified HA with heterologous peptides, the wild type fragments of HIWT were replaced using the aforementioned restriction sites with synthesized DNA fragments that encode specific changes to the HA. To modify the MCS, the Nsil-BamHI fragment of HIWT was replaced by DNA fragments that encode altered maturation cleavage sites.

To change the antigenic sites in HAl globular head domain, the Clal-Nsil fragment of HIWT was replaced by DNA fragments that encode altered antigenic sites with heterologous peptides.

Constructs with different combinations of the maturation cleavage sites and the antigenic sites were made by simple exchanges of the restriction fragments of different plasmids. The resulting constructs were confirmed by DNA sequencing.

Example 2

Design and Construction of HI HA Constructs with Modified Maturation Cleavage Sites

[0116] In this example, the segment of HIWT between the Nsil and BamHl restriction sites that bracket the MCS is replaced by alternative sequences that modify this MCS. In several instances, the TEV cleavage site is included in the modified MCS.

[0117] Modified maturation cleavage sites were introduced into the transfer vectors of HI HA described in Example 1. Constructs with modified maturation cleavage sites are listed in Table 1.

Table 1 List of HI HA Constructs with Altered Maturation Cleavage Site

List No. Construct Name Construct Description SEQ ID Number

HlMCSa GP67ss-HlMCS-TEV-foldon-10Hisb

1 H1WTC GP67ss-HlWT-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO:9

2 HlH5cs GP67ss-HlH5cs-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO: 11

3 HlR5cs GP67ss-HlR5cs-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO: 14

4 H1IR5CS GP67ss-HlIR5cs-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO: 16

5 H1TEV1 GP67ss-HlTEVl-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO: 18

6 H1TEV2 GP67ss-HlTEV2-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO:20

7 H1TEV3 GP67ss-HlTEV3-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO:22 a Constructs name is based on the maturation cleavage site. HI denotes HI HA. MCS denotes a maturation cleavage site.

b Constructs are described by their sequence features. GP67ss denotes GP67 signal sequence. TEV-foldon-lOHis denotes the sequence of TEV cleavage site, foldon sequence, and lOxHis-tag at the C-terminus of the constructs. Schematic drawings of constructs are shown in Figure 4.

c HIWT is the wild-type HI HA construct with native MCS.

[0118] The positions of these modifications are illustrated in Figure 5.

[0119] Construct HlH5cs (SEQ ID NO: 11) has the MCS of wild type HI HA (SEQ ID NO:9) replaced by H5 MCS (SEQ ID NO: 12). Construct HlR5cs (SEQ ID NO: 14) has the MCS of wild type HI replaced by five arginines. Construct HlIR5cs (SEQ ID NO: 16) has four arginines inserted between the HA1 and HA2 sequences while keeping all the native HA1 residues . The Nsil-BamHI fragment with the changes were synthesized and subcloned between Nsil and BamHI sites of H1WT to replace the wild type fragment.

[0120] To test whether the HI HA MCS can be modified to the TEV cleavage site that does not contain any basic residue, several constructs were made by changing the number of residues at the HI HA MCS. Construct H1TEV1 (SEQ ID NO: 18) has 7 residues, PSIQSRG, at the HI HA MCS replaced by the 7-residue TEV cleavage site of ENLYFQG (SEQ ID NO:4). Construct H1TEV2 (SEQ ID NO:20) has 8 residues, IPSIQSRG, of the HI HA MCS replaced by SPENLYFQG containing the TEV cleavage site. Construct H1TEV3 (SEQ ID NO:22) has the last 3 residues (QSR) of HI HA MCS (SEQ ID NO:8) replaced by the TEV cleavage site.

Example 3

Design and Construction of HI HA Constructs with Heterologous Epitopes in the

Globular Head Domain

[0121] In this example, the basic plasmid and the plasmid with modified MCS were modified between the Clal and Nsil sites by alternative nucleotide sequences where the various immunodominant sites were replaced with heterologous epitopes.

[0122] Heterologous epitopes were introduced to the constructs described in Example 1 and Example 2. The heterologous epitopes were inserted around immunodominant antigenic sites of HA globular head domain or replaced the immunodominant antigenic sites of HA globular head domain. Constructs with modified antigenic site(s) are listed in Table 2.

Table 2 List of HI HA Constructs with Modified Immunodominant Antigenic Site in the

Globular Head Domain

List No. Construct Name Construct Description SEQ ID No.

HlMCS-ASa GP67ss-HlMCS - AS - TEV-foldon-10Hisb

8 HlH5cs-CR8020Ca GP67ss-HlH5cs-CR8020Ca-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO:24

9 HlTEV2-CR8020Ca GP67ss-HlTEV2-CR8020Ca-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO:29

10 HlTEV2-CR8020Sa3 GP67ss-HlTEV2-CR8020Sa3-TEV- SEQ ID NO:31 foldon-lOHis

List No. Construct Name Construct Description SEQ ID No.

HlMCS-ASa GP67ss-HlMCS - AS - TEV-foldon-10Hisb

11 HlTEV2-CR8020Sa4 GP67ss-HlTEV2-CR8020Sa4-TEV- SEQ ID NO: :33 foldon-lOHis

12 HlTEV2-IlC9Cal GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Cal-TEV-foldon- 10His SEQ ID NO: :35

13 HlTEV2-IlC9Ca2 GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Ca2-TEV-foldon- 10His SEQ ID NO: :38

14 HlTEV2-IlC9Sa3 GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Sa3-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO: AO

15 HlTEV2-IlC9Sa4 GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Sa4-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO: :42

16 HlH5cs-IlC9Sb GP67ss-HlH5cs-IlC9Sb-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO: :44

17 HlH5cs-IlC9Ca GP67ss-HlH5cs-IlC9Ca-TEV-foldon- 10His SEQ ID NO: :46

18 HlH5cs-FI6Sab GP67ss-HlH5cs-FI6Sab-TEV-foldon- 10His SEQ ID NO: :48

19 HlWT-FI6Sab GP67ss-HlWT-FI6Sab-TEV-foldon- 10His SEQ ID NO: :52

20 HlTEVl-FI6Sa GP67ss-HlTEVl-FI6Sa-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO: :54

21 HlH5cs-M2eCa GP67ss-HlH5cs-M2eCa2-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO: :56

22 HlH5cs-M2eSb GP67ss-HlH5cs-M2eSb-TEV-foldon- 10His SEQ ID NO: :59

23 HlTEV2-M2eCa GP67ss-HlTEV2-M2eCa2-TEV-foldon-10His SEQ ID NO: :61 a Constructs name is based on the maturation cleavage site and antigenic site modification. HI denotes HI HA. MCS denotes a maturation cleavage site. AS denotes an altered immunodominant antigenic site in the globular head domain of HI HA with a heterologous epitope. Each AS is indicated by the heterologous epitope and the HI HA immunodominant antigenic site where the heterologous epitope is placed.

b Constructs are described by their sequence features. GP67ss denotes GP67 signal sequence. TEV-foldon-lOHis denotes the TEV cleavage site, foldon sequence, and lOxHis-tag at the C-terminus of the constructs. Schematic drawing of constructs are shown in Figure 4.

[0123] The positions of these modifications are illustrated in Figure 5.

[0124] The composite CR8020 epitope peptide of 13 amino acid residues replaced a surface loop of 12 residues EIAIRPKVRDQE around the antigenic site Ca2. The Clal-Nsil fragment with composite CR8020 epitope peptide substitution was synthesized and subcloned between Clal and Nsil sites of HlH5cs to generate a HA construct denoted as HlH5cs-CR8020Ca (SEQ ID NO:24). To make HlTEV2-CR8020Ca (SEQ ID NO:29), the Clal-Nsil fragment of HlH5cs-CR8020Ca was isolated and subcloned between Clal and Nsil sites of H1TEV2.

[0125] The construct HlTEV2-CR8020Sa3 (SEQ ID NO:31) has the composite CR8020 epitope peptide replacing residues KKGNS of one of the Sa sites, which corresponds to the Site B loop of H3 HA on top of the globular head domain. The Clal-Nsil fragment with the CR8020

modification was synthesized and subcloned between Clal and Nsil sites of H1TEV2 to generate a HA construct denoted as HlTEV2-CR8020Sa3.

[0126] The construct HlTEV2-CR8020Sa4 (SEQ ID NO:33) has the composite CR8020 epitope peptide replacing a helical structure of residues KTSS near one of the Sa sites. This position is on the side of the globular head domain of HA trimer and away from the receptor binding site. Such a modification is unlikely to change the receptor binding. The Clal-Nsil fragment with the CR8020 modification was synthesized and subcloned between Clal and Nsil sites of H1TEV2 to generate a HA construct denoted as HlTEV2-CR8020Sa4.

[0127] Models of HA monomer of constructs CR8020Sa4 and CR8020Ca are shown in Figure 6. Each HA monomer has a composite CR8020 epitope peptide in the globular head domain and the native CR8020 epitope in the stem domain.

[0128] Several HA constructs with I1C9 epitope peptide of GIFGAIAGFIEG

(SEQ ID NO:36) were made. One construct HlTEV2-IlC9Cal (SEQ ID NO:35) has I1C9 peptide replacing RPKVRDQE at residues 217 to 224 around Ca2 site. Another construct HlH5cs-IlC9Ca (SEQ ID NO:46) has I1C9 peptide replacing a longer peptide EIAIRPKVRDQE at residues 213 to 224 of Ca2. Other constructs have I1C9 peptide individually replacing a Ca2 site, HAGAKS, that corresponds to the Site A of H3 HA, an Sa site KKGNS, and an Sa site KTSS. Each of the Clal-Nsil fragments with the changes was synthesized and subcloned between Clal and Nsil sites of H1TEV2 to generate a HA construct denoted as HlTEV2-IlC9Cal (SEQ ID NO:35), HlTEV2-IlC9Ca2 (SEQ ID NO:38), HlTEV2-lC9Sa3 (SEQ ID NO:40), and HlTEV2-IlC9Sa4 (SEQ ID NO:42), respectively. The Clal-Nsil fragment with the change of IlC9Ca was synthesized and subcloned between Clal and Nsil sites of HlH5cs to generate a HA construct HlH5cs-IlC9Ca. The I1C9 peptide also replaced residues TSADQQSLYQNA of Sb site of HlH5cs construct as HlH5cs-IlC9Sb (SEQ ID NO:44) by the same method. The Sb site corresponds to the Site B helix of H3 HA.

[0129] The Clal-Nsil fragment was gene synthesized with the FI6 epitope peptide

RKKRGLFGAIAGFIE (SEQ ID NO:49) placed at the Sa site and the coiled-coil FI6 epitope peptide KESTQKAIDGVTNKVNS (SEQ ID NO:50) placed at the Sb site. This Clal-Nsil fragment with FI6 substitutions was subcloned between Clal and Nsil sites of HlH5cs and HIWT, resulting constructs HlH5cs-FI6Sab (SEQ ID NO:48) and HlWT-FI6Sab (SEQ ID NO:52), respectively. Another Clal-Nsil fragment was gene synthesized with the FI6 epitope peptide

RKKRGLFGAIAGFIE (SEQ ID NO:49) placed at the Sa site. This fragment replaced the Clal-Nsil fragment of H1TEV1 to generate construct HlTEVl-FI6Sa (SEQ ID NO:54).

Example 4

Design and Construction of HI HA Constructs with M2e Peptide at Antigenic Sites in

Globular Head Domain

[0130] In this example, again, the nucleotide sequence of Clal-Nsil fragment was replaced by nucleotide sequences wherein a portion of the Ca2 site or of the Sb site was replaced by the nucleotide sequence encoding the M2e peptide. The constructs with M2e peptides are listed in Table 2. The positions of these modifications are illustrated in Figure 5.

[0131] Gene synthesis generated Clal-Nsil fragments with M2e peptide (SEQ ID NO:57) replacing EIAIRPKVRDQE at the Ca2 site or replacing helix of residues TSADQQSLYQNA of Sb site. HA constructs with M2e peptide were first made in HlH5cs, in which the Clal-Nsil fragment of HlH5cs was replaced with individual Clal-Nsil fragment containing M2e peptide, resulting constructs HlH5cs-M2eCa (SEQ ID NO:56) and HlH5cs-M2eSb (SEQ ID NO:59), respectively. To transfer the Clal-Nsil fragment of HlH5cs-M2eCa to H1TEV2 construct, the Clal-Nsil fragment of HlH5cs-M2eCa was isolated and subcloned between Clal and Nsil sites of H1TEV2, resulting a construct named HlTEV2-M2eCa (SEQ ID NO:61).

Example 5

Generation of Recombinant Baculoviruses using Bac-to-Bac Baculovirus Expression Systems

[0132] This example describes techniques for preparing insect cells comprising the expression systems contained in the constructs prepared in Examples 1-4.

[0133] Recombinant baculoviruses were generated from the pFastBacbased transfer vectors of the constructs following the manufacturer's instruction (Bac-to-Bac Baculovirus Expression Systems, Life Technology, Carlsbad, CA, USA). Briefly, transfer vectors were transformed to E. coli DHlOBac chemically competent cells. White colonies with recombinant bacmids were selected on plates with Blue-gal. Bacmid DNA was isolated by standard alkaline lysis miniprep method following the manufacturer's instruction. Recombinant bacmids were identified by PCR using the Ml 3 Forward (-40) primer (GTTTTCCCAGTCACGAC) and Ml 3 Reverse primer (C AGGAAAC AGCT ATGAC) . Recombinant bacmids gave a PCR product of about 4 kb.

[0134] SF9 insect cells attached to 12-well plates were transfected with the recombinant bacmids using Cellfectin® Reagent, other commercially available transfection reagents, or polyethylenimine (PEI). After 4-7 days post transfection or when the SF9 cells enlarged due to virus infection, the cell culture media were harvested as P0 viral stocks. Each P0 viral stock was used to infect 50 ml of SF9 cells at a density of 2 x 106 cells/ml in shaker flasks to amplify the viruses. The cultures were monitored using Cedex Cell Counter (Roche Diagnostics Corporation, Indianapolis, IN, USA). The harvest time was determined by the average viable cell size and cell viability. When the average viable cell sizes were 4-7 μιη larger than uninfected cells and viabilities were in the range of 50-70% in 4-5 days post infection, cells were removed by centrifugation and cell culture supernatants were collected and stored at 4°C in the dark as PI viral stocks. Sometimes the viral stocks were filtered through 0.2 μιη sterile filter to maintain sterility.

[0135] To further amplify viral stocks, 500 ml of SF9 cells at a density of 2 x 106 cells/ml were infected with 250 μΐ PI viral stock. The cultures were monitored using Cedex Cell Counter. When the average viable cell sizes were 4-7 μιη larger than uninfected cells and viabilities were in the range of 50-70% in 4-5 days post infection, cells were removed by centrifugation and cell culture supernatants were collected and stored at 4°C in the dark as P2 viral stocks. Sometimes the viral stocks were filtered through 0.2 μιη sterile filter to maintain sterility.

Example 6

Expression of Recombinant HA proteins.

[0136] This example demonstrates expression in insect cells of the various constructs described in Examples 1-4. Depending on the specific construct, various levels of target protein expression were obtained.

[0137] To detect the expression of a recombinant HA, cell culture media of SF9 cells that were infected with the recombinant baculovirus stocks, usually the PI or P2 viral stocks as described in Example 5, were collected and incubated with Ni-NTA resins (Qiagen, Germantown, MD USA) for affinity capture through the lOxHis-tag of the recombinant HA. After washing the Ni-NTA resin with phosphate buffered saline (lxPBS), the Ni-NTA resins were boiled with gel loading buffer in the presence or absence of a reducing agent for analysis by SDS-PAGE or Western blot using anti-His antibodies. A protein band around 63 kDa on a Coomassie® stained

gel or anti-His Western blot indicates the expression of secreted recombinant HA full-length protein.

[0138] As shown in Figure 7 and Figure 8, the expression of HI HA protein of the parental construct H1WT was detected as expected. HA proteins with altered maturation cleavage site of polybasic residues, HlH5cs, HlR5cs, and HlIR5cs, expressed to the same level as H1WT.

H1TEV1, with the entire HI HA maturation cleavage site replaced by the TEV cleavage site, expressed much less than H1WT. By keeping more native residues at the maturation cleavage site, H1TEV2 and H1TEV3 expressed very well comparing to H1WT (Figure 7 and Figure 8). Not all substitutions expressed to the same level. By adjusting the location of TEV cleavage site in the constructs, expression level to that of the wild type HA was achieved.

[0139] Also shown in Figure 7 and Figure 8, placements of the same immunosubdominant bNAb epitope at different immunodominant antigenic sites resulted in different expression levels. Constructs of composite CR8020 epitope peptide at either Sa site (HlTEV2-CR8020Sa4) or at Ca2 site (HlH5cs-CR8020Ca) expressed to the same level as the wild type HA, whereas the H1TEV2-CR8020Sa3 construct did not express well. Thus the exact positions of the heterologous epitope placement could be important for the expression of the resulting HA. The nature of the

immunosubdominant bNAb epitopes may impact the expression levels of the resulting HA proteins as well.

[0140] Individual placement of I1C9 epitope at several antigenic sites also showed different levels of expression of the resulting HA proteins (Figure 7 and Figure 8). Construct HlH5cs-IlC9Ca showed higher expression than construct HlTEV2-IlC9Cal. The peptide sequences in the antigenic sites replaced by I1C9 epitope peptide in these two constructs are slightly different. Similar to those constructs with TEV cleavage site as MCS, the location of substitution affects the expression level.

[0141] Constructs with M2e peptide at Ca2 sites, namely HlH5cs-M2eCa and H1TEV2-M2eCa, gave expression as good as H1WT, regardless of the maturation cleavage sites (Figure 7 and Figure 8). However the construct HlH5cs-M2eSb with the M2e peptide at the Sb site did not express well. The Sb site is in a helical structure which may be required for proper folding of HA. [0142] The successful expression of many of the HI HA constructs demonstrated that the immunodominant antigenic sites of HA globular head domain can be replaced by

immunosubdominant bNAb epitopes from the stem domain or by an M2e peptide from anther protein not related to HA. These results revealed the plasticity of the globular head domain and validated the feasibility of making a functional HA to present heterologous epitopes in its globular head domain. Together, Examples 1-6 demonstrated methods to construct HAs with heterologous epitopes and/or altered MCS and to select the modified HAs with good expression.

Example 7

Purification of Recombinant HA Proteins

[0143] This example demonstrates the purification of the various constructs described in Examples 1-4.

[0144] In shaker flasks, 50 ml to 1 L of SF9 cells at a density of 2 x 106 cells/ml were infected with a baculovirus stock at a volumetric ratio of 1-4 ml PI or P2 viral stock to 1 liter of cells. The culture was monitored using Cedex Cell Counter. The harvest time was determined by the average viable cell size and cell viability. When the average viable cell sizes were 4-7 μιη larger than uninfected cells and viabilities were about 80% in 2 to 3 days post infection, cells were removed by centrifugation and conditioned cell culture media were collected and stored at 4°C. The conditioned cell culture media were incubated with Ni-NTA resins with rocking on a rotisserie platform for 2-4 hours at 4 °C. The Ni-NTA resins were collected by centrifugation and washed with IxPBS. The washed Ni-NTA resins were packed into a gravity flow column and further washed with IxPBS supplemented with 50 mM imidazole. The Ni-NTA resins were then eluted with 400 mM imidazole in IxPBS by gravity flow. The eluted HA proteins were buffer exchanged to IxPBS and concentrated by ultrafiltration. The purified HA proteins were analyzed by SDS-PAGE as shown in Figure 8.

APPENDIX

Description of Influenza Viruses, Types and Hosts

[0145] Influenza viruses consist of three genera of Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, which are influenzavirus A, B and C. Each genus has only a single species of viruses, namely influenza A, B, and C virus, respectively. Influenza A, B, and C viruses are also called type A, B, and C influenza viruses, respectively. Influenza viruses are enveloped negative-sense single stranded RNA viruses. The viral genome is encoded in separate RNA segments. Influenza A and B viruses each has 8 RNA segments that encode 10 proteins. Influenza C viruses each has 7 RNA segments that encode 9 proteins. The 10 characterized proteins of influenza A viruses are PB2, PB 1, and PA polymerases, hemagglutinin (HA), nucleoprotein (NP), neuraminidase (NA), matrix proteins Ml and M2, nonstructural proteins NS 1 and NS2 (Webster, R. G., et al, Microbiol Rev (1992) 56: 152-179). Influenza C viruses have a hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion (HEF) protein that combines the functions of HA and NA (Herrler, G., et al, J. Gen Virol (1988) 69:839-846).

Classification of Influenza A, B and C viruses is based on antigenic differences in their NP and matrix proteins.

[0146] Influenza A viruses are small particles of 80-120 nm in diameter that consist of a host-derived lipid bilayer envelope studded with the virus-encoded membrane proteins HA, NA, and M2, an inner shell made of Ml matrix protein, and the nucleocapsids of the viral genome of individual RNA segments at the center (Webster, R. G., et al, Microbiol Rev (1992) 56: 152-179). The RNA segments are loosely encapsidated by multiple NP molecules. Complexes of the three viral polymerase proteins (PB 1, PB2 and PA) are situated at the ends of the nucleocapsids. All RNA segments are necessary for producing an infectious virus particle.

[0147] RNA segment 1, the slowest-migrating RNA species by gel electrophoresis, encodes PB2 RNA polymerase. RNA segment 2 encodes PB 1 RNA polymerase, plus two other transcripts for PB 1-N40 and PB 1-F2 proteins by using different reading frames from the same RNA sequence. PB 1-N40 and PB 1-F2 proteins induce host cell apoptosis. RNA segment 3 encodes PA RNA polymerase that forms the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex with PB 1 and PB2. RNA segment 4 encodes HA, the major surface antigen of the influenza virion. Each virion has about 500 HA molecules that appears as uniformly distributed spikes on the virion surface (Ruigrok, R. W. H., et al, J. Gen Virol (1984) 65:799-902; Murti, K. G., and

Webster, R. G., Virol (1986) 149:36-43). Binding to the host receptors, HA determines the host range. RNA segment 5 encodes NP nucleoprotein. NP encapsidates viral RNA and is transported to host cell nucleus. NP is abundantly synthesized in infected cells and is the second most abundant protein in the influenza virus virion. It is a major target of the host cytotoxic T-cell immune response. RNA segment 6 encodes neuraminidase (NA), the second major surface antigen of the influenza virus virion. NA is an enzyme that cleaves terminal sialic acid from glycoproteins or glycolipids to release virus particles from host cell receptors. Its function is required for virus spread. Each virion has about 100 NA molecules on its surface. NA forms a tetramer and is located in discrete patches on the virion envelope (Murti, K. G., and Webster, R. G., Virol (1986) 149:36-43). RNA segment 7 is bicistronic and encodes both matrix proteins, Ml and M2. Ml forms a shell surrounding the virion nucleocapsids underneath the virion envelope and is the most abundant protein in the influenza virus virion. M2 is made from a different splicing form of the same transcript of Ml. M2 is an integral membrane protein and functions as a proton channel to control the pH of the Golgi network during the production of influenza virus in host cells. M2 can be partially replaced by an alternative splicing variant M42. About 3000 matrix protein molecules are needed to make one virion. RNA segment 8 encodes the two nonstructural proteins NS 1 and NS2 for virus replication. NS2 is from a different reading frame from NS 1.

Both proteins are abundant in the infected cell but are not incorporated into progeny virions.

[0148] Among the three genera of influenza viruses, influenza A viruses are the most virulent human pathogens and cause the most severe disease in human. Influenza A viruses are classified into subtypes based on the antigenic properties of their surface glycoproteins HA and NA. A total of 18 HA subtypes, named HI to H18, and 10 NA subtypes, named Nl to N10, have been identified (Tong, S., et ah, PLoS Pathogens (2013) 9:el003657). The common nomenclature for influenza A subtypes is derived from different combinations of HA subtype and NA subtype, such as H1N1, H3N2, and H7N9 {Bull World Health Organ (1980) 58: 585-591). Waterfowl is the natural reservoir of subtypes HI to H16 and Nl to N9. Subtypes H17N10 and H18N10 were recently discovered in American fruit bats. In nature, the segmented genome of influenza A viruses allows re-assortment of RNA segments when a host is co-infected with two subtypes of influenza A viruses. RNA segments from two different subtypes can be packaged in a single virion to produce a new subtype. Of these many subtypes of influenza A viruses, only H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 have developed the capacity for efficient transmission in humans. These three subtypes are the prevalent virus subtypes of the so called seasonal flu viruses. Human population is therefore immunologically naive to many influenza A subtypes. Occasionally other subtypes influenza A viruses cross species and infect humans to cause pandemic outbreaks with high fatality. [0149] Based on their phylogenetic relationship, influenza A HA subtypes are clustered into two distinct groups. Group 1 includes 10 of the 16 subtypes: HI, H2, H5, H6, H8, H9, Hl l, H12, H13, and H16. Group 2 accounts for the remaining 6 subtypes: H3, H4, H7, H10, H14, and H15.

[0150] Influenza B viruses are antigenically distinct from influenza A viruses. Influenza B viruses co-circulate with type A viruses and cause epidemics in human. Influenza B viruses are stably adapted to humans without a known animal reservoir. Unlike the vast genetic variations of HA of influenza A viruses, only one serotype of HA is reported in influenza B viruses, although three lineages are defined by phylogenetic relationships of the HA genes. Influenza B viruses do not appear to recombine with influenza A viruses as there has been no report of re-assortment of RNA segments between influenza A and influenza B viruses.

[0151] Both influenza A and B viruses use terminal sialic acid on host cell surface as the cellular receptor. HAs of both types of viruses share the same structural features and bind to the sialic acid receptor for entry to host cells.

[0152] Subtypes of influenza A and influenza B viruses are further classified into strains. There are many different strains of influenza A and influenza B viruses. Each flu season is dominated by a few strains of influenza A and B viruses that usually differ genetically from the strains of the previous flu season. Viruses of one strain isolated at different geographic locations or time of a flu season, known as isolates, often have genetic changes.

[0153] Infection of influenza C viruses is generally asymptomatic or causes mild illness involving mostly children or young adults. Influenza C viruses are associated with sporadic cases and minor localized outbreaks. Influenza C viruses pose much less of a disease burden than influenza A and B viruses. Large proportion of human population shows seroconversion, which suggests wide circulation of influenza C viruses in human population. Influenza C viruses have also been isolated from animals. The hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion (HEF) protein of influenza C virus combines the function of HA and NA of the influenza A and B viruses. Unlike HA of influenza A and B viruses, HEF of influenza C virus uses terminal 9-O-acetyl-N-acetylneuraminic acid (9-O-Ac-NeuAc) as the cellular receptor (Herrler, G., et al, EMBO J. (1985) 4: 1503-1506).

Description of Virus Infection Process and Life Cycle

[0154] Influenza viruses are spread from person to person through respiratory droplets or fomites (any object or substance capable of carrying infectious organisms). The viruses infect the epithelial cells of the respiratory tract. After binding to cell surface receptors, the attached virion is endocytosed by the host cell to the endosomes where the low pH triggers a conformational change of HA that leads to insertion of its hydrophobic fusion peptide into the vesicular membrane of the host cell and initiate fusion of the viral and vesicular membranes. Fusion releases the contents of the virion into the cytoplasm of the infected cell. The viral nucleocapsids migrate into the host cell nucleus, and their associated polymerase complexes begin primary transcription of mRNA for translation of viral proteins. At the same time, translation of host mRNAs is blocked. Newly synthesized viral RNAs are encapsidated and viral structural proteins are synthesized and transported to the host cell surface, where they integrate into the host cell membrane. Influenza viruses bud from the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells, such as bronchial epithelial cells, into lumen of lungs and are therefore usually pneumotropic (Roth, M. G., et ah, PNAS (1979) 76: 6430-6434; Nayak, D. P., et al, Virus Res (2009) 143: 147-161). Transmission of influenza virus between pigs and humans has been demonstrated. After an individual becomes infected, the immune system develops antibodies against the influenza virus. This is the body's main source of protection.

SEQUENCE LISTING

SEQ ID NO: l: Peptide sequence of HA of A/California/07/2009, a swine-origin influenza A virus H1N1 strain (UniProt:C3W5X2)

MKAILVVLLYTFATANADTLCIGYHANNSTDTVDTVLEKNVTVTHSVNLLEDKHNGKLC

KLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYIVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEELREQ

LSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVKKGNSYPKLSKSY

INDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPKVRDQEG

RMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQTPKGAI

NTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIPSIQSRGLFGAIAGFIEGGWTGMVDGW

YGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHLEKRIENLN

KKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEIGNGCFEF

YHKCDNTCMES VKNGT YD YPKYS EE AKLNREEID G VKLES TRIYQILAIYS TV AS S LVLV V

SLGAISFWMCSNGSLQCRICI

SEQ ID NO:2: Peptide sequence of GP67 secretion signal (GP67ss)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF A

SEQ ID NO:3: Peptide sequence of TEV cleavage site, foldon, and lOxHis-tag

GAENLYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH SEQ ID NO:4: Peptide sequence of TEV cleavage site

ENLYFQG

SEQ ID NO:5: Peptide sequence of foldon

GSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFL SEQ ID NO:6: Peptide sequence of lOxHis-tag

HHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:7: Peptide sequence of signal peptide of HA of A/California/07/2009

(UniProt:C3W5X2)

MKAILVVLLYTFATANA

SEQ ID NO:8: Peptide sequence of HI HA maturation cleavage site (MCS)

IPSIQSR

SEQ ID NO:9: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlWT-TEV-foldon-10His (H1WT)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPKVRD

QEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQTP

KGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIPSIQSRGLFGAIAGFIEGGWTGMV

DGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHLEKRI

ENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEIGNG

CFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLYFQGGS

GYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO: 10: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlWT-TEV-foldon-10His (H1WT) ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACT

ACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGG

TGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTC

TGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAAT

ACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATG

TGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATATCCCTAGCATCCAGA

GCAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGG

TGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCG

ATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGA

TCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGA

AGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCT

ACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACA

GCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAG

GAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGT

CTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATA

GAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAA

AACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGG

CTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCAT

CACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO: l l: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPKVRD

QEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQTP

KGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPQRERRKKRGLFGAIAGFIEGGW

TGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNH

LEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAK

EIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLY

FQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO: 12: Peptide sequence of H5 maturation cleavage site

QRERRKKR

SEQ ID NO: 13: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs) ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACT

ACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGG

TGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTC

TGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAAT

ACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATG

TGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATAGCCCTCAGAGGGAGA

GACGCAAGAAGAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGA

CCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGAT

ATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGA

ACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACC

ACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATA

TTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTA

CCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACA

ATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTG

TATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAA

GCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGG

GCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGA

CGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGT

CACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO: 14: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlR5cs-TEV-foldon-10His (HlR5cs)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPKVRD

QEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQTP

KGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIPRRRRRGLFGAIAGFIEGGWTGM

VDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHLEKR

IENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEIGN

GCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLYFQGG

SGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO: 15: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlR5cs-TEV-foldon-10His (HlR5cs) ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACT

ACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGG

TGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTC

TGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAAT

ACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATG

TGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATATCCCTAGGAGACGCA

GAAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGG

TGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCG

ATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGA

TCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGA

AGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCT

ACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACA

GCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAG

GAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGT

CTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATA

GAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAA

AACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGG

CTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCAT

CACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO: 16: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlIR5cs-TEV-foldon-10His (HlIR5cs)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPKVRD

QEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQTP

KGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIPSIQSRRRRRGLFGAIAGFIEGGW

TGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNH

LEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAK

EIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLY

FQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO: 17: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlIR5cs-TEV-foldon-10His (HlIR5cs) ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACT

ACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGG

TGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTC

TGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAAT

ACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATG

TGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATATCCCTAGCATCCAGA

GCAGGAGACGCAGAAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGAT

GGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCG

GATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGG

TGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCA

ACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGG

ATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGA

CTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAA

CAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACAC

CTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGC

CAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCA

GGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGT

GACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGG

GTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO: 18: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEVl-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV1)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYIVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPKVRD

QEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQTP

KGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIENLYFQGLFGAIAGFIEGGWTGM

VDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHLEKR

IENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEIGN

GCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLYFQGG

SGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO: 19: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEVl-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV1) ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACT

ACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGG

TGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTC

TGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAAT

ACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATG

TGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATATCGAAAACCTGTATT

TTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGGT

GGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCGA

TCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGAT

CGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAA

GAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCTA

CAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACAG

CAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAGG

AGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGTC

TGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAG

AGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAA

ACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGC

TTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCATC

ACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:20: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPKVRD

QEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQTP

KGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPENLYFQGLFGAIAGFIEGGWTG

MVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHLE

KRffiNLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEI

GNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLYFQ

GGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:21: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2) ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACT

ACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGG

TGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTC

TGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAAT

ACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATG

TGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATAGCCCTGAAAACCTGT

ATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAAT

GGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGC

CGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGT

GATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGA

GAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGAC

CTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGA

CAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCA

AGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGA

GTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAA

TAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGA

AAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAG

GCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATC

ATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:22: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV3-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV3)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYIVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPKVRD

QEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQTP

KGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIPSIENLYFQGLFGAIAGFIEGGWT

GMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHL

EKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEI

GNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLYFQ

GGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:23: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV3-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV3) ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACT

ACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGG

TGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTC

TGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAAT

ACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATG

TGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATATCCCTAGCATCGAAA

ACCTGTATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGAC

CGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATA

TGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGAA

CAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCA

CCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATAT

TTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTAC

CACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAA

TGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGT

ATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAG

CTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGC

GCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACG

GTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCA

CCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:24: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-CR8020Ca-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-CR8020Ca)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEGMIDYEG1

GQAAGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQ

TPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPORERRKKRGLFGAIAGFIEGG

WTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFN

HLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNA

KEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENL

YFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:25: Peptide sequence of CR8020 epitope of HA2 residues 15-19

EGMID

SEQ ID NO:26: Peptide sequence of CR8020 epitope of HA2 residues 30-36

EGTGQAA

SEQ ID NO:27: Peptide sequence of composite C8020 epitope

EGMID YEGTGQAA

SEQ ID NO:28: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-CR8020Ca-TEV-foldon-10His

(HlH5cs-CR8020Ca)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTGAAGGCATGATTGATTACGAAGGCACAGGCCAGGCAGCCGGCAGAATGAATT

ACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCT

GGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATC

TCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTA

ATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTA

TGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATAGCCCTCAGAGGGA

GAGACGCAAGAAGAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATG

GACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGG

ATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGT

GAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAA

CCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGA

TATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGAC

TACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAAC

AATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCT

GTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCA

AGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAG

GGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTG

ACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGG

TCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:29: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-CR8020Ca-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-CR8020Ca)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEGMIDYEG1

GQAAGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQ

TPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPENLYFQGLFGAIAGFIEGGWT

GMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHL

EKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEI

GNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLYFQ

GGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:30: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-CR8020Ca-TEV-foldon-10His

(HlTEV2-CR8020Ca)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCcTCTGCAcCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCaCaAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGTA

CCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCAA

GCCTGAAGGCATGATTGATTACGAAGGCACAGGCCAGGCAGCCGGCAGAATGAATTA

CTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTG

GTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCT

CTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAA

TACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTAT

GTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATAGCCCTGAAAACCTG

TATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAA

TGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCG

CCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGtGAACAGCG

TGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGG

AGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGA

CCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACG

ACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCC

AAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGG

AGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGA

ATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTG

AAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCA

GGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCAT

CATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:31: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-CR8020Sa3-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-CR8020Sa3)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVEGMIDYEGTG

OAAYPKLSKSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEI

AIRPKVRDQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHD

CNTTCQTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPENLYFQGLFGAIAGF

IEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVG

KEFNHLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQL

KNNAKEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQG

AENLYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:32: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-CR8020Sa3-TEV-foldon-10His (HlTEV2-CR8020Sa3)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGGAAG

GCATGATTGATTACGAAGGCACAGGCCAGGCAGCCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCT

ACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCA

CAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGTACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAG

CAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCAAGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGA

TCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCAC

ATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAAT

GCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCA

GACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACC

ATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTG

AGAAATAGCCCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTA

TTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATG

AGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGA

TCACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGG

GCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGAC

GACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATG

AGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAA

GCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACA

AGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGT

ATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGC

ACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCC

CGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCT

GTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:33: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-CR8020Sa4-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-CR8020Sa4)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYIVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPEGMIDYEGTGQAAWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLV

KKGNS YPKLS KS YINDKGKE VLVLWGIHHPS TS ADQQS LYQN AD A Y VF VGS S R YS KKFKP

EIAIRPKVRDQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVH

DCNTTCQTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPENLYFQGLFGAIA

GFIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTA

VGKEFNHLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRS

QLKNNAKEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIY

QGAENLYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:34: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-CR8020Sa4-TEV-foldon-10His (HlTEV2-CR8020Sa4)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTGAAGGCATGATTGATTACGAAGGCACAGGCCAGGCAGCCTGGCCTAAT

CACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCCGCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTT

ACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGAAGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGA

GCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTA

GCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGTACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGG

CAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCAAGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAG

AGATCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGAT

CACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGA

AATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTG

TCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATC

ACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGT

CTGAGAAATAGCCCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCT

TTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGA

ATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACG

AGATCACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTG

TGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTG

GACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGA

ATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGA

GAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACC

ACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTA

AGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAA AGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACA TCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCT GCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:35: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Cal-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-IlC9Cal)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIGjFGAIA

GFIEGGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQ

TPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPENLYFQGLFGAIAGFIEGGWT

GMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHL

EKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEI

GNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLYFQ

GGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:36: Peptide sequence of I1C9

GIFGAIAGFIEG

SEQ ID NO:37: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Cal-TEV-foldon-10His

(HlTEV2-IlC9Cal)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTGAAATTGCCATTGGCATTTTCGGCGCTATCGCCGGCTTCATTGAGGGAGGCAG

AATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACC

GGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCA

TCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGG

CGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGT

CCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATAGCCCT

GAAAACCTGTATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGAT

GGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCG

GATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGG

TGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCA

ACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGG

ATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGA

CTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAA

CAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACAC

CTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGC

CAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCA GGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGT GACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGG GTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:38: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Ca2-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-IlC9Ca2)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPGIFGAIAGFIEGFYKNLrWLVKKGNS

YPKLSKSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRP

KVRDQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTT

CQTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPENLYFQGLFGAIAGFIEGG

WTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFN

HLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNA

KEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENL

YFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:39: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Ca2-TEV-foldon-10His

(HlTEV2-IlC9Ca2)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTGGCATTTTCGGCGCTATCGCCGGCTTCATTGAGGGATTTTACAAGAACCT

GATCTGGCTGGTGAAGAAGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAA

CGACAAGGGCAAAGAAGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGC

CGATCAGCAGAGCCTGTACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAG

ATACAGCAAAAAGTTCAAGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAGGA

AGGCAGAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGA

GGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGC

TCTGGCATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACC

TAAGGGCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGC

AAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAAT

AGCCCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGG

GAGGATGGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGG

GATCCGGATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAA

ACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGG

AGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCT

TCCTGGATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAAC

CCTGGACTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCT

GAAGAACAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGA

CAACACCTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGA

GGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAA

TCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGC

TCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACC TTCCTGGGTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:40: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Sa3-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-IlC9Sa3)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVGJFGAIAGFIE

G YPKLS KS YINDKGKE VLVLWGIHHPS TS ADQQS LYQN AD A Y VF VGS S RYS KKFKPEIAIR

PKVRDQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNT

TCQTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPENLYFQGLFGAIAGFIEG

GWTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEF

NHLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNN

AKEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAEN

LYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:41: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Sa3-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-IlC9Sa3)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGGGCA

TTTTCGGCGCTATCGCCGGCTTCATTGAGGGATACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACAT

CAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAG

CGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGTACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGC

AGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCAAGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAG

GAAGGCAGAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTT

GAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCT

GGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGA

CACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCAT

CGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAG

AAATAGCCCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATT

GAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAG

CAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATC

ACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGC

AAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGA

CGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAG

AGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGC

CAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAG

TGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATA

GCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACA

AGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGG

AAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTC

TACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:42: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Sa4-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-IlC9Sa4)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPGIFGAIAGFIEGWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKG

NS YPKLS KS YIND KGKE VLVLWGIHHPS TS ADQQS LYQN AD A Y VFVGS S R YS KKFKPEIAI

RPKVRDQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCN

TTCQTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPENLYFQGLFGAIAGFIE

GGWTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKE

FNHLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKN

NAKEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAE

NLYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:43: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-IlC9Sa4-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-IlC9Sa4)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTGGCATTTTCGGCGCTATCGCCGGCTTCATTGAGGGATGGCCTAATCAC

GATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCCGCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACA

AGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGAAGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCT

ACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCA

CAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGTACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAG

CAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCAAGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGA

TCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCAC

ATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAAT

GCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCA

GACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACC

ATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTG

AGAAATAGCCCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTA

TTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATG

AGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGA

TCACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGG

GCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGAC

GACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATG

AGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAA

GCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACA

AGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGT

ATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGC

ACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCC

CGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCT

GTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:44: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-IlC9Sb-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-IlC9Sb)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSGIFGAIAGFIEGDAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPKVRDQE

GRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTCQTPKG

AINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPQRERRKKRGLFGAIAGFIEGGWTG

MVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHLE

KRffiNLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEI

GNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLYFQ

GGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:45: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-IlC9Sb-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-IlC9Sb)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCGGCATTTTCGGCGCTATCGCCGGCTT

CATtGAGGGAGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCAAG

CCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACTAC

TGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTG

GTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCTG

ATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATAC

CAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTG

AAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATAGCCCTCAGAGGGAGAGA

CGCAAGAAGAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACC

GGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATAT

GCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGAAC

AGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCAC

CTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATT

TGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACC

ACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAAT

GCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTA

TGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGC

TGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGC

GCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACG

GTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCA

CCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:46: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-IlC9Ca-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-IlC9Ca)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPGJFGAIAGFIE

GGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLV VPRYAFAMERNAGS GUIS DTPVHDCNTTCQTPK

GAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPQRERRKKRGLFGAIAGFIEGGWT

GMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHL

EKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEI

GNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLYFQ

GGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:47: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-IlC9Ca-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-IlC9Ca)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTGGCATTTTCGGCGCTATCGCCGGCTTCATTGAGGGAGGCAGAATGAATTACTA

CTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGT

GGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCT

GATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATA

CCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGT

GAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATAGCCCTCAGAGGGAGAG

ACGCAAGAAGAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGAC

CGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGcTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATA

TGCCGCCGATCtGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGAAC

AGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCAC

CTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATT

TGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACC

ACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAAT

GCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTA

TGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGC

TGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGC

GCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACG

GTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCA

CCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:48: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-FI6Sab-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-FKSab)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVRKKRGLFGAI

AGFIEYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSKESTQKAIDGVTNKVNSDAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIA

IRPKVRDQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDC

NTTCQTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPQRERRKKRGLFGAIA

GFIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTA

VGKEFNHLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRS

QLKNNAKEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIY

QGAENLYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:49: Peptide sequence of maturation cleavage site of FI6 epitope

RKKRGLFGAIAGFIE

SEQ ID NO:50: Peptide sequence of helix coiled-coil peptide of FI6 epitope

KESTQKAIDGVTNKVNS

SEQ ID NO:51: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-FI6Sab-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-FKSab)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAGAA

AGAAGAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGTACATCAACGACAAGG

GCAAAGAAGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCAAGGAGTCTACACAGA

AGGCCATTGATGGCGTTACAAATAAGGTCAATtCTGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGC

AGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCAAGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGAT

CAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACA

TTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATG

CTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAG

ACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCA

TCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGA

GAAATAGCCCTCAGAGGGAGAGACGCAAGAAGAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCG

GCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACC

AGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCG

ACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAG

CTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAA

GTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGG

AGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGG

TGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCT

ACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACC

CTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTG

GAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTT

ACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGG

TTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAA

aagctt

SEQ ID NO:52: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlWT-FI6Sab-TEV-foldon-10His (HlWT-FI6Sab)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVRKKRGLFGAI

AGFIEYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSKESTQKAIDGVTNKVNSDAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIA

IRPKVRDQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDC

NTTCQTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIPSIQSRGLFGAIAGFIEG

GWTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEF

NHLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNN

AKEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAEN

LYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:53: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlWT-FI6Sab-TEV-foldon-10His (H1WT-FKSab)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAGAA

AGAAGAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGTACATCAACGACAAGG

GCAAAGAAGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCAAGGAGTCTACACAGA

AGGCCATTGATGGCGTTACAAATAAGGTCAATTCTGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAG

CAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCAAGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGA

TCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCAC

ATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAAT

GCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCA

GACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACC

ATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTG

AGAAATATCCCTAGCATCCAGAGCAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTG

AGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGC

AGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCA

CAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCA

AGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGAC

GGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGA

GAACCCTGGACTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCC

AGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGT

GTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATA

GCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACA

AGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGG

AAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTC

TACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:54: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEVl-FI6Sa-TEV-foldon-10His (HlTEVl-FI6Sa)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVRKKRGLFGAI

AGFIEGYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPEIAIRPK

VRDQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHDCNTTC

QTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNIENLYFQGLFGAIAGFIEGGWT

GMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTAVGKEFNHL

EKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRSQLKNNAKEI

GNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIYQGAENLYFQ

GGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:55: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEVl-FI6Sa-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV1-FI6Sa)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAGAA

AGAAGAGAGGCCTGTTCGGCGCTATCGCCGGCTTCATTGAGGGATACATCAACGACA

AGGGCAAAGAAGTGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATC

AGCAGAGCCTGTACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACA

GCAAAAAGTTCAAGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGAGATCAGGAAGGCA

GAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATCACATTTGAGGCCAC

CGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAAATGCTGGCTCTGGC

ATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGTCAGACACCTAAGG

GCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCACCATCGGCAAGTG

TCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCTGAGAAATATCGA

AAACCTGTATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGG

ACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGA

TATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTG

AACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAAC

CACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGAT

ATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACT

ACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAAC

AATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCT

GTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCA

AGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAG

GGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTG

ACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGG

TCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt

SEQ ID NO:56: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-M2eCa2-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-M2eCa)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLIWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPSLLTEVETPT

RNGWECKCSDSGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVH

DCNTTCQTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPQRERRKKRGLFGA

IAGFIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFT

AVGKEFNHLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVR

SQLKNNAKEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRI

YQGAENLYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:57: Peptide sequence of M2e peptide

S LLTE VETPTRNGWECKC S DS

SEQ ID NO:58: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-M2eCa2-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-M2eCa)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTTCCCTGCTGACCGAGGTGGAGACCCCCACCAGGAACGGCTGGGAGTGCAAGT

GCTCCGACTCCGGCAGAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGAT

CACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGA

AATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTG

TCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATC

ACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGT

CTGAGAAATAGCCCTCAGAGGGAGAGACGCAAGAAGAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATC

GCCGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCAC

CACCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCC

ATCGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTT

ACAGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAG

AAAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCC

TGGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGA

AGGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGT

TCTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTA

CCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACT

GGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGT

TACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGG

GTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATA

Aaagctt

SEQ ID NO:59: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-M2eSb-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-M2eSb)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KS YINDKGKE VLVLWGIHHPS S LLTE VETPTRNGWECKC S DS D A YVF VGS S RYS KKFKPEI

AIRPKVRDQEGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVHD

CNTTCQTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPQRERRKKRGLFGAI

AGFIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFT

AVGKEFNHLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVR

SQLKNNAKEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRI

YQGAENLYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:60: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlH5cs-M2eSb-TEV-foldon-10His (HlH5cs-M2eSb)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCTCCCTGCTGACCGAGGTGGAGACCCC

CACCAGGAACGGCTGGGAGTGCAAGTGCTCCGACTCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGC

AGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCAAGCCTGAAATTGCCATTAGACCCAAAGTGAGA

GATCAGGAAGGCAGAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGATC

ACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGAA

ATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTGT

CAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATCA

CCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGTCT

GAGAAATAGCCCTCAGAGGGAGAGACGCAAGAAGAGAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGC

CGGCTTTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCA

CCAGAATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCAT

CGACGAGATCACAAACAAGGTGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTAC

AGCTGTGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGA

AAGTGGACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCT

GGAGAATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAA

GGTGAGAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTT

CTACCACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTA

CCCTAAGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACT

GGAAAGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGT

TACATCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGG

GTTCTGCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATA

Aaagctt

SEQ ID NO:61: Peptide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-M2eCa2-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-M2eCa)

MVS AIVLY VLLA A A AHS AF ADTLCIG YH ANNS TDT VDT VLEKN VT VTHS VNLLEDKHNG

KLCKLRGVAPLHLGKCNIAGWILGNPECESLSTASSWSYrVETPSSDNGTCYPGDFIDYEEL

REQLSSVSSFERFEIFPKTSSWPNHDSNKGVTAACPHAGAKSFYKNLrWLVKKGNSYPKLS

KSYINDKGKEVLVLWGIHHPSTSADQQSLYQNADAYVFVGSSRYSKKFKPSLLTEVETPT

RNGWECKCSDSGRMNYYWTLVEPGDKITFEATGNLVVPRYAFAMERNAGSGIIISDTPVH

DCNTTCQTPKGAINTSLPFQNIHPITIGKCPKYVKSTKLRLATGLRNSPENLYFQGLFGAIA

GFIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHHQNEQGSGYAADLKSTQNAIDEITNKVNSVIEKMNTQFTA

VGKEFNHLEKRIENLNKKVDDGFLDIWTYNAELLVLLENERTLDYHDSNVKNLYEKVRS

QLKNNAKEIGNGCFEFYHKCDNTCMESVKNGTYDYPKYSEEAKLNREEIDGVKLESTRIY

QGAENLYFQGGSGYIPEAPRDGQAYVRKDGEWVLLSTFLGHHHHHHHHHH

SEQ ID NO:62: Nucleotide sequence of GP67ss-HlTEV2-M2eCa2-TEV-foldon-10His (H1TEV2-M2eCa)

ccATGGTAAGCGCTATTGTTTTATATGTGCTTTTGGCGGCGGCGGCGCATTCTGCCTTTG

CGGATACACTGTGTATTGGCTACCACGCCAACAATAGCACCGATACCGTGGATACAGT

GCTGGAGAAGAATGTGACCGTGACCCACTCTGTGAATCTGCTGGAGGATAAGCACAA

TGGCAAGCTGTGTAAGCTGAGAGGAGTTGCCCCTCTGCACCTGGGCAAATGTAATATT

GCCGGCTGGATTCTGGGAAATCCTGAATGTGAAAGCCTGTCTACAGCCAGCAGCTGGT

CTTATATCGTGGAAACCCCTAGCAGCGACAATGGCACCTGTTACCCTGGCGACTTCAT

CGATTACGAGGAGCTGAGAGAACAGCTGTCTAGCGTGTCCAGCTTCGAGAGATTCGA

GATCTTCCCTAAGACAAGCAGCTGGCCTAATCACGATTCTAATAAGGGAGTGACAGCC

GCCTGTCCTCATGCCGGAGCCAAGTCCTTTTACAAGAACCTGATCTGGCTGGTGAAGA

AGGGCAACAGCTACCCTAAGCTGTCTAAGAGCTACATCAACGACAAGGGCAAAGAAG

TGCTGGTGCTGTGGGGAATCCACCACCCTAGCACAAGCGCCGATCAGCAGAGCCTGT

ACCAGAATGCCGATGCCTATGTGTTTGTGGGCAGCAGCAGATACAGCAAAAAGTTCA

AGCCTTCCCTGCTGACCGAGGTGGAGACCCCCACCAGGAACGGCTGGGAGTGCAAGT

GCTCCGACTCCGGCAGAATGAATTACTACTGGACCCTGGTGGAACCTGGCGATAAGAT

CACATTTGAGGCCACCGGAAATCTGGTGGTGCCTAGATATGCATTTGCTATGGAGAGA

AATGCTGGCTCTGGCATCATTATCTCTGATACCCCTGTGCACGACTGTAATACCACCTG

TCAGACACCTAAGGGCGCCATTAATACCAGCCTGCCCTTCCAGAATATTCACCCTATC

ACCATCGGCAAGTGTCCTAAGTATGTGAAGAGCACCAAGCTGAGACTGGCTACCGGT

CTGAGAAATAGCCCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAAGGCCTGTTTGGAGCCATCGCCGGCT

TTATTGAGGGAGGATGGACCGGAATGGTGGATGGCTGGTACGGCTATCACCACCAGA

ATGAGCAGGGATCCGGATATGCCGCCGATCTGAAGTCTACACAGAACGCCATCGACG

AGATCACAAACAAGGtGAACAGCGTGATCGAGAAGATGAACACCCAGTTTACAGCTG

TGGGCAAGGAGTTCAACCACCTGGAGAAGAGAATCGAGAACCTGAACAAGAAAGTG

GACGACGGCTTCCTGGATATTTGGACCTACAATGCCGAGCTGCTCGTGCTCCTGGAGA

ATGAGAGAACCCTGGACTACCACGACAGCAATGTGAAGAACCTGTACGAGAAGGTGA

GAAGCCAGCTGAAGAACAATGCCAAGGAGATCGGCAACGGCTGCTTTGAGTTCTACC

ACAAGTGTGACAACACCTGTATGGAGTCTGTGAAGAACGGCACCTACGACTACCCTA

AGTATAGCGAGGAGGCCAAGCTGAATAGAGAGGAGATCGACGGCGTGAAACTGGAA

AGCACAAGAATCTATCAGGGCGCTGAAAACCTGTATTTTCAGGGCGGTTCTGGTTACA

TCCCGGAAGCTCCGCGTGACGGTCAGGCTTACGTTCGTAAAGACGGTGAATGGGTTCT

GCTGTCTACCTTCCTGGGTCACCATCATCACCACCATCACCATCATCACTGATAAaagctt