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1. (WO2016210146) CRYSTALLINE SOLID FORMS OF THE ACETATE SALT OF (1S,3S,4R)-4-((3AS,4R,5S,7AS)-4-(AMINOMETHYL)-7A-METHYL-1-METHYLENEOCTAHYDRO-1H-INDEN-5-YL)-3-(HYDROXYMETHYL)-4-METHYLCYCLOHEXANOL
Note: Text based on automatic Optical Character Recognition processes. Please use the PDF version for legal matters

CRYSTALLI N E SOLI D FORMS OF TH E ACETATE SALT OF (1 S,3S,4 )-4- ((3AS,4 ,5S,7AS)-4-(AM I NOM ETHYL)-7A-M ETHYL-1-M ETHYLEN EOCTAHYDRO- 1H-I N DEN-5-YL)-3-(HYDROXYM ETHYL)-4-M ETHYLCYCLOH EXANOL

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is generally directed to novel crystalline forms of the acetate salt of (1 S,3S,4 )-4-((3aS,4 ,5S,7aS)-4-(aminomethyl)-7a-methyl-1-methyleneoctahydro-1 /-/-inden-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methylcyclohexanol, processes for their preparation, and pharmaceutical compositions containing them.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Dysregulated activation of the PI3K pathway contributes to

inflammatory/immune disorders and cancer. Efforts have been made to develop modulators of PI3K as well as downstream kinases (Workman et al., Nat. Biotechnol 24, 794-796, 2006; Simon, Cell 125, 647-649, 2006; Hennessy et al., Nat Rev Drug Discov 4, 988-1004, 2005; Knight et al., Cell 125, 733-747, 2006; Ong et al., Blood (2007), Vol. 110, No. 6, pp 1942-1949). A number of promising new PI3K isoform specific inhibitors with minimal toxicities have recently been developed and used in mouse models of inflammatory disease (Camps et al., Nat Med 1 1 , 936-943, 2005; Barber et ai, Nat Med 1 1 , 933-935, 2005) and glioma (Fan et al., Cancer Cell 9, 341-349, 2006). However, because of the dynamic interplay between phosphatases and kinases in regulating biological processes, inositol phosphatase activators represent a complementary, alternative approach to reduce PIP3 levels. Of the phosphoinositol phosphatases that degrade PIP3i SHIP1 is a particularly ideal target for development of therapeutics for treating immune and hemopoietic disorders because of its

hematopietic-restricted expression (Hazen et al., Blood 1 13, 2924-2933, 2009;

Rohrschneider et ai, Genes Dev. 14, 505-520, 2000).

Small molecule SHIP1 modulators have been disclosed, including

sesquiterpene compounds such as pelorol. Pelorol is a natural product isolated from the tropical marine sponge Dactylospongia elegans (Kwak et al., J Nat Prod 63, 1 153-1 156, 2000; Goclik et al., J Nat Prod 63, 1150-1152, 2000). Other reported SHIP1 modulators include the compounds set forth in PCT Published Patent Applications Nos. WO 2003/033517, WO 2004/035601 , WO 2004/092100, WO 2007/147251 , WO 2007/147252, WO 2011/069118, WO 2014/143561 and WO 2014/158654 and in U.S. Patent Nos. 7,601 ,874 and 7,999,010.

While significant strides have been made in this field, there remains a need for effective small molecule SHIP1 modulators.

One such molecule is the acetate salt of (1 S,3S,4 )-4-((3aS,4 ,5S,7aS)-4-(aminomethyl)-7a-methyl-1-methyleneoctahydro-1 /-/-inden-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methylcyclohexanol (referred to herein as Compound 1). Compound 1 is a compound with anti-inflammatory activity and is described in U.S. Patent Nos. 7,601 ,874 and 7,999,010, the relevant disclosures of which are incorporated in full by reference in their entirety, particularly with respect to the preparation of Compound 1 ,

pharmaceutical compositions comprising Compound 1 and methods of using

Compound 1.

Compound 1 has the molecular formula, C2oH36N02+ · C2H302", a molecular weight of 381.5 g/mole


Compound 1

Compound 1 is useful in treating disorders and conditions that benefit from SHIP1 modulation, such as cancers, inflammatory disorders and conditions and immune disorders and conditions. Compound 1 is also useful in the preparation of a medicament for the treatment of such disorders and conditions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is generally directed to novel crystalline forms of

Compound 1 , processes for their preparation, pharmaceutical compositions containing them and methods of using the novel crystalline forms and their compositions.

Accordingly, in one aspect, this invention is directed to a first novel crystalline form of Compound 1 , referred to herein as Compound 1 Form A.

In another aspect, this invention is directed to a second novel crystalline form of Compound 1 , referred to herein as Compound 1 Form B.

In another aspect, this invention is directed to compositions comprising a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient, carrier and/or diluent and Compound 1 Form A.

In another aspect, this invention is directed to compositions comprising a pharmaceutically acceptable excipient, carrier and/or diluent and Compound 1 Form B.

In another aspect, this invention is directed to a method for modulating SHIP1 activity in a mammal comprising administering an effective amount of Compound 1 Form A or an effective amount of a composition comprising Compound 1 Form A to the mammal in need thereof.

In another aspect, this invention is directed to a method for modulating SHIP1 activity in a mammal comprising administering an effective amount of Compound 1 Form B or an effective amount of a composition comprising Compound 1 Form B to the mammal in need thereof.

In another aspect, this invention is directed to a method for treating a disease, disorder or condition associated with SHIP1 activity in a mammal comprising administering an effective amount of Compound 1 Form A or an effective amount of a composition comprising Compound 1 Form A to the mammal in need thereof.

In another aspect, this invention is directed to a method for treating a disease, disorder or condition associated with SHIP1 activity in a mammal comprising administering an effective amount of Compound 1 Form B or an effective amount of a composition comprising Compound 1 Form B to the mammal in need thereof.

In another aspect, this invention is directed to methods for the preparation of Compound 1 Form A.

In another aspect, this invention is directed to methods for the preparation of Compound 1 Form B.

These aspects, and embodiments thereof, are described in more detail below. To this end, various references are set forth herein which describe in more detail certain background information, procedures, compounds and/or compositions, and are each hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

Figure 1 illustrates the X-Ray Powder Diffraction pattern of amorphous

Compound 1.

Figure 2 illustrates the X-Ray Powder Diffraction pattern of Compound 1

Form A.

Figure 3 illustrates the DSC thermogram of Compound 1 Form A.

Figure 4 illustrates the TGA thermogram of Compound 1 Form A.

Figure 5 illustrates the molecular structure of Compound 1 Form A, as determined from single crystal data.

Figure 6 illustrates the comparison between the simulated powder diffraction pattern and the experimentally derived powder diffraction pattern of Compound 1 Form A.

Figure 7 illustrates the crystal packing and hydrogen bond scheme for of Compound 1 Form A.

Figure 8A illustrates the full FT-IR spectrum of Compound 1 Form A, Figure 8B illustrates the expansion of the full FT-IR spectrum of Figure 8A, in the fingerprint region of 2000 to 750 cm" .

Figure 9A illustrates the Raman spectrum of Compound 1 Form A, Figure 9B and 9C illustrate expansions of the full Raman spectrum of Figure 9A, in the ranges of -3200 to -2450 and -1900 to -200 cm"1 respectively.

Figure 10 illustrates the X-Ray Powder Diffraction pattern of Compound 1 Form B.

Figure 11 illustrates the DSC thermogram of Compound 1 Form B.

Figure 12 illustrates the TGA thermogram of Compound 1 Form B.

Figure 13 illustrates the TGA/MS analysis of Compound 1 Form B.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

As mentioned above, the present invention is generally directed to novel crystalline forms of Compound 1 , processes for their preparation, pharmaceutical compositions containing them and methods of using the novel crystalline forms.

In general, most pharmaceutical compounds, i.e., those compounds which are useful as pharmaceutical agents, are initially produced in amorphous forms which can be characterized by only short range ordering. These compounds may be challenging to develop, as the amorphous form is often unstable relative to a crystalline form and may convert under certain conditions to any crystalline form, not necessarily the most stable one. In an embodiment of the invention, molecules of Compound 1 in the crystalline form have both short and long range ordering and have different physical properties as compared to the amorphous form.

Solid state physical properties of a material affect the ease with which the material is handled during processing into a pharmaceutical product, such as a tablet or capsule formulation. The physical properties affect the types of excipients, for example, to be added to a formulation for a pharmaceutical compound. Furthermore, the solid state physical property of a pharmaceutical compound is important to its dissolution in aqueous and liquid milieus, including gastric juices, thereby having therapeutic consequences. The solid state form of a pharmaceutical compound may also affect its storage requirements. From a physicochemical perspective, the crystalline form of a pharmaceutical compound is the preferred form. Organization of the molecules in an ordered fashion to form a crystal lattice provides improved chemical stability, flowability, and other powder properties including reduced moisture sorption. All of these properties are of importance to the manufacturing, formulation, storage and overall manageability of a pharmaceutical drug product.

Thus, practical physical characteristics are influenced by the particular solid form of a substance. One solid form may give rise to different thermal behavior from that of the amorphous material or other solid forms. Thermal behavior is measured in the laboratory by such techniques as capillary melting point, thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and can be used to distinguish some polymorphic solid forms from others. A particular polymorphic solid form may also give rise to distinct physical properties that may be detectable by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), solid state 3C-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and infrared or Raman spectrometry.

Compound 1 exists in an amorphous form, referred to herein as amorphous Compound 1. This invention is therefore directed to stable crystalline forms of

Compound 1 , i.e., Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B, whose properties can be influenced by controlling the conditions under which Compound 1 is obtained in solid form. The characteristics and properties of Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B are each described detail below.

Abbreviations

The following abbreviations may be used herein as needed:

DAD for diode array detector;

DSC for Differential scanning calorimetry;

FT-IR for Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy

FWHM for Full Width at Half Maximum;

HPLC for High Performance Liquid Chromatography;

m.p. for melting point;

PTFE for polytetrafluoroethylene;

rpm for revolutions per minute;

SDTA for Simultaneous differential thermal analysis;

TFA for trifluoroacetic acid;

TGA for Thermogravimetric analysis;

TGA/MS for Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with Mass Spectroscopy; and XRPD for X-ray powder diffraction.

Compound 1 Form A

In one embodiment of the invention, Compound 1 Form A is provided, characterized by the selection of one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty, twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, or twenty-seven X-ray powder diffraction peaks selected from the group consisting of 6.0, 8.9, 10.7, 11.9, 13.3, 14.9, 15.8, 17.9, 18.4, 18.9, 19.9, 20.1 , 20.3, 21.6, 23.6, 24.0, 24.5, 24.8, 25.3, 25.5, 25.8, 26.1 , 26.9, 27.0, 27.2, 27.7, 27.9 degrees 2Θ ± 0.3 degrees 2Θ, more preferably ± 0.2 degrees 2Θ, even more preferably ± 0.1 degrees 2Θ, most preferably ± 0.05 degrees 2Θ.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by the following set of XRPD peaks and, optionally, by the associated intensities listed in Table 1 :

TABLE 1. XRPD PEAK TABLE FOR COMPOUND 1 FORM A


Peak ID Embodimen t Preferred embodiment

Angle (2Θ) d-Value Intensity* Angle (2Θ) d-Value Intensity*

20 25.5 3.5 L 25.4612 3.4955 L

21 25.8 3.5 L 25.7788 3.4532 L

22 26.1 3.4 L 26.1404 3.4062 L

23 26.9 3.3 L 26.8526 3.3175 L

24 27.0 3.3 L 26.9880 3.3011 L

25 27.2 3.3 L 27.1630 3.2803 L

26 27.7 3.2 L 27.6680 3.2215 L

27 27.9 3.2 L 27.8793 3.1976 L

For normalized intensity values: L

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by an XRPD substantially according to Figure 2.

In a preferred embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by an XRPD containing at least one of the following peaks: 5.96, 8.92, 10.74, 13.33 and 15.80 degrees 2Θ ± 0.3 degrees 2Θ, more preferably ± 0.2 degrees 2Θ, even more preferably ± 0.1 degrees 2Θ, most preferably ± 0.05 degrees 2Θ. In a more preferred embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by an XRPD containing at least two of the following peaks: 5.96, 8.92, 10.74, 13.33 and 15.80 degrees 2Θ ± 0.3 degrees 2Θ, more preferably ± 0.2 degrees 2Θ, even more preferably ± 0.1 degrees 2Θ, most preferably ± 0.05 degrees 2Θ.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by a DSC thermogram substantially according to Figure 3.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by a TGA thermogram substantially according to Figure 4.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by a DSC thermogram with an endothermic event with an onset at 173.1 °C ± 0.3 °C, more preferably ± 0.2 °C, most preferably ± 0.1 °C, and a characterizing endothermic peak at 188.2 °C ± 0.3 °C, more preferably ± 0.2 °C, most preferably ± 0.1 °C, followed by a second endothermic event with an onset at 187.1 °C ± 0.3 °C, more preferably ± 0.2 °C, most preferably ± 0.1 °C, and a characterizing peak at 192.5 °C ± 0.3 °C, more preferably ± 0.2 °C, most preferably ± 0.1 °C. From the analysis of the DSC

thermogram, it was concluded that Compound 1 Form A is anhydrous.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is anhydrous and is stable as indicated by the DSC thermogram in Figure 3, which shows the acetate is closely associated with Compound 1 and only decomposes at or near the melting point.

Compound 1 Form A crystallizes in a chiral monoclinic C2 space group with one anion - cation pair in the asymmetric unit, as seen in Figure 7. The crystal is held together by a network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds and a Zig-Zag chain is formed, which likely provides the unexpected high stability/melting point of Compound 1.

In another embodiment of the invention, Compound 1 Form A is provided, characterized by the selection of one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty, twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-nine, thirty, thirty-one, thirty-two, thirty-three, thirty-four or thirty-five FT-IR transmission peaks selected from the group consisting of 655.0, 668.5, 675.2, 685.4, 774.2, 805.4, 814.4, 824.2, 880.2, 910.3, 937.4, 963.3, 1006.4, 1044.1 , 1077.9, 1101.4, 1 169.3, 1195.3, 1222.4, 1299.7, 1332.8, 1386.5, 1397.7, 1436.3, 1446.9, 1477.1 , 1494.8, 1520.2, 1557.0, 1612.9, 1653.4, 2853.6, 2931.3, 2964.8, 3335.2 ± 3 cm"1, more preferably ± 2 cm"1, and most preferably ± 1 cm"1.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by the following set of FT-IR transmission peaks listed in Table 1 :

TABLE 2. FT-IR TRANSMISSION PEAK TABLE FOR COMPOUND 1 FORM A


Peak ID FT-IR transmission (cm"1)

24 1436.3

25 1446.9

26 1477.1

27 1494.8

28 1520.2

29 1557.0

30 1612.9

31 1653.4

32 2853.6

33 2931.3

34 2964.8

35 3335.2

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by an FT-IR transmission spectrum substantially according to Figure 8.

In a preferred embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by an FT-IR transmission spectrum containing at least one of the following peaks: 910, 1006, 1 169 and 1398 cm"1 ± 3 cm"1 , more preferably ± 2 cm"1, and most preferably ± 1 cm"1. In a more preferred embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by an FT-IR transmission spectrum containing at least two of the following peaks: 910, 1006, 1 169 and 1398 cm"1 ± 3 cm"1 , more preferably ± 2 cm"1, and most preferably ± 1 cm"1.

In another embodiment of the invention, Compound 1 Form A is provided, characterized by the selection of one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, or eighteen Raman shift peaks selected from the group consisting of 2991.2, 2977.3, 2935.3, 2925.8, 2903.7, 2858.3, 1654.3, 1477.9, 1447.7, 1307.9, 1009.8, 945.8, 919.2, 881.7, 743.7, 721.8, 614.8, 423.6 ± 3 cm"1 , more preferably ± 2 cm"1 , and most preferably ± 1 cm"1.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by the following set of Raman shift peaks listed in Table 1 :

TABLE 3. RAMAN SHIFT PEAK TABLE FOR COMPOUND 1 FORM A


Peak ID Raman Shift (cm"1)

9 1447.7

10 1307.9

1 1 1009.8

12 945.8

13 919.2

14 881.7

15 743.7

16 721.8

17 614.8

18 423.6

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by a Raman shift spectrum substantially according to Figure 9.

In a preferred embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by a Raman shift spectrum containing at least one of the following peaks: 1654, 1478, 919, 744, 722, and 615 cm"1 ± 3 cm"1, more preferably ± 2 cm"1 , and most preferably ± 1 cm"1. In a more preferred embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is characterized by a Raman shift spectrum containing at least two of the following peaks: 1654, 1478, 919, 744, 722, and 615 cm"1 ± 3 cm"1, more preferably ± 2 cm"1 , and most preferably ± 1 cm"1.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A, which is anhydrous, is stable and resistant to hydrate formation, to significant amounts of exposure to water as it can be handled in the presence of water (see Example 8 below; 40% water) and exposed to high humidity (75% relative humidity) for 2 days (see General Method J below) without converting to another form, as evidenced by XRPD data (see Example 3 below).

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form A is in a substantially pure form, and preferably substantially free from other amorphous, crystalline and/or polymorphic forms. In this respect, "substantially pure" means at least about 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, or 99% of the pure compound. In this respect, "substantially free from other amorphous, crystalline and/or polymorphic forms" means that no more than about 20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 4%, 3%, 2%, 1 % of these other amorphous, crystalline and/or polymorphic forms are present.

In embodiments of the invention, a method for the preparation of Compound 1 Form A is provided, including the steps of preparing a suspension of amorphous Compound 1 in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetone, 2-butanone, ethyl acetate, 1 ,4-dioxane, te/f-butyl methyl ether, tetrahydrofuran, acetonitrile, chloroform, cyclohexane, heptane, toluene, p- xylene, cumene, isopropyl acetate, isopropyl ether, dichloromethane, 2-methoxyethanol, ethyl formate, anisole, 1 ,2-dimethoxyethane, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, A/./V-dimethylacetamide, 1-butanol, 2-ethoxyethanol, butyl acetate, methyl formate, n-pentane, A/,A/-dimethylformamide, hexane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, diethyl ether, cyclopentane, decane or a mixture thereof, and crystallizing Compound 1 Form A by methods known to those skilled in the art, such as, but not limited to, cooling crystallization, evaporative crystallization by anti-solvent addition, vapor diffusion into liquid crystallization, vapor diffusion onto a solid crystallization, and crystallization by wet milling. In a preferred embodiment, the solvent is selected from the group of water, acetonitrile, methanol, 2-butanone, ethanol, isopropanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, te/f-butyl methyl ether, heptane, isopropyl acetate, isopropyl ether, ethyl formate, anisole, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, 1-butanol, butyl acetate, methyl formate, n-pentane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, diethyl ether, decane, or a mixture thereof. In a more preferred embodiment, the solvent is selected from the group of water, acetonitrile, methanol, 2-butanone, ethanol, isopropanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, te/f-butyl methyl ether, heptane, isopropyl acetate, ethyl formate, anisole, 1-butanol, butyl acetate, n-pentane, diethyl ether, isopropyl ether, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, methyl formate, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, cyclopentane, decane or a mixture thereof.

In certain embodiments, a second solvent (co-solvent or anti-solvent) is used in an amount between 5% and 75% (v/v) with an amount of first solvent between 95% and 25% (v/v), preferably between 10% and 35% (v/v) with an amount of first solvent between 90% and 65% (v/v), more preferably between 15% and 30% (v/v) with an amount of first solvent between 85% and 70% (v/v), and most preferably between 20% and 25% (v/v), with an amount of first solvent between 80% and 75% (v/v). In a preferred embodiment, acetonitrile, heptane, toluene, p-xylene, methylcyclohexane, chloroform, anisole, isopropyl acetate, cyclohexane, or n-pentane is used as a second solvent.

The crystal of Compound 1 Form A of the invention has also been

characterized in one aspect relating to the single-crystal structure of Compound 1

Form A as depicted in Figure 5 and/or Figure 7 and/or in Table 4:

TABLE 4. CRYSTAL DATA AND STRUCTURE REFINEMENT FOR 1 FORM A.

Compound 1 Form B

In another embodiment of the invention, there is disclosed crystalline

Compound 1 Form B , characterized by the selection of one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty, twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty- five, twenty-six, twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-nine, thirty, or thirty-one X-ray powder diffraction peaks selected from the group consisting of 5.5, 9.0, 9.4, 10.5, 12.2, 12.9, 13.2, 14.0, 14.3, 15.4, 16.1 , 16.6, 17.0, 18.0, 18.3, 19.0, 20.0, 21.3, 22.8, 24.4, 25.0, 25.8, 26.8, 27.3, 28.1 , 28.9, 31.1 , 32.5, 33.6, 34.3, 36.2 degrees 2Θ ± 0.3 degrees 2Θ, more preferably ± 0.2 degrees 2Θ, even more preferably ± 0.1 degrees 2Θ, most preferably ± 0.05 degrees 2Θ.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form B can be characterized by the following set of XRPD peaks and, optionally, by the associated intensities listed in Table 5:

TABLE 5. XRPD PEAK TABLE FOR COMPOUND 1 FORM B


Peak ID Embodiment Preferred embodiment

Angle (2Θ) d-Value Intensity* Angle (2Θ) d- Value Intensity*

30 34.3 2.6 L 34.2825 2.6136 L

31 36.2 2.5 L 36.2378 2.4756 L

For normalized intensity values: L

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form B is characterized by an XRPD substantially according to Figure 10.

In a preferred embodiment, Compound 1 Form B is characterized by an XRPD pattern containing at least one of the following peaks: 5.5056, 9.3738 and 12.2283 degrees 2Θ ± 0.3 degrees 2Θ, more preferably ± 0.2 degrees 2Θ, even more preferably ± 0.1 degrees 2Θ, most preferably ± 0.05 degrees 2Θ. In a more preferred embodiment, Compound 1 Form B is characterized by an XRPD containing at least two of the following peaks: 5.5056, 9.3738 and 12.2283 degrees 2Θ ± 0.3 degrees 2Θ, more preferably ± 0.2 degrees 2Θ, even more preferably ± 0.1 degrees 2Θ, most preferably ± 0.05 degrees 2Θ.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form B is characterized by a DSC substantially according to Figure 1 1.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form B is characterized by a TGA substantially according to Figure 12.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form B of the present invention is characterized by DSC with an endothermic event with an onset at 170.4 °C ± 0.3 °C, more preferably ± 0.2 °C, most preferably ± 0.1 °C and a characterizing endothermic peak at 186.6 °C± 0.3 °C, more preferably ± 0.2 °C, most preferably ± 0.1 °C. From thermal analysis, it is concluded that solid Compound 1 Form B is a hydrate.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form B is a hydrate.

In another embodiment, Compound 1 Form B is in a substantially pure form, preferably substantially free from other amorphous, crystalline and/or polymorphic forms. In this respect, "substantially pure" relates to at least about 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, or 99% of the pure compound. In this respect, "substantially free from other amorphous, crystalline and/or polymorphic forms" means that no more than about 20% 15%, 10%, 5%, 4%, 3%, 2%, 1 % of these other amorphous, crystalline and/or polymorphic forms are present in the form according to the invention.

The present invention in one aspect relates to a method for the preparation of the crystalline Compound 1 Form B comprising the steps of preparing a suspension of Compound 1 in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water or

tetrahydrofuran or mixtures thereof and crystallizing Compound 1 Form B by cooling crystallization, evaporative crystallization by anti-solvent addition, vapor diffusion into liquid crystallization, vapor diffusion onto a solid crystallization, or crystallization by wet milling.

In certain embodiments, a second solvent (co-solvent or anti-solvent) is used in an amount between 5% and 95% (v/v) with an amount of first solvent between 95% and 5% (v/v), preferably between 15% and 85% (v/v) with an amount of first solvent between 85% and 15% (v/v), more preferably between 25% and 75% (v/v) with an amount of first solvent between 75% and 25% (v/v), and most preferably between 35% and 65% (v/v), with an amount of first solvent between 65% and 35% (v/v).

In a preferred embodiment, the solvent is a mixture of water and

tetrahydrofuran. In a more preferred embodiment, the solvent is a 1 :1 (v/v) mixture of water and tetrahydrofuran.

Pharmaceutical Compositions

Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B may be formulated as a pharmaceutical composition in a manner similar to the pharmaceutical compositions disclosed in U.S. Patent Nos. 7,601 ,874 and 7,999,010. Such pharmaceutical compositions comprise Compound 1 Form A or Compound 1 Form B and one or more pharmaceutically acceptable carriers, wherein the Compound 1 Form A or Compound 1 Form B is present in the composition in an amount that is effective to treat the condition of interest. Typically, the pharmaceutical compositions of the present invention include Compound 1 Form A or Compound 1 Form B in an amount ranging from 0.1 mg to 250 mg per dosage depending upon the route of administration, and more typically from 1 mg to 60 mg. Appropriate concentrations and dosages can be readily determined by one skilled in the art.

Pharmaceutically acceptable carriers are familiar to those skilled in the art. For compositions formulated as liquid solutions, acceptable carriers include saline and sterile water, and may optionally include antioxidants, buffers, bacteriostats and other common additives. The compositions can also be formulated as pills, capsules, granules, or tablets which contain - in addition to Compound 1 Form A or Compound 1 Form B - diluents, dispersing and surface-active agents, binders, lubricants, and/or delayed releases agents. One skilled in this art may further formulate Compound 1 Form A or Compound 1 Form B in an appropriate manner, and in accordance with accepted practices, such as those disclosed in Remington's Pharmaceutical Sciences,

Gennaro, Ed., Mack Publishing Co., Easton, PA (current edition, the relevant sections of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety).

Utility and Methods of Administration

Compound 1 and its novel crystalline forms, i.e., Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B, have activity as SHIP1 modulators and therefore may be used to treat any of a variety of diseases, disorders or conditions in a mammal, preferably a human, that would benefit from SHIP1 modulation. Such diseases, disorders or conditions are disclosed in PCT Published Patent Application Nos. WO 2014/143561 and WO 2014/158654.

Accordingly, an embodiment of the invention is a method modulating SHIP1 activity in a mammal comprising administering an effective amount of Compound 1 Form A or Compound 1 Form B or an effective amount of a composition comprising Compound 1 Form B or Compound 1 Form A to the mammal in need thereof.

Another embodiment is a method for treating a disease, disorder or condition associated with SHIP1 activity in a mammal comprising administering an effective amount of Compound 1 Form A or Compound 1 Form B or an effective amount of a composition comprising Compound 1 Form A or Compound 1 Form B to the mammal in need thereof.

Such methods include administering to a mammal, preferably a human, Compound 1 Form A or Compound 1 Form B in an amount sufficient to treat the disease, disorder or condition. In this context, "treat" includes prophylactic

administration. Such methods include systemic administration of Compound 1 Form A or Compound 1 Form B, preferably in the form of a pharmaceutical composition as discussed above. As used herein, systemic administration includes oral and parenteral methods of administration. For oral administration, suitable pharmaceutical compositions include powders, granules, pills, tablets, and capsules as well as liquids, syrups, suspensions, and emulsions. These compositions may also include flavorants, preservatives, suspending, thickening and emulsifying agents, and other

pharmaceutically acceptable additives. For parenteral administration, the compounds of the present invention can be prepared in aqueous injection solutions which may contain buffers, antioxidants, bacteriostats, and other additives commonly employed in such solutions.

Methods of Preparation

Representative crystalline forms of Compound 1 of the invention were prepared according to Methods A to J, as described below and subsequently analyzed.

Representative crystalline forms of Compound 1 were aged by Method J and subsequently analyzed. It will be appreciated that in the following general methods, solvents used, relative amounts of solvents, and other parameters such as cooling rates, temperatures, times, etc. can be altered to suit needs, up or down by up to 50% without significant change in expected results.

Method A: Crystallization by slurry conversion and evaporative crystallization

A 26.4 mg aliquot of amorphous solid was solid dosed in a 1.8 ml_ glass vial.

Ethanol was added in defined aliquots (ex. 100 μΙ_) until about 50% of the solid had dissolved (200 μΙ_ final volume). The vial was incubated at elevated temperature for a period of time followed by cooling to ambient temperature. After prolonged incubation, the solid was separated from the liquid by centrifugation. The solid was dried under ambient conditions and analyzed by XRPD. The solvent was further evaporated under ambient conditions and the remaining solids analyzed by XRPD.

By similar techniques, a person skilled in the art would be able to obtain similar results utilizing the solvents methanol, acetone, isopropanol, ethyl acetate, 2-butanone, te/f-butyl methyl ether, 1 ,4-dioxane, acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran, cyclohexane, chloroform, toluene, heptane, cumene, p-xylene, anisole, isopropyl acetate, and 1 ,2-dimethoxyethane.

Method B: Crystallization by evaporative crystallization

A 20.4 mg aliquot of amorphous solid was dissolved in a mixture of methanol and toluene (50:50, (vv)), in a vial. The vial was heated to elevated temperature and the solution filtered through a 0.45 μηι PTFE filter, as needed, to obtain a clear solution. Subsequently, the solvents were removed by evaporation at 500 mbar vacuum until completely dry (50 hr). Solid was collected from the vials and analyzed by XRPD.

By similar techniques, a person skilled in the art would be able to obtain similar results utilizing the solvent pairs tetrahydrofuran / ethanol, water / acetonitrile, 1-butanol / isopropyl ether, isopropanol / dichloromethane, te/f-butyl methyl ether / 2-methoxyethanol, cumene / 1 ,2-dimethoxyethane, heptane / ethanol, chloroform / ethyl formate and water / 1 ,4-dioxane.

Method C: Crystallization by anti-solvent addition

A 39.7 mg aliquot of amorphous solid was dissolved in a water (100 μΙ_).

Acetonitrile (400 μΙ_), as anti-solvent, was added to the vial of the clear solution.

Precipitated solid was collected by centrifugation, dried under ambient conditions and analyzed by XRPD.

By similar techniques, a person skilled in the art would be able to obtain similar results utilizing the solvent/anti-solvent pairs ethanol/heptane,

dichloromethane/toluene, tetrahydrofuran/p-xylene, isopropanol/methylcyclohexane, methanol/chloroform, ethanol/anisole, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran/isopropyl acetate, and 1 ,4-dioxane/cyclohexane, A/./V-dimethylacetamide/n-pentane.

Method D: Crystallization by cooling

A solution of amorphous solid (121 mg/mL) was prepared in a solvent mixture of methanol and acetonitrile (400 μΙ_, 50/50 (v/v)), using 40.7 mg of amorphous solid. The slurry mixture was heated, with stirring, to elevated temperature and passed through a preheated 0.45 μηι PTFE filter to provide a clear solution. The solution was subjected to a cooling profile, for example, cooling to 5 °C with a cooling rate of 1 °C/minute. The sample was kept cold for an extended period before the precipitated solid was separated from the liquid. The solid was dried under ambient conditions and analyzed by XRPD.

By similar techniques, a person skilled in the art would be able to obtain similar results utilizing the solvent mixtures ethyl formate / 1-butanol, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran / cumene, isopropanol / chloroform, isopropyl acetate / ethanol, 1 ,4-dioxane / te/f-butyl methyl ether, p-xylene / dichloromethane, 2-methoxyethanol / 1 ,2-dimethoxyethane, and cyclohexane / ethanol.

Method E: Crystallization by thermocycling

A 27.7 mg aliquot of amorphous solid was solid dosed in a 1.8 ml_ vial and isopropanol (200 μΙ_) was added at ambient temperature. The vial was subjected to a temperature profile of heating and cooling between high (ex. 50 °C) and low (5 °C) temperatures, for three distinct cycles, for example, each heating cycle was at 10 °C/hr while the cooling cycles were at -20 °C/hr, -10 °C/hr and -5 °C/hr, for each cycle respectively, finishing at ambient temperature. Upon completion of the thermo-profile, the resulting solid was separated from the liquid by centrifugation and dried under ambient conditions before being analyzed by XRPD.

By similar techniques, a person skilled in the art would be able to obtain similar results utilizing the solvents 1 ,2-dimethoxyethane, acetonitrile, ethyl formate, 2-ethoxyethanol, tetrahydrofuran, p-xylene, isopropanol, butyl acetate, te/f-butyl methyl ether, 1 ,4-dioxane, methanol / water (60 to 80/40 to 20 (v/v)), acetonitrile / water (80 to 98/20 to 2 (v/v)), and isopropanol / water (80 to 90/20 to 10 (v/v)).

Method F: Crystallization by vapor-diffusion-onto-solid

A 1.8 mL vial was charged with 20.0 mg of amorphous solid. The vial was left open and placed in a larger container with a small amount (2 mL) of 1 ,4-dioaxne as the anti-solvent. After an extended period of exposure to the solvent vapors at room temperature, the resulting solid was collected and analyzed by XRPD.

By similar techniques, a person skilled in the art would be able to obtain similar results utilizing the anti-solvents 1 ,2-dimethoxyethane, methyl formate, isopropyl ether, n-pentane, dichloromethane, isopropanol, acetonitrile, chloroform and toluene.

Method G: Crystallization by vapor-diffusion-into-solution

A saturated solution was generated by dissolving 46.1 mg aliquot of amorphous solid, in a vial, in water (100 μί). The vial was left open and was placed in a larger closed container with a small amount (2 mL) of acetonitrile, as the anti-solvent. After an extended period of incubation, the resulting precipitated solid was separated from the liquid by centrifugation, dried under ambient conditions and analyzed by XRPD.

By similar techniques, a person skilled in the art would be able to obtain similar results utilizing the solvent / anti-solvent pairs methanol/heptane,

tetrahydrofuran/hexane, ethanol/chloroform, isopropanol, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, dichloromethane/diethyl ether, 1 ,4-dioxane/terf-butyl methyl ether, N,N-dimethylformamide/toluene, tetrahydrofuran/cyclopentane, and dichloromethane/n-pentane.

Method H: Crystallization by single-solvent drop grinding

A stainless steel RETSCH® grinding container was charged with a 19.2 mg aliquot of amorphous solid and ethyl acetate (10 μί) was added. The vial was mounted in a RETSCH® MM301 ball mill and ground at a defined frequency (ex. 30

Hz). After grinding for a defined time (ex. one hour), the resulting solid was collected and analyzed by XRPD.

By similar techniques, a person skilled in the art would be able to obtain similar results utilizing the solvent isopropanol, chloroform, decane, cumene, anisole, acetonitrile, cyclohexane, p-xylene, and 1 ,2-dimethoxyethane

Method I: Quantitative solubility assessment and crystallization

The solubility of 1 in a solvent or solvent mixture was determined at room temperature. A 20 mg aliquot of 1 (amorphous) was weighed in a standard 1.8 ml_ HPLC vial. Subsequently, isopropanol (200 μΙ_) was added and the vial was left to equilibrate at room temperature with continuous stirring. After 24 hours, the solid was separated from the liquid by centrifugation and analyzed by XRPD. Subsequently the remaining liquid phase was further filtered through a 0.45 μηι PTFE filter to remove any particulate matter. The concentration of the 1 in solution was determined by HPLC-DAD analysis using a calibration curve made from two independent stock solutions of the 1 prepared in 0.1 % TFA in water/acetonitrile (50:50).

By similar techniques, a person skilled in the art would be able to obtain similar results utilizing a variety of solvents.

Method J: Accelerated Aging Analysis by XRPD

Samples collected from the crystallization conditions were subjected, as is, to accelerated aging conditions of 40 °C and 75% relative humidity for 48 hours, via standard methods and analyzed by XRPD.

The following Examples are provided for purposes of illustration, not limitation. In summary, the following Examples disclose the preparation, analysis and

characterization of Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B of the invention. One of ordinary skill in the art understands that experimental differences may arise due to differences in instrumentation, sample preparation, or other factors.

EXAMPLE 1

Preparation of Compound 1 Form A for XRPD, DSC and TGA Analysis

Compound 1 Form A was generated through a modified Method B procedure. Amorphous Compound 1 (100 mg) was suspended in a 5: 1 (v/v) mixture of methanol (250 μΙ_) and of isopropyl acetate (50 μΙ_). The mixture was heated up to 75 °C and kept at this temperature for about 30 minutes until all remaining material was

dissolved. Heating was subsequently removed and the mixture left to slowly cool to room temperature. After several hours, white material started to precipitate. After 24 hours, white solid was filtered, washed using cold isopropyl acetate and air-dried for about 24 hours. Dry solid was manually ground, by mortar and pestle, yielding a fine white powder, i.e., Compound 1 Form A, in the mortar, which was analyzed by XRPD, DSC and TGA.

EXAMPLE 2

Preparation of Compound 1 Form B for XRPD, DSC, and TGA Analysis

Compound 1 Form B was generated through a modified Method B procedure. Amorphous Compound 1 (20.4 mg) was suspended in water (104 μΙ_) containing trifluoroethanol (0.01 % (v/v)). The mixture was kept at 21 °C and stirred using a stirring bar for 1 15 hours. The solvent was slowly evaporated under ambient conditions and remaining solid was left for drying. The dry material was manually ground, by mortar and pestle, yielding a fine white powder in the mortar, i.e.,

Compound 1 Form B, which was analyzed by XRPD, DSC and TGA.

EXAMPLE 3

X-Ray Diffraction Spectrometry Experimental Conditions

Dry solid samples from Examples 1 and 2, were transferred into a boron-glass capillary with 0.3 mm outer diameter. The capillary was mounted on the goniometer head and placed in the D8 Advance Bruker-AXS Diffractometer equipped with solid state LynxEye detector. The capillary was spinning during data recording, at 15 rpm.

The XRPD platform was calibrated using Silver Behenate for the long d-spacings and

Corundum for the short d spacings.

Data collection for Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B, were carried out, in transmission mode, at ambient conditions (-23 °C and -100 kPa) using monochromatic CuK«i radiation (1.54056 A) in the 2Θ region between 4° and 45°, with an exposure time of 90 s for each frame and 0.016° increments. No additional corrections were made during data collection.

Peak selection was performed using DIFFRACp,us EVA software package (Bruker-AXS, 2007), using a second derivative method working on data prepared by

Savitzky-Golay (Savitzky, A. & Golay, M.J.E. (1964) Anal. Chem. 36, 1627) smoothing filter with the following criteria:

1. Peak width: The algorithm uses 5 to 57 data points centered on the point of interest, and a peak is selected from the second derivate if the peak width lays within the range FWHM < Peak width < 4 x FWHM. Peak widths for 1 Form A and 1 Form B were 0.2 and 0.3°, respectively.

2. Threshold: Based on the comparison of the computed maximum of the peak with the middle of the chord joining 2 inflection points of both sides of maximum. According to Equation 1 , a peak was accepted if lP was greater than the intensity at chord center (lM) plus a factor comprising a threshold value of 1.0 multiplied by the square root of lM, as described in the software manual (DIFFRACPLUS £W» Manual (2007) Bruker-AXS, Karlsruhe):

IP > IM + T x Jl^ (Equation 1)

Where: lP = peak intensity; lM = intensity at chord center; T = threshold.

The XRPD diffractogram from Example 3 are shown in Figure 2 for Compound 1 Form A and Figure 10 for Compound 1 Form B, and are indicative of diffractograms generated from material for Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B performed by alternative crystallization methods.

In addition, crystalline material of Compound 1 Form A was subjected to Method J and analyzed by XRPD and found to yield diffractograms that were equivalent to Figure 2.

The diffractogram presented in Figure 1 was recorded on D8 Discover Bruker-AXS diffractometer using Cu Ka radiation (1.54178 A) equipped with 2D GADDS detector in transmission mode. The sample of amorphous Compound 1 was placed in the flat transmission sandwich-like 4.5 mm diameter sample holder protected by X-Ray transparent mylar foil. During the measurement sample was oscillated in x,y direction (perpendicular to the primary beam) with 1.75 mm radius. Data collection was carried out in two frames 1.5 < 2Θ < 21.5° and 19.5 < 2Θ < 41.5° and separately integrated with step size 0.04°. The final powder pattern was obtained by merging both frames using area between 19.5 < 2Θ < 21.5° as common share. Peaks were analyzed as described above.

EXAMPLE 4

Single-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction Experimental Conditions

A 1-dram vial was charged with Compound 1 (30 mg) and diluted with methanol (0.3 ml_). To the resulting solution was added methyl terf-butyl ether (0.4 ml_) and the vial sealed and allowed to stand at room temperature for 2 weeks. These conditions afforded colorless crystals approximately 0.5 cm in length as overlapping, layered plates, approximately 1 mm in thickness. The remaining solvent was removed by decanting and the crystals were allowed to dry at room temperature overnight

Suitable single crystal was selected and mounted on a Mitegen Micromount with a UV curable adhesive, which was then mounted on an X-ray diffraction goniometer (Bruker SMART X2S crystallographic system, Delft, The Netherlands). X-ray diffraction data were collected for these crystals at -73 °C, using

monochromatized (Doubly Curved Silicon Crystal) MoKa radiation (0.71073 A), from a sealed MicroFocus tube. Generator settings were 50 kV, 1 mA.

Data were acquired using three sets of Omega scans at different Phi settings and the frame width was 0.5° with an exposure time of 5.0 s. The detailed data collection strategy was as follows:


Of the 7287 reflections that were collected, 3603 were unique (Rint = 0.047); equivalent reflections (excluding Friedel pairs) were merged. Data were integrated using the Bruker SAINT software package (Version 7.68A. Bruker AXS Inc., Madison, Wisconsin, USA (1997-2010)). The linear absorption coefficient, μ, for Μο-Κα radiation is 0.80 cm"1. Data were corrected for absorption effects using the multi-scan technique (SADABS), with minimum and maximum transmission coefficients of 0.534 and 0.961 , respectively (SADABS. Bruker Nonius area detector scaling and absorption correction - V2008/1 , Bruker AXS Inc., Madison, Wsconsin, USA (2008)). The data were corrected for Lorentz and polarization effects.

The structure was solved by direct methods (SIR97 - Altomare A. , Burla M.C., Camalli M., Cascarano G.L., Giacovazzo C, Guagliardi A., Moliterni A.G.G.,

Polidori G., Spagna R. (1999) J. Appl. Cryst. 32, 1 15- 119). All non-hydrogen atoms were refined anisotropically. All O-H and N-H hydrogen atoms were located in difference maps and refined isotropically. All other hydrogen atoms were placed in calculated positions. No attempt was made to ascertain the correct absolute

configuration of the molecule, due to the weak anomalous signal from the sample. The final cycle of full-matrix least-squares refinement (function minimized was∑ w (Fo2 -Fc2)2) on F2 was based on 3603 reflections and 268 variable parameters and converged (largest parameter shift was 0.00 times its esd) with unweighted and weighted agreement factors of:

R1 =∑ | |Fo| - |Fc| | /∑ |Fo| = 0.047, l> 2o(l)

wR2 = [∑ ( w (F02 - Fc2)2 )/∑ w(F02)2]1'2 = 0.135, all data

The standard deviation of an observation of unit weight ([∑w(F02-Fc2)2/(N0-Nv)] 2, where N0 = number of observations and Nv = number of variables) was 1.07. The weighting scheme was based on counting statistics. The maximum and minimum peaks on the final difference Fourier map corresponded to 0.25 and -0.18 eVA3, respectively. Neutral atom scattering factors were taken from Cromer and Waber (Cromer, D. T. & Waber, J. T.; "International Tables for X-ray Crystallography", Vol. IV, The Kynoch Press, Birmingham, England, Table 2.2 A (1974)). Anomalous dispersion effects were included in Fcalc (Ibers, J. A. & Hamilton, W. C; Acta Crystallogr., 17, 781 (1964)); the values for Δί' and ΔΓ were those of Creagh and McAuley (Creagh, D. C. & McAuley, W.J.; "International Tables for Crystallography", Vol C, (A.J.C. Wilson, ed.), Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, Table 4.2.6.8, pages 219-222 (1992)). The values for the mass attenuation coefficients are those of Creagh and Hubbell (Creagh, D. C. & Hubbell, J.H..; "International Tables for Crystallography", Vol C, (A.J.C. Wilson, ed.), Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, Table 4.2.4.3, pages 200-206 (1992)). All refinements were performed using the SHELXL-9710 via the WinGX1 1 interface (Sheldrick, G. M. 2008. Acta Cryst. A64, 1 12-122, WnGX - V1.70 - Farrugia, L.J.; J. Appl. Cryst., 32, 837 (1999)).

Data was visualized using Mercury CSD 2.0 (Macrae, C. F., Bruno, I. J.,

Chisholm, J. A., Edgington, P. R., McCabe, P., Pidcock, E., Rodriguez-Monge, L, Taylor, R., van de Streek, J. & Wood, P. A. (2008). J. Appl. Cryst. 41 , 466). A representation of the crystal structure from this Example is shown in Figures 5 and 7. The details of this crystal structure were used in Example 5.

EXAMPLE 5

Comparison of Compound 1 Form A experimental XRPD and single-crystal-derived simulated XRPD diffractograms

The simulated powder data from the single crystal of Compound 1 Form A, described in Example 4, was performed using Mercury Package, version 3.5.1

(Macrae, C. F., Bruno, I. J., Chisholm, J. A., Edgington, P. R., McCabe, P., Pidcock, E., Rodriguez-Monge, L, Taylor, R., van de Streek, J. & Wood, P. A. (2008). J. Appl. Cryst. 41 , 466). The peak positions were calculated based on the crystal symmetry and unit cell parameters, while the peak intensities were calculated from electron density based on the atom positions within the asymmetric unit. The following restraints were applied. The radiation used was CuKai (1.54056 A). The Lorentz-polarization correction typical for a laboratory X-ray source with the fixed slit widths. Neither absorption nor background correction was included. All non-hydrogen atoms were assumed to have isotropic atomic displacement parameters (UiSo) of 0.05 A2. Hydrogen atoms for which 3D coordinates are taken into account and assigned UiSo values of 0.06 A2. The powder pattern simulator was allowed to take site occupation factors into account to correct the patterns generated for disordered structures read from CIF and SHELX Res files. All reflections have a symmetric pseudo-Voight peak shape with a full width half maximum of 0.1 degree 2Θ, corresponding to D8 Advance Resolution.

For comparison of the simulated powder pattern for the single crystal data with the experimental one, both patterns were converted in (x,y) ASCII files and overlaid. No other additional action was taken. Figure 6 depicts the comparison of Compound 1 Form A experimental XRPD and single-crystal-derived simulated XRPD diffractograms.

EXAMPLE 6

Thermal Analysis Experimental Conditions

Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B material from Examples 1 and 2, respectively, were used for thermal analysis.

DSC Analysis: Melting properties were obtained from DSC thermograms, recorded with a heat flux DSC822e instrument (Mettler-Toledo GmbH, Switzerland). The DSC822e was calibrated for temperature and enthalpy with a small piece of indium (m.p. = 156.6 °C; AHf = 28.45 J/g). Samples were sealed in standard 40 microliter aluminum pans and heated in the DSC from 25 °C to 300 °C, at a heating

rate of 10 °C/min. Dry N2 gas, at a flow rate of 50 ml/min, was used to purge the DSC equipment during measurement. Representative DSC data from Example 3 can be found in Figure 3 for Compound 1 Form A and Figure 11 for Compound 1 Form B and are indicative of DSC data generated from material for Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B performed by alternative crystallization methods.

TGA/MS Analysis: Mass loss due to solvent or water loss from the crystals, from Examples 1 and 2, were determined by TGA/SDTA analysis. Monitoring of the sample weight, during heating in a TGA/SDTA851 e instrument (Mettler-Toledo GmbH, Switzerland), resulted in a weight vs. temperature curve for each sample. The

TGA/SDTA curves for Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B are in Figures 4 and 12, respectively and are indicative of TGA/SDTA data generated from material for Compound 1 Form A and Compound 1 Form B performed by alternative crystallization methods. The TGA/SDTA851e was calibrated for temperature with indium and aluminum. Samples, from Examples 1 and 2, were weighed into 100 μΙ_ aluminum crucibles and sealed. The seals were pin-holed and the crucibles heated in the TGA from 25 °C to 300 °C at a heating rate of 10 °C/min. Dry N2 gas was used for purging. TGA/MS data for Compound 1 Form B is in Figure 13 and is indicative of TGA/MS data generated from material for Compound 1 Form B performed by alternative

crystallization methods.

EXAMPLE 7

Crystallization of Compound 1 Form A by Method D

A solution of about 100 mg/mL of Compound 1 was prepared using 39.4 mg of amorphous Compound 1 and 400 μΙ_ of an isopropyl acetate / ethanol (50/50 (v/v)) solvent mixture at ambient temperature in a 1.8 ml_ vial. The solution was heated to 60 °C, with a heating rate of 10 °C/min, and stirred at 30 rpm, using a TeflonO-coated magnetic stirring bar with dimensions 7 mm in length and 2 mm in width, and subsequently passed through a preheated 0.45 μηι PTFE filter to provide a clear solution. The solution was kept at 60 °C for one hour and then cooled to 5 °C with a rate of 1 °C/hour. The solution was constantly stirred, as above. The solution was kept at 5 °C for 48 hours and then precipitated solid was collected by centrifugation (3000 rpm for 10 minutes) followed by solvent removal by Pasteur pipette. Solids were dried under ambient conditions and analyzed by XRPD.

EXAMPLE 8

Crystallization of Compound 1 Form A by Method E

20.0 mg of amorphous Compound 1 was solid dosed in a 1.8 mL vial and 100 μΙ_ of a methanol / water mixture (60/40 (v/v)) was added at ambient temperature. The solution was subjected to a temperature profile of heating and cooling between 50 °C and 5 °C for three cycles, each heating cycle was at 10 °C/hr while the cooling cycles were at -20 °C/hr, -10 °C/hr and -5 °C/hr, for each cycle, respectively, finishing at ambient temperature. During the entire experiment the mixture was stirred at 30 rpm using a magnetic stirrer and a TEFLONO-coated magnetic stirring bar with dimensions 7mm in length and 2 mm in width.

Upon completion of the thermo-profile, the solid was collected by centrifugation (3000 rpm for 10 minutes) followed by solvent mixture removal by Pasteur pipette and dried under ambient conditions for one hour, before being analyzed by XRPD.

EXAMPLE 9

Crystallization of Compound 1 Form A by Method G

41.2 mg of amorphous Compound 1 was solid dosed into a 1.8 mL vial and dissolved in isopropanol (600 μί). The vial was left open and placed in a larger closed container with 2 mL of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, antisolvent, which was sealed and left for 14 days. The precipitated solid was collected by centrifugation (3000 rpm for 10 minutes) followed by solvent mixture removal by Pasteur pipette and dried under ambient conditions for one hour, before being analyzed by XRPD.

EXAMPLE 10

Crystallization of Compound 1 Form A by Method H

20.5 mg of amorphous Compound 1 was added to a 2.5 mL stainless steel RETSCH® grinding container. Subsequently, 10 of isopropanol was added, along with 2 stainless steel balls (2 mm diameter). The container was sealed and mounted in a RETSCH® MM301 ball mill and the material was ground at a frequency of 30 Hz at close to ambient conditions (temperature of 23 °C and pressure ~ 100,000 Pa), for one hour. The steel balls were removed and material collected and analyzed by XRPD.

EXAMPLE 1 1

Crystallization of Compound 1 Form B by Method I

Amorphous Compound 1 (19.7 mg) was suspended in 100 μΙ_ water in 1.8 mL vial. The obtained slurry was stirred at ambient conditions (temperature of 23 °C and pressure ~ 100,000 Pa) for 14 days. During the entire experiment, the solution was stirred at 30 rpm, using magnetic stirrer, and a TEFLONd^coated magnetic stirring bar with dimensions 7 mm in length and 2 mm in width. Upon completion, the mixture was centrifuged (speed: 3000 rpm, time: 10 min) and the liquid was removed using Pasteur pipette. The remaining wet solids were dried under air, at ambient conditions, for one hour before being analyzed by XRPD.

EXAMPLE 12

Crystallization of Compound 1 Form B by Method D

A solution of about 100 mg/mL of Compound 1 was prepared using 40.4 mg of amorphous Compound 1 (amorphous) and 200 of a water/tetrahydrofuran (50/50 (v/v)) solvent mixture, at ambient temperature, in a 1.8 mL vial. The solution was heated to 60 °C, with a heating rate of 10 °C/min, and stirred at 30 rpm, using a TEFLONd^coated magnetic stirring bar with dimensions 7 mm in length and 2 mm in width, and subsequently passed through a preheated 0.45 μηι PTFE filter to provide a clear solution. The solution was kept at 60 °C for one hour and then subjected to a cooling profile of cooling to 5 °C with a cooling rate of 1 °C/hour. Solution was constantly stirred, as above. Solution was kept at 5 °C for 48 hours and then precipitated solid was collected by centrifugation (3000 rpm for 10 minutes) followed by solvent removal by Pasteur pipette. Solids were dried under ambient conditions and analyzed by XRPD.

EXAMPLE 13

Preparation of Compound 1 Form A for FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy

Compound 1 Form A was generated through a modified Method C procedure, followed by a modified Method D procedure. To a solution of methanol (45.7 g; 58.1 mL; 1 :0.79 w/w) and Compound 1 (57.9 g; 0.15 mmol; 1 : 1 w/w) in a round bottom flask at 25-30 °C was added te/f-butyl methyl ether (171.2 g; 231.0 mL; 1 :2.96 w/w) drop-wise over a period of 45 minutes at 25-30 °C. The reaction mass was slowly cooled to 8 ± 2 °C and stirred at the same temperature for 45 minutes. After 45 minutes, the reaction mass was filtered and the cake washed with chilled te/f-butyl methyl ether (85.6 g; 1 15.5 ml_; 1 : 1.48 w/w). The product was dried under vacuum at 25 ± 5 °C to afford 55.0 g of the purified Compound 1 Form A material (HPLC purity of 99.8 area%) which was used for FT-IR and Raman shift spectroscopy.

EXAMPLE 14

FT-IR Spectroscopy Experimental Conditions

Compound 1 Form A material from Example 13 was used for FT-IR analysis. FT-IR analysis was performed using a Thermo Nicolet Avatar 370 FT-IR instrument and FT-IR spectra were presented using GRAMS/AI spectroscopy software version 8.00. Instrument parameters were as follows: Number of scans = 16, Number of background scans = 16, Resolution = 2.000, Sample gain = 8.0, Mirror velocity = 0.6329 and Aperture = 100.00. Air background spectra were collected before the sample analysis. Representative FT-IR spectroscopy data for Compound 1 Form A, from Example 14 can be found in Figure 8 and are indicative of FT-IR spectroscopy data generated from material for Compound 1 Form A performed by alternative crystallization methods.

EXAMPLE 15

Raman Shift Spectroscopy Experimental Conditions Compound 1 Form A material from Example 13 was used for Raman shift analysis.

Raman spectroscopy analysis was performed using a Raman station Avalon Instruments, software version 5.4.3.4 with cyclohexane used as a standard solvent for calibration and as reference spectrum for peak picking. The sample of powder was placed on a clean glass slide and placed directly below the laser pathway. Spectral data was collected using an exposure of 5 s x 5 exposures to ensure powder was homogeneous and the collected spectra represented the bulk material. Representative raman shift spectroscopy data for Compound 1 Form A, from Example 15 can be found in Figure 9 and are indicative of raman shift spectroscopy data generated from material for Compound 1 Form A performed by alternative crystallization methods.

All of the U.S. patents, U.S. patent application publications, U.S. patent applications, foreign patents, foreign patent applications and non-patent publications, including U.S. provisional patent application Serial No. 62/185,416, filed June 26, 2015, referred to in this specification are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.

Although the foregoing invention has been described in some detail to facilitate understanding, it will be apparent that certain changes and modifications may be practiced within the scope of the appended claims. Accordingly, the described embodiments are to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive, and the invention is not to be limited to the details given herein, but may be modified within the scope and equivalents of the appended claims.