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1. (WO2007010230) HAND HELD OBJECT AND HANDLING LABELS
Note: Text based on automatic Optical Character Recognition processes. Please use the PDF version for legal matters

HAND HELD OBJECTAND HANDLING LABELS

The present invention relates to hand held objects, such as garments which are hand held for dressing and to equipment and household implements and utensils which are hand held while in use. The present invention also relates to handling labels, which can be applied to hand held objects to facilitate their use.

A mentally or physically disabled or otherwise incapacitated person, for example stroke victims and the elderly, infirm and young children may experience difficulties in handling objects required for day to day living activities. This leads to the person missing out on daily life experiences, being frustrated by failing at everyday tasks or leads to them having to be helped by a carer, which can undermine their independence. For example, such people may have problems dressing. Where the present invention is applied to a garment, then it can enable a person to dress themselves where otherwise it would not be possible. Where the present invention is applied to equipment or household implements or utensils, then it can enable a person to take part in daily activities or domestic chores involving those objects where otherwise it would not be possible. Accordingly, the present invention aims to offer the opportunity for all people to live as normal a life as possible.

According to a first aspect of the present invention there is provided a hand manipulated object on which a handling instruction comprising a handle and a representation of a hand is applied at a location on the object where the object is to be handled so as to facilitate use of the object. The handle may be a graspable handle which comprises a projecting element suitable for grasping. The projecting element may define a gap suitable for receiving fingers of a hand grasping the handle. The handling instruction acts as a visual prompt to a person using the object, indicating to them where and how the object is to be held. The handle may be formed so that the holding of the handle to manipulate the object is simpler, for example for a disabled person, than holding the object itself to manipulate the object. They remind a person how to handle the object due to the location of the handling instruction on the object.

According to this aspect of the present invention there is also provided a label and/or a set of a plurality of labels suitable to be applied at associated locations on an object for facilitating use of the object, wherein each label comprises a handling instruction comprising a handle and representation of a hand which instruction is representative of a handling action at an associated object location for that label. Therefore, the same set of labels can be applied to different objects at different times, to facilitate their use. The labels can be appropriately fitted to any selected object, for example by a carer, so as to enable the person to use the object as described herein. The labels may have the same features as are described herein in relation to the handling instructions for an object according to the first aspect of present invention. In particular, each label may comprise a fixing element for releasably fixing the labels to an object. This provides flexibility to locate the handling instructions at a position on the object to take into account the characteristics or difficulties experienced by a person who is to use the object. For example, the positioning can take into account a person's left or right handedness, or a natural inclination to orient the object incorrectly.

In one example, a handling instruction for instructing the grasping of an object may comprises a graspable handle. So a graspable handle comprising an image of a hand showing a grasping action is applied to an object in locations where the object is to be grasped. For example, the graspable handle may include an image of a hand, or the handle may be formed as a three dimensional representation of a hand, such as a three dimensional representation of the hand grasping the handle in the correct way. The graspable handle may be in the form of a loop handle through which a user inserts their hand. Such a loop handle defines a gap through which a person may insert their fingers or whole hand. Any form of handle useful for grasping the object may be used. Where a person has a weak grip, then the addition of a graspable handle can enable them to handle an object whereas otherwise their grip would not be strong enough. For example, a person with a weak grip may struggle to effectively grasp a waistband of a garment to pull it up to waist level, whereas when a handle, especially a loop handle, is fixed to the waistband their grip may be sufficient to pull up the waistband. Where a loop type handle is used the person can hook their hand through the loop of such a handle, without having to strongly grip the handle, and still apply sufficient force to carry out the necessary handling action.

The handling instruction may be a semi-rigid hand shaped glove, suitable for receiving a hand. The semi-rigid structure of the glove forms a handle that can be engaged by a user's hand simply by slipping the hand within the glove. In this case the representation of the hand may be formed by the shape of the glove itself and/or by a pictorial representation on the glove.

Where a glove type handle is used the glove may be made of a semi rigid material, so as to guide a person's hand into a correct alignment for handling the object or to support the person's hand while they are handling the object. Again if a person is weak, then the support of a semi rigid glove type handle can facilitate their successful handling of an object where otherwise it would not be possible.

The object may be a garment in which case the handling instruction may take the form of an instruction of how to dress in the garment. The dressing instruction provides a visual reminder to a person of how to hold the garment in the correct orientation for dressing and/or how to dress in it. The term garment, as used herein, includes the term apparel and includes all forms of clothing and any other objects a person might wear, including footwear, such as shoes and headwear, such as hats.

Alternatively, the object may be an equipment, implement or utensil. The term equipment might include telephones and cameras, or any other equipment a person might handle, for example associated with pastimes and hobbies. The terms implement or utensils might include cups, dishes, cookware, hand or bath towels, toothpaste tubes and toothbrushes, or any other object which a person might handle on a day to day basis.

Each handling instruction may comprise a fixing element for releasably fixing the instruction to an object. Then the handling instructions can be fitted to the object before use, for example by a carer, and can optionally be removed after use. This provides flexibility to locate the handling instructions at a location on the object to take into account the characteristics or difficulties experienced by a person who is to use the object. For example, the location can take into account a person's left or right handedness, or a natural inclination to orient the object incorrectly. In this way the location at which the handling instruction is attached to the object can be personalised to meet a person's specific needs, depending on their particular set of problems.

For some objects a plurality of handling instructions may need to be applied at different locations on the object, where the mode of handling is more complicated.

The representation can be oriented with respect to the object so as to indicate the correct way of holding the handle. For example, a hand grasping instruction can include a pictorial representation of a hand in an orientation to be copied by a person so that the person holds the handle correctly. The image of the hand may be shown with the thumb or a finger sticking out as an indicator of the hand positioning required to correctly hold the handle to manipulate the object. An image of a hand with, for example the forefinger sticking out, can point a person to handle the object by moving their hand in the direction the finger is pointing.

An image of a direction indicating pictorial representation, such as an arrow, may be included in a handling instruction so as to indicate the correct way of handling the object.

According to a second aspect of the present invention there is provided a garment on which a handling instruction comprising a representation of a hand is applied at a location on the garment where the garment is to be handled so as to facilitate dressing in the garment.

According to this second aspect of the invention there is also provided a label suitable to be applied at a location on a garment for facilitating dressing in the garment, wherein the label comprises a handling instruction comprising a representation of a hand which instruction is representative of an handling action at an associated garment location for that label.

The garment or label according to this second aspect of the present invention may have the following preferred features.

Where dressing in a garment is relatively complex, a plurality of handling instructions may applied at different appropriate locations on the garment. The pictorial representation may be oriented with respect to the garment so as to indicate the correct way of handling the garment. The handling instruction may be a three dimensional structure or a two dimensional image. The handling instruction may include a direction indicating pictorial representation, indicating the correct way of handling the garment. The handling instruction may comprise a label applied on the garment. Where the handling instruction instructs placement of a hand with respect to the garment, the instruction may be located at a position on the garment where the hand is to be placed. The handling instruction may be removable from the garment.

A garment may have secondary instruction labels applied to it showing a representation of a body part other than a hand which can instruct placement of body parts, other than a hand, with respect to the garment with the instruction located at a position on the object where the body part is to be placed. This can visually prompt a person to move the body part shown on the instruction to the position of the instruction on the object. The location of the body part instruction at the desired position on the object can be sufficient to correctly orientate the object for use or can be sufficient to remind the person how to use the object correctly.

For garment a, a label may instruct placement of a body part with respect to the object, for example within a garment, in which case the label may be located at a position on the object where the body part is to be placed. Taking again the example of a garment, where a person is dressing themselves in a garment, they may be confused as to where to position and move their body parts, such as arms and legs, in order to get dressed. In this case the label can be placed in the best location on a garment for placing a body part so as to dress in it. The person can then observe the label and place their body part in the vicinity of the instruction. This can be sufficient to remind the person of the physical action required to dress in the garment.

Colour coding may be applied to a label as an indication of the type of handling action required. For example, labels relating to a right hand side body part can be differently coloured to instructions relating to a left hand side body part. Also, labels relating to grasping of a garment may be differently coloured to instructions relating to the placement of body parts with respect to a garment during its use.

An image of a direction indicating pictorial representation, such as an arrow, may be included in a handling instruction or secondary instruction label so as to indicate the correct way of handling the object. For example, this may be particularly relevant where an instruction instructs placement of a body part within a garment. A person can observe the instruction, place their body part in the vicinity of the instruction and then follow the direction of the arrow as a further visual prompt to enable the person to follow the action required to dress in the garment.

A handling instruction may instruct grasping of the object, in which case the instruction may be located at a position where the object is to be grasped. For example, a person dressing him/herself in a garment, may be confused as to where to hold the garment in order to get dressed in it. In this case the handling instructions can be positioned in the best position for holding the garment while dressing in it. The person can then observe a handling instruction and grasp a garment in the position of the instruction. This can correctly orientate the garment for dressing and may be sufficient instruction to enable a person to dress themselves in the garment.

The invention will now be described by way of example only and with reference to the accompanying schematic drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 shows a perspective view of a pair of trousers utilising handle type handling instructions according to the first aspect of the present invention;

Figure 2 shows a plan view of the trousers of Figure 1 with the waistband open and using different designs handling instructions to that of Figure 1 ;
Figure 3 shows a person dressing in the pair of trousers of Figure 2;
Figure 4 shows a front view of a jacket, cardigan or coat with the front open utilising handling instructions according to the second aspect of the present invention;
Figure 5a shows the handling instruction of Figure 1 folded outside the trousers of Figure 1 as a fashion accessory;
Figure 5b shows the handling instruction of Figure 2 folded inside the trousers of Figure 2;
Figure 6 shows a front view of a camera utilising a glove type handling instruction according to the first aspect of the present invention;
Figure 7 shows a set of labels according to the second aspect of the present invention;

Figure 8 shows a set of handle type labels according to the first aspect of the present invention;
Figure 9 shows a cup to which a handle type label according to the first aspect of the present invention is applied;
Figures 10a and 10b show garments to which labels according to the second aspect of the invention are attached;
Figure 11 shows a pair of shoes with a pair of handle type labels according to the first aspect of the present invention applied to one of the pair; and
Figure 12 shows an alternative style of handle to that shown in Figure 10 suitable for use in relation to a pair of shoes.

The invention may be applied to many different types of garment, such as skirts, shorts, dresses, underwear, coats, jackets, hats, shoes and tops, including T-shirts, shirts, jumpers and cardigans. For example, garments on which the present invention is applied may be made of stretchable material and may have simple fastenings so as to make dressing simpler.

Figure 1 shows a view of a garment, in this example a pair of trousers (2), according to the present invention. In particular, the trousers (2) are made of a stretchable material and have an elasticated waistband (4) instead of complicated fastenings, so as make dressing in the trousers a simple process.

Two handling instructions, referred to here as dressing instructions (6, 8) are applied to the trousers (2). The dressing instructions (6, 8) are formed as handle type labels (15). They comprise a loop type handle (60) with an extension (62) applied to the waistband (4) of the trousers (2). A hand sized hand shape (64), for example made of embroidered fabric, is secured to the loop handle (60) in the orientation with which a person has to grip the loop handle in order to dress correctly in the trousers. To make the hand orientation clearer, a hand shape (64) is used which has the thumb sticking out. The loop handle can be made of fabric or plastic or any other suitable material rigid enough to take the strain required to pull on the trousers (2). The hand shape (64) can be made of a flap of embroidered fabric, sufficiently rigid to indicate the orientation with which a person's hand is to be positioned in the loop handle (60), but flexible enough for the hand shape (64) to be comfortably held within the hand of a person holding the loop handle (60). Alternatively, the hand shape (64) can be three dimensional, for example made out of embroidered fabric filled with a suitable padding material. Again the padded or stuffed hand shape would need to be rigid enough to indicate the orientation with which a person's hand is to be positioned in the loop handle (60), but flexible enough, and suitably compressible for the hand shape (64) to be comfortably held within the hand of a person holding the loop handle (60). The handle type dressing instructions (6, 8) can be designed to be aesthetically pleasing, so that after use during dressing, the dressing instruction (6, 8) can be folded out over the waistband (4) of the trousers, as shown in Figure 5a, as a design feature of the trousers (2). Some easily operable releasable fastening, such as Velcro, can be used to hold the dressing instruction (6, 8) folded out of the waistband (4). It can be seen that a person grasping the handle type dressing instructions (6, 8) by copying the positioning of the hand shapes (64) has the trousers correctly orientated. This may be sufficient for a person to dress themselves in the trousers (2) whereas otherwise they would have been unable to do so.

Referring now to Figure 2, a pair of trousers (2) is shown, similar to those of Figure 1 , to which two dressing instructions (6a, 8a) and two secondary instruction labels (10, 12) are applied. The dressing instructions (6a, 8a) are formed as handle type labels (15a). They again comprise a loop type handle (60) with an extension (62) applied to the waistband (4) of the trousers (2). A two dimensional image of a hand shape (18) is displayed on the extensions (62) in the orientation with which a person has to grip the loop handle in order to dress correctly in the trousers. To make the hand orientation clearer, a hand shape (18) is used which has the thumb sticking out. Again, the loop handle can be made of fabric or plastic or any other suitable material rigid enough to take the strain required to pull on the trousers (2). The hand shapes (18) can, for example, be embroidered on or printed on the extensions (62). The dressing instruction (6a, 8a) can be formed as flaps, which can be tucked away, under the waistband (4) of the trousers, after a person is dressed in the garment as is shown in figure 5b. Two secondary instruction labels (10, 12) are applied to the trousers (2). They may be made of any suitable material, for example fabric, on which are shown images of a body part. The images may, for example, be printed or embroidered on the labels (10,12). The labels (10, 12) may be permanently fixed to the trousers (2), for example by sewing them to the trousers. Alternatively, the labels (10,12) may be releasably fixed to the trousers, for example by a zip, Velcro, or a releasable clip type fastener (42, 142).

The dressing instructions (6a, 8a) relate to hand positioning locations on the waistband (4) of the trousers. When a person dresses in the trousers (2), as shown in Figure 3, they have to grasp the handle type dressing instructions (6a, 8a) at the positions designated by the location of the dressing instructions (6a, 8a). Therefore, the dressing instructions (6a, 8a) show images of hands (18) and are located at opposite sides of the trouser waistband (4) in convenient positions for grasping the trousers (2) in order to get dressed in them. If a person is able to hold the trousers (2) in the correct orientation by holding on to the handle type dressing instructions (6a, 8a), this may be sufficient to enable them to dress themselves in the trousers.

The two secondary instruction labels (10, 12) relate to feet positioning locations at the entry to the leg holes (15, 16) of the trousers. When a person dresses in the trousers (2), as shown in Figure 3, they have to position their feet through the leg holes (15, 16) designated by the location of the labels (10, 12). Therefore, the labels (10, 12) show an image of a foot or leg (17) at the leg hole locations on the trousers and also show an image of an arrow (19) designating the direction in which a leg should be moved into the leg holes.

As shown in Figure 3, to get dressed in the trousers (2), a person would grasp the handle type dressing instructions (6a, 8a), with their hands copying the orientation of the hand images (18) on the dressing instructions. This ensures that the correct hand grasps the correct handle type dressing instruction (6a, 8a) so that the trousers will not be put on back to front. With the trousers (2) held in this way, the person would then place one of their feet at the entrance to one of the leg holes (15, 16) as indicated by the foot positioning dressing instruction (10, 12). Then following the arrow (19) on the foot positioning labels (10, 12), they would push their foot to the end of the trouser leg. The person would then place the other of their feet at the entrance to the other one of the leg holes (15, 16) as indicated by the other one of the foot positioning labels (10, 12). Then following the arrow (19) on the foot positioning labels (10, 12), the person would push their foot to the end of the trouser leg. The waistband (4) of the trousers (2) could then be pulled up to waist level by the person still grasping handle type dressing instructions (6a, 8a). The handle type dressing instructions (6a, 8a) would then be tucked away under the waistband (4) of the trousers as shown in Figure 5b, either by the person or their carer.

Figure 4, shows an alternative embodiment of the present invention, in which the garment is a cardigan, jacket or coat (22). Four dressing instructions (26, 28, 30, 32) are applied to the garment (22). Two of the dressing instructions (26, 28) relate to hand positioning locations on the lapels (24) of the garment. When a person dresses in the garment (22), they grasp the hand positions designated by the location of the dressing instructions (26, 28). Therefore, the dressing instructions (6, 8) show images of hands (18) and are located on the lapels (24) in convenient positions for grasping the garment (22) in order to dress in the garment. When grasping the lapels (24) at the dressing instructions (26, 28) a person orients their hand as is shown on the image (18) the dressing instruction, so that they grasp the garment (22) in the correct way for dressing.

The other two of the dressing instructions (30, 32) relate to arm positioning locations at the entry to the arm holes (34, 36) of the garment (22). When a person dresses in the garment (22), they have to position their hands at the arm holes (34, 36) designated by the location of the dressing instructions (30, 32). Therefore, the dressing instructions (30, 32) show an image of a hand or arm (18) at the arm hole locations on the garment and the images (18) show the hands pointing into the arm hole, thus designating the direction in which an arm should be moved into the arm holes.

To get dressed in the garment (22), a person would grasp the garment with one hand at each of the points on the lapel (24) at which the hand grasping dressing instructions (26, 28) are located. When grasping the lapel the person would copy the hand orientation shown on the images (18) on the instructions (26, 28). This correctly orients the garment (22) for dressing in. With the garment (22) held in this way, the person would then release one of the hands from the lapels (24) and place it at the entrance to one of the arm holes (34, 36) as indicated by the hand positioning dressing instruction (30, 32). Then following the arrow (19) on the hand positioning dressing instruction (30, 32) would push their hand to the end of the garment arm. The person would then place the other of their hands at the entrance to the other one of the arm holes (34, 36) and would push their arm to the end of the garment arm, either on their own, or with help from their carer.

As an alternative to, or in addition to the use of arrows, colour coding can be used to distinguish grasping dressing instructions, such as hand grasping dressing instructions (6, 8, 6a, 8a, 26, 28) from positioning dressing instructions, such as the leg positioning instructions (10, 12) and hand positioning instructions (30, 32). For example, hand grasping dressing instructions (26, 28) might be coloured red and hand positioning instructions (30, 32) might be coloured blue.

Also, a coding system could be used to distinguish dressing instructions intended for the right and left limbs. For example, in the embodiment of Figures 1 and 2, the label (14) intended for the left leg, could be colour coded green and the label (12) intended for the right leg could be colour coded yellow. Sometimes, it will be necessary to use two dressing instructions of the same handedness, for example left handedness, on an object. This might be the case where a person has use of only one arm, in this example the left arm.

An alternative embodiment of the present invention is shown in Figure 6, in relation to an object which is a piece of equipment, in this example a camera (80). The camera is operated to take a photograph by depressing a button (88). In this case a handle type handling instruction (82), in the form of a semi-rigid glove is applied at a location on the camera, representative of where the camera is to be held and where the camera is to be operated. The glove (82) is a three dimensional representation of a hand. The glove (82) is fixed to the camera (80) with the finger holes (84) of the glove wrapped around the camera in a suitable position for securely holding the camera and the thumb hole of the glove positioned above the button (88). Usually a person would use their index finger to press a button on a camera to take a picture. In the Figure 6 embodiment, a person's thumb is used to depress the button (88), which may be necessary where a person has insufficient independent finger movement to press the button. To use the camera, a person places their hand within the glove and the semi-rigid structure of the glove guides their hand into the glove, with their fingers extending along the finger holes (84) of the glove, securely holding the camera (80) and with their thumb extending along the thumb hole (86) of the glove, poised above the button (88). The semi-rigid structure of the glove (82) can enable a person with a weak grip to securely hold the camera (80) whereas otherwise they would not be able to do so. The person then holds the camera (80) in the desired position for taking a photograph and then presses their thumb to depress the button (88). This can enable a person to take photographs, where otherwise they would not be able to do so. Alternatively, the handle type handling instruction (82) could be in the form of a glove configured so that a person used their index finger to depress the button (88). A mechanical linkage can be incorporated into the glove so as to convert a movement of a person's hand into a movement of the linkage which depresses the camera button (88). The nature of the linkage can be tailored to a person's specific requirements.

In an alternative embodiment of the present invention, shown in Figure 7, a set of labels (40) can be provided, which labels can be fixed, either permanently or releaseably to a garment to help a person to get dressed in the garment. The labels in Figure 7, include a fastening element (42) for fastening the labels to an object. For example, the fastening element could be a clip (42) of some description, such as a bull dog or peg type clip, for releasably fastening the labels to the garment. For example, the fastening element (42) can be any type of releasable fastening suitable for use on clothing. Alternatively, the labels (42) of Figure 7 can be formed as paper or fabric stickers that can be applied to appropriate locations on a garment.

The set of labels (40) can be used in the example of Figure 2. The labels (10, 12) of the set of labels (40) are releasably fixed adjacent to the leg holes (15, 16) of the trousers (2) with the arrows (19) pointing in the direction of movement of the legs of a person down the legs of the trousers. The labels can be fitted to the trousers (2) by a carer of a person to be dressed in the trousers (2).

The set of labels (40) can also be used in the example of Figure 4. The labels (26, 28) of the set of labels (40) are releasably fixed to the lapels (24) of the garment (22). Then the labels (30, 32) of the set of labels (40) are releasably fixed adjacent to the arm holes of the garment (22), with the forefingers of the hand images (18) pointing in the direction of movement of the arms of a person along the arms of the garment (22). The labels can be fitted to the garment (22) by a carer of the person to be dressed in the garment (22).

Then after the person has dressed themselves, in the garment (22), as described above in relation to Figure 4, the labels (26, 28, 30, 32) can be removed from the garment, for example by the carer.

The embodiment of the present invention, shown in Figure 8, comprises a set of handle type labels (140), which labels can be fixed, either permanently or releaseably to an object to help a person to handle the object. The labels in Figure 7, each include a fastening element (142) for fastening the labels to an object. For example, the fastening element could be a clip (42) of some description, such as a bull dog or peg type clip, for releasably fastening the labels to the garment. Where the object is a garment, the fastening element (142) can be any type of releasable fastening suitable for use on clothing.

The set of labels (140) can be applied to the embodiment of Figure 1. Referring now to Figures 1 and 8, the labels comprising handle type dressing instructions (6, 8) of the set of labels (140) are releasably fixed to waistband (4) of the trousers (2) as shown in Figure 1. The handle type dressing instructions (6, 8) are identical in structure to those described in relation to Figure 1 except that they are not permanently fixed on the trousers (2). The handle type dressing instructions (6, 8) are fixed to the trousers (2) with the thumbs pointing forward of the front part of the trousers. A person can then dress themselves in the trousers (2) as is described above. The labels can be fitted to the trousers (2) by a carer of the person to be dressed in the trousers (2). Then after the person has dressed themselves, in the trousers (2), the labels (6, 8) can be removed from the garment, for example by the carer.

Referring now to Figures 2, 3 and 8, the labels comprising handle type dressing instructions (6a, 8a) of the set of labels (140) can be used in the embodiment of Figures 2 and 3. The dressing instructions (6a, 8a) are releasably fixed to waistband (4) of the trousers (2) as shown in Figure 2. The dressing instructions (6a, 8a) are identical in structure to those describe above in relation to Figures 2 and 3, except that they are not permanently fitted to the trousers (2). The handle type dressing instructions (6a, 8a) are fixed to the trousers (2) with the thumbs on the hand images (18) pointing forward of the front part of the trousers. A person can then dress themselves in the trousers (2) as is described above in relation to Figures 2 and 3. The labels can be fitted to the trousers (2) by a carer of the person to be dressed in the trousers (2). Then after the person has dressed themselves, in the trousers (2), the labels (6a, 8a) can be removed from the garment, for example by the carer.

The present invention can also be applied to many different types of everyday objects, such as a variety of household objects. Figure 9 shows the application of the present invention to a cup (90). A handling instruction (92, 94) formed as a handle to which is fitted a shape of a hand is fitted to the cup (90) in the location and orientation which a person copies in order to correctly hold the cup (90). To more clearly show a person the correct hand orientation, the thumb of the hand is pointing upward. For example, the representation of the hand (94) could be made from fabric or from a foam material, which is rigid enough to clearly show a person the correct orientation of hand positioning and the correct location for grasping the handle (92) and yet flexible enough to be comfortably held with the hand of the person while they are grasping the handle (92). This embodiment of the present invention can be applied to any object requiring a handle that must be grasped during use of the object.

Figures 10a and 10b show a garments, shown as a pair of socks (120) and a pair of pants, trunks or bikini bottoms (130) to which dressing instruction, in the form of hand images (124, 134) are applied. For example in relation to Figure 10a, the garment (130) may be formed with the images of the hands (134) permanently applied adjacent the waistband (136) of the garment. Each hand image (134) forms a dressing instruction which is oriented in the position a person would be required to hold the garment (130) to ensure that garment is correctly oriented for dressing. The hand images (134) have the thumb stuck out towards each other in a direction towards the front of the garment. To dress in the garment, a person would hold the waistband (136) of the garment, with their hands located over and oriented in the same direction as the hand images (134), ie. with both thumbs pointing forward towards each other. The garment is then correctly oriented to be dressed in. Alternatively, the hand images (134, 124) may be formed as stickers which can be releasably fitted to the garment.

Figure 11 shows a pair of shoes with a left shoe (150) and right shoe (152). An image (156) of a left foot is applied to the interior of the sole of the left shoe in a position in which it is visible when the shoe is not worn. The image may be applied in a colour representative of the left hand side. An image (158) of a right foot is applied to the interior of the sole of the right shoe in a position in which it is visible when the shoe is not worn. Again, the image may be applied in a colour representative of the right hand side. A pair of the handle type labels (6, 8) of the type described above in relation to Figure 8 are shown attached to the left hand shoe (150). Thus, a person may grasp the handles, in a manner indicated by the shape of the hand images on the labels (6, 8) in order to pull the left shoe (150) onto their left foot. The person is guided as to which foot the shoe is to be worn on by the image of the foot (156) shown inside the left shoe, which image can be matched to the shape of the left foot about to be placed into the shoe. The image of the foot (156) and the handle type labels (6, 8) can be sufficient to provide a person with a visual prompt reminding them how to dress in the shoe (150). Once the left shoe is on the foot, the labels (6, 8) can be removed by a carer and fitted appropriately onto the right shoe (152) so that the person can then put on the right shoe in a similar manner.

Figure 12 shows a view of a left shoe from two perspectives, a plan view and a side view. This Figure shows an alternative configuration of handle type labels of the type shown in Figure 8, in which the two labels (6, 8) are connected by a strap (160). The strap (160) passes under the sole of the shoe (150) so as to rest in the depression adjacent the heel of the shoe. The strap and label arrangement (160, 6, 8) can be positioned and then a person may grasp the handles, in a manner indicated by the shape of the hand images on the labels (6, 8) in order to pull the left shoe (150) onto their left foot. The person is guided as to which foot the shoe is to be worn on by the image of the foot (156) shown inside the left shoe, which image can be matched to the shape of the left foot about to be placed into the shoe. The image of the foot (156) and the handle type labels (6, 8) can be sufficient to provide a person with a visual prompt reminding them how to dress in the show (150). Once the left shoe is on the foot, the strap and label arrangement (160, 6, 8) can be removed and fitted appropriately onto a right shoe (152) so that the person can then put on the right shoe in a similar manner.