Search International and National Patent Collections
Some content of this application is unavailable at the moment.
If this situation persists, please contact us atFeedback&Contact
1. (WO1998050532) A PROCESS FOR PREPARING AN ANTI-OXIDANT
Note: Text based on automatic Optical Character Recognition processes. Please use the PDF version for legal matters

N PROCESS OF PREPARING AN ANTI-OXIDANT

The present invention relates to a process of preparing an anti-oxidant.

An anti-oxidant prevents, inhibits or reduces the oxidation rate of an oxidisable medium. In particular, anti-oxidants are used for the preservation of food, especially when the food is or comprises a fat. Typical chemical anti-oxidants include aromatic amines, substituted phenols and sulphur compounds. Examples of anti-oxidants for food products are polyvinylpolypyrrolidone, dithiothreitol, sulphur dioxide, synthetic γ-tocopherol, δ-tocopherol, L-ascorbic acid, sodium L-ascorbate, calcium L-ascorbate, ascorbyl palmitate, propyl gallate, octyl gallate, dodecyl gallate, lecithin, diphenylamine ethoxyquin and butylated hydroxy toluene. Two commonly used antioxidants are GRINDOX 142 (obtained from Danisco A/S) and GRINDOX 1029 (obtained from Danisco A/S).

Typically, anti-oxidants are added to foodstuffs, such as beverages.

For example, anti-oxidants are used in the preparation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, cider, ale etc.. In particular, there is a wide spread use of anti-oxidants in the preparation of wine. In this regard, Butzke and Bisson in Agro-Food-Industry HiTech (July/ August 1996 pages 26-30) present a review of wine manufacture.

According to Butzke and Bisson (ibid):
s
"Wine is the product of the natural fermentation of grape must or juice.
In the case of red wine, the skins are present during the initial
fermentation to allow extraction of pigment and important flavour and
aroma constituents from the skin. The term "must" refers to the
crushed whole grapes. In the case of white wine production, skins are
removed prior to fermentation and only the juice is retained and
processed Grapes are harvested and brought directly to the winery from the field.
The grapes are then crushed at the winery and the must either
transferred to a tank for fermentation (red wine) or pressed to separate
juice from the skin and seeds (white wine). In this latter case, -the
juice is then transferred to a tank for fermentation. The tanks may
either be inoculated with a commercial wine strain of Saccharomyces
or allowed to undergo a natural or uninoculated fermentation. In a
natural fermentation, Saccharomyces cells are greatly outnumbered by
wild (non-Saccharomyces) yeast and bacteria at the beginning of
fermentation. By the end of the fermentation Saccharomyces is the
dominant and most often only organism isolateable. Inoculation with
a commercial wine strain or with fermenting juice or must changes the
initial ratio of the numbers of different microorganisms, allowing
Saccharomyces to dominate the fermentation much earlier.

The metabolic activity of microorganisms in wine results in the
production of aroma and flavour compounds some of which are highly
objectionable to the consumer and all of which are distinct from the
compounds responsible for the varietal character of the wine
Sulphur dioxide addition prevents chemical oxidation reactions and in
this sense is an important stabilizer of the natural grape aroma and
flavour. It may be added to the must or juice to preserve flavour, not
necessarily as an antimicrobial agent. However, its antimicrobial
activity must be considered when choosing a strain to be genetically
modified for wine production. "

Hence, potentially harmful chemicals - such as sulphur dioxide - are used in wine manufacture.

The present invention seeks to overcome any problems associated with the prior art methods of preparing foodstuffs with antioxidants.

According to a.first aspect of the present invention there is provided a process of preparing a medium that comprises an anti-oxidant and at least one other component, the process comprising preparing in situ in the medium the anti-oxidant; and wherein the anti-oxidant is prepared from a glucan by use of recombinant DNA techniques.

According to a second aspect of the present invention there is provided a process of preparing a medium that comprises an anti-oxidant and at least one other component, the process comprising preparing in situ in the medium the anti-oxidant; and wherein the anti-oxidant is prepared by use of a recombinant glucan lyase.

According to a third aspect of the present invention there is provided a medium prepared by the process according to the present invention.

Other aspects of the present invention include:

Use of anhydrofructose as an anti-oxidant for a medium comprising at least one other component, wherein the anhydrofructose is prepared in situ in the medium.

Use of anhydrofructose as a means for imparting or improving stress tolerance in a plant, wherein the anhydrofructose is prepared in situ in the plant.

Use of anhydrofructose as a means for imparting or improving the transformation of a grape, wherein the anhydrofructose is prepared in situ in the grape.

Use of anhydrofructose as a means for increasing antioxidant levels in a foodstuff (preferably a fruit or vegetable, more preferably a fresh fruit or a fresh vegetable), wherein the anhydrofructose is prepared in situ in the foodstuff.

Use of anhydrofructose as a. pharmaceutical in a foodstuff, wherein the anhydrofructose is prepared in situ in the foodstuff.

A method of administering a foodstuff comprising anhydrofructose, wherein the anhydrofructose is in a pharmaceutically acceptable amount and acts as a pharmaceutical; and wherein the anhydrofructose has been prepared in situ in the foodstuff.

Use of anhydrofructose as a nutraceutical in a foodstuff, wherein the anhydrofructose is prepared in situ in the foodstuff.

A method of administering a foodstuff comprising anhydrofructose, wherein the anhydrofructose is in a nutraceutically acceptable amount and acts as a nutraceutical; and wherein the anhydrofructose has been prepared in situ in the foodstuff.

Use of glucan lyase as a means for imparting or improving stress tolerance in a plant, wherein the glucan lyase is prepared in situ in the plant.

Use of glucan lyase as a means for imparting or improving the transformation of a grape, wherein the glucan lyase is prepared in situ in the grape.

Use of glucan lyase as a means for increasing antioxidant levels in a foodstuff (preferably a fruit or vegetable, more preferably a fresh fruit or a fresh vegetable), wherein the glucan lyase is prepared in situ in the foodstuff.

Use of glucan lyase in the preparation of a pharmaceutical in a foodstuff, wherein the glucan lyase is prepared in situ in the foodstuff.

A method of administering a foodstuff comprising an antioxidant, wherein the antioxidant is in a pharmaceutically acceptable amount and acts as a pharmaceutical; and wherein the antioxidant has been prepared in situ in the foodstuff from a glucan lyase.

Use of glucan lyase in the preparation of a nutraceutical in a foodstuff, wherein the glucan lyase is prepared in situ in the foodstuff.

A method of administering a foodstuff comprising an antioxidant, wherein the antioxidant is in a nutraceutically acceptable amount and acts as a nutraceutical; and wherein the antioxidant has been prepared in situ in the foodstuff from a glucan lyase.

Use of a nucleotide sequence coding for a glucan lyase as a means for imparting or improving stress tolerance in a plant, wherein the nucleotide sequence is expressed in situ in the plant.

Use of a nucleotide sequence coding for a glucan lyase as a means for imparting or improving the transformation of a grape, wherein the nucleotide sequence is expressed in situ in the grape.

Use of a nucleotide sequence coding for a glucan lyase as a means for increasing antioxidant levels in a foodstuff (preferably a fruit or vegetable, more preferably a fresh fruit or a fresh vegetable), wherein the nucleotide sequence is expressed in situ in the foodstuff.

Use of a nucleotide sequence coding for a glucan lyase as a means for creating a pharmaceutical in a foodstuff, wherein the nucleotide sequence is expressed in situ in the foodstuff.

A method of administering a foodstuff comprising an antioxidant, wherein the antioxidant is in a pharmaceutically acceptable amount and acts as a pharmaceutical; and wherein the antioxidant has been prepared in situ in the foodstuff by means of a nucleotide sequence coding for a glucan lyase.

Use of a nucleotide sequence coding for a glucan lyase as a means for creating a nutraceutical in a foodstuff, wherein the nucleotide sequence is expressed in situ in the foodstuff.

A method of administering a foodstuff comprising an antioxidant, wherein the antioxidant is in a nutraceutically acceptable amount and acts as a nutraceutical; and wherein the antioxidant has been prepared in situ in the foodstuff by means of a nucleotide sequence coding for a glucan lyase.

The term "nutraceutical" means a compound that is capable of acting as a nutrient (i.e. it is suitable for, for example, oral administration) as well as being capable of exhibiting a pharmaceutical effect and/or cosmetic effect.

In contrast to the usual practice of adding anti-oxidants media, such as foodstuffs, we have now found that particular anti-oxidants can be prepared in situ in the medium.

The in situ preparation of anti-oxidants is particularly advantageous in that less, or even no, additional anti-oxidants need be added to the medium, such as a food product.

The present invention is also believed to be advantageous as it provides a means of improving stress tolerance of plants.

The present invention is also advantageous as it provides a means for viably transforming grape.

The present invention is further advantageous in that it enables the levels of antioxidants in foodstuffs to be elevated. This may have beneficial health implications. In this regard, recent reports (e.g. Biotechnology Newswatch April 21 1997 "Potent Antioxidants, as strong as those in fruit, found in coffee" by Marjorie Shaffer) suggest that antioxidants have a pharmaceutical benefit, for example in preventing or suppressing cancer formation.

General in situ preparation of antioxidants in plants has been previously reviewed by Badiani et al in Agro-Food-Industry Hi-Tech (March/ April 1996 pages 21-26). It is to be noted, however, that this review does not mention preparing in situ antioxidants from a glucan, let alone by use of a recombinant glucan lyase.

Preferably, the glucan comprises α-1,4 links.

Preferably, the glucan is starch or a unit of starch.

Preferably, the glucan is a substrate for a recombinant enzyme such that contact of the glucan with the recombinant enzyme yields the anti-oxidant.

Preferably, the enzyme is a glucan lyase.

Preferably, the enzyme is an c_-l,4-glucan lyase.

Preferably, the enzyme comprises any one of the sequences shown as SEQ ID Nos 1-6, or a variant, homologue or fragment thereof.

Preferably, the enzyme is any one of the sequences shown as SEQ ID Nos 1-6.

Preferably, the enzyme is encoded by a nucleotide sequence comprising any one of the sequences shown as SEQ ID Nos 7-12, or a variant, homologue or fragment thereof.

Preferably, the enzyme is encoded by a nucleotide sequence having any one of the sequences shown as SEQ ID Nos 7-12.

Preferably, the anti-oxidant is anhydrofructose.

Preferably, the anti-oxidant is 1 ,5-D-anhydrofructose.

Preferably, the-medium is, or is used in the preparation of, a foodstuff.

Preferably, the foodstuff is a beverage.

Preferably, the beverage is an alcoholic beverage.

Preferably, the beverage is a wine.

Preferably, the anti-oxidant is prepared in situ in the component and is then released into the medium.

Preferably, the component is a plant or a part thereof.

Preferably, the component is all or part of a cereal or a fruit.

Preferably, the component is all or part of a grape.

The medium may be used as or in the preparation of a foodstuff, which includes beverages. In the alternative, the medium may be for use in polymer chemistry. In this regard, the in situ generated anti-oxidants could therefore act as oxygen scavengers during, for example, the synthesis of polymers, such as the synthesis of bio-degradable plastic.

In accordance with the present invention, the anti-oxidant (preferably anhydrofructose) is prepared in situ in the medium. In other words, the antioxidant (preferably anhydrofructose) that is prepared in situ in the medium is used as an anti-oxidant in the medium. In one emdodiment, the antioxidant (preferably anhydrofructose) that is prepared in situ in the medium is used as the main anti-oxidant in the medium.

The term "in situ in the medium" as used herein includes the anti-oxidant being prepared by action of a recombinant enzyme expressed by the component on a glucan - which glucan is a substrate for the enzyme. The term also includes the anti-oxidant being prepared by action of a recombinant enzyme expressed by the component on a glucan - which glucan is a substrate for the enzyme - within the component and the subsequent generation of the anti-oxidant. The term also includes the recombinant enzyme being expressed by the component and then being released into the medium, which enzyme acts on a glucan - which glucan is a substrate for the enzyme - present in the medium to form the anti-oxidant in the medium. The term also covers the presence or addition of another component to the medium, which component then expresses a recombinant nucleotide sequence which results in exposure of part or all of the medium to an anti-oxidant, which anti-oxidant may be a recombinant enzyme or a recombinant protein expressed and released by the other component, or it may be a product of a glucan - which glucan is a substrate for the enzyme - within the medium that has been exposed to the recombinant enzyme or the recombinant protein.

The term "by use of recombinant DNA techniques" as used herein includes the anti-oxidant being any obtained by use of a recombinant enzyme or a recombinant protein, which enzyme or protein acts on the glucan. The term also includes the anti-oxidant being any obtained by use of an enzyme or protein, which enzyme or protein acts on a recombinant glucan.

The term "starch" in relation to the present invention includes native starch, degraded starch, modified starch, including its components amylose and amylopectin, and the glucose units thereof.

The terms "variant" , "homologue" or "fragment" in relation to the enzyme include any substitution of, variation of, modification of, replacement of, deletion of or addition of one (or more) amino acid from or to the sequence providing the resultant amino acid sequence has α-glucan lyase activity, preferably having at least the same activity of any one of the enzymes shown as SEQ ID No. 1-6. In particular, the term "homologue" covers homo logy with respect to structure and/or function providing the resultant enzyme has α-glucan lyase activity. With respect to sequence homology, preferably there is at least 75 % , more preferably at least 85 % , more preferably at least 90% homology to any one of the sequences shown as SEQ ID No.s 1-6. More preferably there is at least 95 % , more preferably at least 98 % , homology to any one of the sequences shown as SEQ ID No. 1-6.

The terms "variant" , "homologue" or "fragment" in relation to the nucleotide sequence coding for the enzyme include any substitution of, variation of, modification of, replacement of, deletion of or addition of one (or more) nucleic acid from or to the sequence providing the resultant nucleotide sequence codes for an enzyme having α-glucan lyase activity, preferably having at least the same activity of any one of the enzymes shown as SEQ ID No. 1-6. In particular, the term "homologue" covers homology with respect to structure and/or function providing the resultant nucleotide sequence codes for an enzyme having α-glucan lyase activity. With respect to sequence homology, preferably there is at least 75 % , more preferably at least 85 % , more preferably at least 90 % homology to any one of the sequences shown as SEQ

ID No. 7-12. More preferably there is at least 95 %, more preferably at least 98% , homology to any one of the sequences shown as SEQ ID No. 7-12.

The above terms are synonymous with allelic variations of the sequences.

The present invention also covers nucleotide sequences that can hybridise to the nucleotide sequence of the present invention.

The term "nucleotide" in relation to the present invention includes cDNA.

According to the present invention there is therefore provided a method of preparing
s
in situ in an oxidisable medium an anti-oxidant. In a preferred embodiment, the antioxidant is anhydrofructose, more preferably 1,5-D-anhydrofructose. 1 ,5-D- anhydrofructose has been chemically synthesised (Lichtenthaler in Tetrahedron Letters Vol 21 pp 1429-1432). 1,5-D-anhydrofructose is further discussed in WO 95/10616, WO 95/10618 and GB-B-2294048.

The main advantages of using 1 ,5-D-anhydrofructose as an anti-oxidant are that it is a natural product, it is non-metabolisable, it is easy to manufacture, it is water-soluble, and it is generally non-toxic.

According to WO 95/10616, WO 95/10618 and GB-B-2294048, 1 ,5-D-anhydrofructose may be prepared by the enzymatic modification of substrates based on α-1,4-glucan by use of the enzyme c.-l,4-glucan lyase. A typical -l,4-glucan based substrate is starch.

Today, starches have found wide uses in industry mainly because they are cheap raw materials. There are many references in the art to starch. For example, starch is discussed by Salisbury and Ross in Plant Physiology (Fourth Edition, 1991, Published by Wadsworth Publishing Company - especially section 11.7). In short, however, starch is one of the principal energy reserves of plants. It is often found in colourless plastids (amyloplasts), in storage tissue and in the stroma of chloroplasts in many plants. Starch is a polysaccharide carbohydrate. It comprises two main components: amylose and/or amylopectin. Both amylose and/or amylopectin consist of straight chains of α(l ,4)-linked glucose units (ie glycosyl residues) but in addition amylopectin includes c.(l ,6) branched glucose units.

Some of the glucan lyases discussed in WO 95/10616 and WO 95/10618 that are suitable for producing 1,5-D-anhydrofructose from starch are shown as SEQ I.D. No.s 1-4. Some of the glucan lyases discussed in GB-B-2294048 that are suitable for producing 1,5-D-anhydrofructose from starch are shown as SEQ I.D. No.s 5-6.

Some of the nucleotide sequences coding for glucan lyases discussed in WO 95/10616 and WO 95/10618 that are suitable for producing 1,5-D-anhydrofructose from starch are shown as SEQ I.D. No.s 7-10. Some of the nucleotide sequences coding for glucan lyases discussed in GB-B-2294048 that are suitable for producing 1 ,5-D- anhydrofructose from starch are shown as SEQ I.D. No.s 11-12.

A further glucan lyase is discussed in WO 94/09122.

The recombinant nucleotide sequences coding for the enzyme may be cloned from sources such as a fungus, preferably Morchella costata or Morchella vulgaris, or from a fungally infected algae, preferably Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, or from algae lone, preferably Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis.

In a preferred embodiment, the 1 ,5-D-anhydrofructose is prepared in situ by treating an c.-l ,4-glucan with a recombinant «-l ,4-glucan lyase, such as any one of those presented as SEQ I.D. No.s 1-6.

Detailed commentary on how to prepare the enzymes shown as sequences SEQ I.D. No.s 1-6 may be found in the teachings of WO 95/10616, WO 95/10618 and GB-B-2294048. Likewise, detailed commentary on how to isolate and clone the nucleotide sequences SEQ I.D. No.s 7-12 may be found in the teachings of WO 95/10616, WO 95/10618 and GB-B-2294048.

If the glucan contains links other than and in addition to the α-1,4- links the recombinant α-l ,4-glucan lyase can be used in conjunction with a suitable reagent that can break the other links - such as a recombinant hydrolase - preferably a recombinant glucanohydrolase.

General teachings of recombinant DNA techniques may be found in Sambrook . , Fritsch, E.F. , Maniatis T. (Editors) Molecular Cloning. A laboratory manual. Second edition. Cold Spring Harbour Laboratory Press. New York 1989.

In order to express a nucleotide sequence, the host organism can be a prokaryotic or a eukaryotic organism. Examples of suitable prokaryotic hosts include E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. Teachings on the transformation of prokaryotic hosts is well documented in the art, for example see Sambrook et al (Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, 2nd edition, 1989, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press). If a prokaryotic host is used then the gene may need to be suitably modified before transformation - such as by removal of introns.

In one embodiment, the host organism can be of the genus Aspergillus, such as Aspergillus niger. A transgenic Aspergillus can be prepared by following the teachings of Rambosek, J. and Leach, J. 1987 (Recombinant DNA in filamentous fungi: Progress and Prospects. CRC Crit. Rev. Biotechnol. 6:357-393), Davis R.W. 1994 (Heterologous gene expression and protein secretion in Aspergillus. In: Martinelli S.D. , Kinghorn J.R.( Editors) Aspergillus: 50 years on. Progress in industrial microbiology vol 29. Elsevier Amsterdam 1994. pp 525-560), Ballance, D.J. 1991 (Transformation systems for Filamentous Fungi and an Overview of Fungal Gene structure. In: Leong, S.A. , Berka R.M. (Editors) Molecular Industrial Mycology. Systems and Applications for Filamentous Fungi. Marcel Dekker Inc. New York 1991. pp 1-29) and Turner G. 1994 (Vectors for genetic manipulation. In: Martinelli S.D. , Kinghorn J.R.( Editors) Aspergillus: 50 years on. Progress in industrial microbiology vol 29. Elsevier Amsterdam 1994. pp. 641-666). However, the following commentary provides a summary of those teachings for producing transgenic Aspergillus.

For almost a century, filamentous fungi have been widely used in many types of industry for the production of organic compounds and enzymes. For example, traditional Japanese koji and soy fermentations have used Aspergillus sp. Also, in this century Aspergillus niger has been used for production of organic acids particular citric acid and for production of various enzymes for use in industry.

There are two major reasons why filamentous fungi have been so widely used in industry. First filamentous fungi can produce high amounts of extracelluar products, for example enzymes and organic compounds such as antibiotics or organic acids. Second filamentous fungi can grow on low cost substrates such as grains, bran, beet pulp etc. The same reasons have made filamentous fungi attractive organisms as hosts for heterologous expression of recombinant enzymes according to the present invention.

In order to prepare the transgenic Aspergillus, expression constructs are prepared by inserting a requisite nucleotide sequence into a construct designed for expression in filamentous fungi.

Several types of constructs used for heterologous expression have been developed. These constructs can contain a promoter which is active in fungi. Examples of promoters include a fungal promoter for a highly expressed extracelluar enzyme, such as the glucoamylase promoter or the α-amylase promoter. The nucleotide sequence can be fused to a signal sequence which directs the protein encoded by the nucleotide sequence to be secreted. Usually a signal sequence of fungal origin is used. A terminator active in fungi ends the expression system.

Another type of expression system has been developed in fungi where the nucleotide sequence can be fused to a smaller or a larger part of a fungal gene encoding a stable protein. This can stabilize the protein encoded by the nucleotide sequence. In such a system a cleavage site, recognized by a specific protease, can be introduced between the fungal protein and the protein encoded by the nucleotide sequence, so the produced fusion protein can be cleaved at this position by the specific protease thus liberating the protein encoded by the nucleotide sequence. By way of example, one can introduce a site which is recognized by a KEX-2 like peptidase found in at least some Aspergilli. Such a fusion leads to cleavage in vivo resulting in protection of the expressed product and not a larger fusion protein.

Heterologous expression in Aspergillus has been reported for several genes coding for bacterial, fungal, vertebrate and plant proteins. The proteins can be deposited intracellularly if the nucleotide sequence is not fused to a signal sequence. Such proteins will accumulate in the cytoplasm and will usually not be glycosylated which can be an advantage for some bacterial proteins. If the nucleotide sequence is equipped with a signal sequence the protein will accumulate extracelluarly.

With regard to product stability and host strain modifications, some heterologous proteins are not very stable when they are secreted into the culture fluid of fungi.

Most fungi produce several extracelluar proteases which degrade heterologous proteins. To avoid this problem special fungal strains with reduced protease production have been used as host for heterologous production.

For the transformation of filamentous fungi, several transformation protocols have been developed for many filamentous fungi (Ballance 1991 , ibid). Many of them are based on preparation of protoplasts and introduction of DNA into the protoplasts using PEG and Ca2+ ions. The transformed protoplasts then regenerate and the transformed fungi are selected using various selective markers. Among the markers used for transformation are a number of auxotrophic markers such as argB, trpC, niaD and pyrG, antibiotic resistance markers such as benomyl resistance, hygromycin resistance and phleomycin resistance. A commonly used transformation marker is the amdS gene of A. nidulans which in high copy number allows the fungus to grow with acrylamide as the sole nitrogen source.

In another embodiment the transgenic organism can be a yeast. In this regard, yeast have also been widely used as a vehicle for heterologous gene expression. The species Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a long history of industrial use, including its use for heterologous gene expression. Expression of heterologous genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been reviewed by Goodey et al (1987, Yeast Biotechnology, D R Berry et al, eds, pp 401-429, Allen and Unwin, London) and by King et al (1989, Molecular and Cell Biology of Yeasts, E F Walton and G T Yarronton, eds, pp 107-133, Blackie, Glasgow).

For several reasons Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well suited for heterologous gene expression. First, it is non-pathogenic to humans and it is incapable of producing certain endotoxins. Second, it has a long history of safe use following centuries of commercial exploitation for various purposes. This has led to wide public acceptability. Third, the extensive commercial use and research devoted to the organism has resulted in a wealth of knowledge about the genetics and physiology as well as large-scale fermentation characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

A review of -the principles of heterologous gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and secretion of gene products is given by E Hinchcliffe E Kenny (1993, "Yeast as a vehicle for the expression of heterologous genes" , Yeasts, Vol 5, Anthony H Rose and J Stuart Harrison, eds, 2nd edition, Academic Press Ltd.).

Several types of yeast vectors are available, including integrative vectors, which require recombination with the host genome for their maintenance, and autonomously replicating plasmid vectors.

In order to prepare the transgenic Saccharomyces, expression constructs are prepared by inserting the nucleotide sequence into a construct designed for expression in yeast. Several types of constructs used for heterologous expression have been developed. The constructs contain a promoter active in yeast fused to the nucleotide sequence, usually a promoter of yeast origin, such as the GAL1 promoter, is used. Usually a signal sequence of yeast origin, such as the sequence encoding the SUC2 signal pep tide, is used. A terminator active in yeast ends the expression system.

For the transformation of yeast several transformation protocols have been developed. For example, a transgenic Saccharomyces can be prepared by following the teachings of Hinnen et al (1978, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 75, 1929); Beggs, J D (1978, Nature, London, 275, 104); and Ito, H et al (1983, J Bacteriology 153, 163-168).

The transformed yeast cells are selected using various selective markers. Among the markers used for transformation are a number of auxotrophic markers such as LEU2, HIS4 and TRP1 , and dominant antibiotic resistance markers such as aminoglycoside antibiotic markers, eg G418.

Another host organism is a plant. In this regard, the art is replete with references for preparing transgenic plants. Two documents that provide some background commentary on the types of techniques that may be employed to prepare transgenic plants are EP-B-0470145 and CA-A-2006454 - some of which commentary is presented below.

The basic principle in the construction of genetically modified plants is to insert genetic information in the plant genome so as to obtain a stable maintenance of the inserted genetic material.

Several techniques exist for inserting the genetic information, the two main principles being direct introduction of the genetic information and introduction of the genetic information by use of a vector system. A review of the general techniques may be found in articles by Potrykus (Annu Rev Plant Physiol Plant Mol Biol [1991] 42:205-225) and Christou (Agro-Food-Industry Hi-Tech March/ April 1994 17-27).

Thus, in one aspect, the present invention relates to a vector system which carries a recombinant nucleotide sequence and which is capable of introducing the nucleotide sequence into the genome of an organism, such as a plant, and wherein the nucleotide sequence is capable of preparing in situ an anti-oxidant.

The vector system may comprise one vector, but it can comprise at least two vectors. In the case of two vectors, the vector system is normally referred to as a binary vector system. Binary vector systems are described in further detail in Gynheung An et al. (1980), Binary Vectors, Plant Molecular Biology Manual A3, 1-19.

One extensively employed system for transformation of plant cells with a given promoter or nucleotide sequence or construct is based on the use of a Ti plasmid from Agrobacterium tumefaciens or a Ri plasmid from Agrobacterium rhizogenes (An et al. (1986), Plant Physiol. 81 , 301-305 and Butcher D.N. et al. (1980), Tissue Culture Methods for Plant Pathologists, eds. : D.S. Ingrams and J.P. Helgeson, 203-208).

Several different Ti and Ri plasmids have been constructed which are suitable for the construction of the plant or plant cell constructs described above.

The nucleotide sequence of the present invention should preferably be inserted into the Ti-plasmid between the border -sequences of the T-DNA or adjacent a T-DNA sequence so as to avoid disruption of the sequences immediately surrounding the T-DNA borders, as at least one of these regions appear to be essential for insertion of modified T-DNA into the plant genome.

As will be understood from the above explanation, if the organism is a plant, then the vector system of the present invention is preferably one which contains the sequences necessary to infect the plant (e.g. the vir region) and at least one border part of a T-DNA sequence, the border part being located on the same vector as the genetic construct. Preferably, the vector system is an Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti-plasmid or an Agrobacterium rhizogenes Ri-plasmid or a derivative thereof, as these plasmids are well-known and widely employed in the construction of transgenic plants, many vector systems exist which are based on these plasmids or derivatives thereof.

In the construction of a transgenic plant the nucleotide sequence or construct or vector of the present invention may be first constructed in a microorganism in which the vector can replicate and which is easy to manipulate before insertion into the plant. An example of a useful microorganism is E. coli. , but other microorganisms having the above properties may be used. When a vector of a vector system as defined above has been constructed in E. coli. it is transferred, if necessary, into a suitable Agrobacterium strain, e.g. Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The Ti-plasmid harbouring the first nucleotide sequence or construct of the invention is thus preferably transferred into a suitable Agrobacterium strain, e.g. A. tumefaciens, so as to obtain an Agrobacterium cell harbouring the promoter, or nucleotide sequence or construct of the invention, which DNA is subsequently transferred into the plant cell to be modified.

As reported in CA-A-2006454, a large number of cloning vectors are available which contain a replication system in E. coli and a marker which allows a selection of the transformed cells. The vectors contain for example pBR322, the pUC series, the M13 mp series, pACYC 184 etc. In this way, the promoter or nucleotide or construct of the present invention can be introduced into a suitable restriction position in the vector. -The contained plasmid is used for the transformation in E. coli. The E. coli cells are cultivated in a suitable nutrient medium and then harvested and lysed. The plasmid is then recovered and then analysed - such as by any one or more of the following techniques: sequence analysis, restriction analysis, electrophoresis and further biochemical-molecular biological methods. After each manipulation, the used DNA sequence can be restricted or selectively amplified by PCR techniques and connected with the next DNA sequence. Each sequence can be cloned in the same or different plasmid.

After each introduction method of the nucleotide sequence or construct or vector according to the present invention in the plants the presence and/or insertion of further DNA sequences may be necessary. If, for example, for the transformation the Ti- or Ri-plasmid of the plant cells is used, at least the right boundary and often however the right and the left boundary of the Ti- and Ri-plasmid T-DNA, as flanking areas of the introduced genes, can be connected. The use of T-DNA for the transformation of plant cells has been intensively studied and is described in EP-A- 120516; Hoekema, in: The Binary Plant Vector System Offset-drukkerij Kanters B.B. , Alblasserdam, 1985, Chapter V; Fraley, et al. , Crit. Rev. Plant Sci. , 4: 1-46; and An et al. , EMBO J. (1985) 4:277-284.

Direct infection of plant tissues by Agrobacterium is a simple technique which has been widely employed and which is described in Butcher D.N. et al. (1980), Tissue Culture Methods for Plant Patholo gists, eds. : D.S. Ingrams and J.P. Helgeson, 203-208. For further teachings on this topic see Potrykus (Annu Rev Plant Physiol Plant Mol Biol [1991] 42:205-225) and Christou (Agro-Food-Industry Hi-Tech March/ April 1994 17-27). With this technique, infection of a plant may be done on a certain part or tissue of the plant, i.e. on a part of a leaf, a root, a stem or another part of the plant.

Typically, with direct infection of plant tissues by Agrobacterium carrying the first nucleotide sequence or the construct, a plant to be infected is wounded, e.g. by cutting the plant with a razor or puncturing the plant with a needle or rubbing the plant with an abrasive. The wound is then inoculated with the Agrobacterium. The inoculated plant or plant part is then grown on a suitable culture medium.

When plant cells are constructed, these cells are grown and, optionally,- maintained in a medium according to the present invention following well-known tissue culturing methods - such as by culmring the cells in a suitable culture medium supplied with the necessary growth factors such as amino acids, plant hormones, vitamins, etc, but wherein the culture medium comprises a component according to the present invention. Regeneration of the transformed cells into genetically modified plants may be accomplished using known methods for the regeneration of plants from cell or tissue cultures, for example by selecting the transformed shoots and by subculturing the shoots on a medium containing the appropriate nutrients, plant hormones, etc.

Further teachings on plant transformation may be found in EP-A-0449375.

Reference may even be made to Spngstad et al (1995 Plant Cell Tissue Organ Culture 40 pp 1-15) as these authors present a general overview on transgenic plant construction.

In one embodiment, the plant is a grapevine. There are a number of teachings in the art on how to prepare transformed grapevines. For example, reference may be made to Baribault et al (J Exp Bot 41 (229) 1990 1045-1050), Baribault et al (Plant Cell Rep 8 (3) 1989 137-140), Scorza et al (J Am Soc Horticultural Science 121 (4) 1996 616-619), Kikkert et al (Plant Cell Reports 15 (5) 1996 311-316), Golles et al (Acta Hortic 1997 vol 447 Number: Horticultural Biotechnology in Vitro Culture and Breeding Pages 265-275), Gray and Scorza (WO-A-97/49277) and Simon Robinson et al (Conference abstracts and paper presented in Biotechnology - Food and Health for the 21st Century, Adelaide, Australia, 1998). By way of example Robinson et al (ibid) disclose a method for transforming grapevine wherein somatic embryos are induced on callus formed from another tissue and Agrobacterium infection is used to transfer target genes into the embryo tissue.

Further reference may be made to the teachings of Andrew Walker in Nature Biotechnology (Vol 14, May 1996, page 582) who states that:

"The grape, one of the most important fruit plants in the world, has
been difficult to engineer because of its high levels of tannins and
phenols, which interfere with cell culture and transformation; the
compounds oxidize quickly and promote the decay of grape cells. "

In that same edition of Nature Biotechnology, Perl et al (pages 624-628) report on the use of the combination of polyvinylpolypyrrolidone and dithiothreitol to improve the viability of grape transformation during Agrobacterium infection.

Hence, the present invention provides an alternative means for transforming grape. In this regard, the antioxidant that is prepared in situ by a grape transformed in accordance with the present invention improves the viability of grape transformation during Agrobacterium infection.

Thus, according to one aspect of the present invention, there is provided the use of an antioxidant prepared in situ in order to effectively transform a grape.

In some instances, it is desirable for the recombinant enzyme or protein to be easily secreted into the medium to act as or to generate an anti-oxidant therein. In such cases, the DNA encoding the recombinant enzyme is fused to inter alia an appropriate signal sequence, an appropriate promoter and van appropriate terminator from the chosen host.

For example, for expression in Aspergillus niger the gpdA (from the Glyceraldehyde- 3 -phosphate dehydrogenase gene of Aspergillus nidulans) promoter and signal sequence is fused to the 5' end of the DNA encoding the mature lyase. The terminator sequence from the A. niger trpC gene is placed 3' to the gene (Punt, P.J. et al 1991 - (1991): J. Biotech. 17, 19-34). This construction is inserted into a vector containing a replication origin and selection origin for E. coli and a selection marker for A. niger. -Examples of selection markers for A. niger are the amdS gene, the argB gene, the pyrG gene, the hygB gene, the BmlR gene which all have been used for selection of transformants. This plasmid can be transformed into A. niger and the mature lyase can be recovered from the culture medium of the transformants. Eventually the construction could be transformed into a protease deficient strain to reduce the proteolytic degradation of the lyase in the medium (Archer D.B. et al 1992 -Biotechnol. Lett. 14, 357-362).

In addition, and as indicated above, aside from using Aspergillus niger as the host, there are other industrial important microorganisms which could be used as expression systems. Examples of these other hosts include: Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus sp., Trichoderma sp. , Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces sp. , Hansenula sp., Pichia sp. , Bacillus subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus sp. , Streptomyces sp. or E. coli.

In accordance with the present invention, a suitable marker or selection means may be introduced into the host that is to be transformed with the nucleotide sequence. Examples of suitable markers or selection means are described in any one of WO-A-93/05163, WO-A-94/20627, GB patent application No. 9702591.0 (filed 7 February 1997), GB patent application No. 9702576.1 (filed 7 February 1997), GB patent application No. 9702539.9 (filed 7 February 1997), GB patent application No. 9702510.0 (filed 7 February 1997) and GB patent application No. 9702592.8 (filed 7 February 1997).
s
In summation, the present invention relates to a process comprising preparing a medium that comprises an anti-oxidant and at least one other component, the process comprising preparing in situ in the medium the anti-oxidant; and wherein the antioxidant is prepared from a glucan by use of recombinant DNA techniques and/or the anti-oxidant is prepared by use of a recombinant glucan lyase.

In a preferred- embodiment, the present invention relates to a process a process of preparing a medium that comprises an anti-oxidant and at least one other component, the process comprising preparing in situ in the medium the anti-oxidant; and wherein the anti-oxidant is prepared from a glucan by use of a recombinant glucan lyase.

In a more preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a process of preparing a medium that comprises an anti-oxidant and at least one other component, the process comprising preparing in situ in the medium the anti-oxidant; wherein the anti-oxidant is prepared from a glucan by use of a recombinant glucan lyase; and wherein the anti-oxidant is anhydro-fructose.

The present invention will now be described only by way of example.

TRANSGENIC GRAPE

Transformed grapes are prepared following the teachings of Perl et al (ibid) but wherein the use of the combination of polyvinylpolypyrrolidone and dithiothreitol is optional. In these studies, the grapes are transformed with any one of the nucleotide sequences presented as SEQ ID No. 7-12. The transformation leads to in situ preparation of 1 ,5-D-anhydrofructose. The transformed grapes are beneficial for one or more of the reasons mentioned earlier.

Details on these studies are as follows.

Tissue-culture systems for transformation studies

The long term somatic embryogenic callus culture is developed from the vegetative tissues of anthers of Vitis vinifera CV Superior Seedless. Methods for another culture, induction of somatic embryogenesis and maintenance of embryogenic cultures, are previously described (Perl et al, 1995, Plant Sci 104: 193-200). Briefly, embryogenic calli are maintained on solidified (0.25 % gelrite) MS medium (Murashige and Skoog, 1962, Physiol Plant 15: 473-497) supplemented with 6% sucrose, 2 mg/L 2,4-diclorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 5 mg/L Indole-3-aspartic acid (IASP), 0.2 mg/L 6-benzyladenine (BAP) and 1 mg/L abscisic acid (ABA). Proembryogenic calli are induced by transferring the calli to MS medium supplemented with the same phytohormones, but 2,4-D is substituted with 2 mg/L 2-naphthoxy acetic acid (NOA). This stage is used for transformation experiments.

Agrobacterium strains

For studying the sensitivity of grape embryogenic calli to the presence of different Agrobacterium strains, or for stable transformation experiments, cocultivation is attempted using the following A tumefaciens strains: EHA 101-p492 (Perl et al. 1993, Bio/Technology 11:715-718); LBA 4404-pGPTV (Becker et al, 1992. Plant Mol Biol 20: 1195-1197); and GVE 3101-pPCV91 (Vancanneyt et al, 1990, Mol Gen Genet 220: 245-250). These strains contain the binary vectors conferring resistance to kanamycin (nptIL), basta (bar) and hygromycin (hpt), respectively, all under the control of the nopalin-synthase (NOS) promoter and terminator. Bacteria are cultured with the proper antibiotics in liquid LB medium for 24 hours at 28 °C at 200 rpm.

Cocultivation

For studying the sensitivity of grape embryogenic calli to different Agrobacterium strains, bacterial cultures with different optical densities (0.1-0.7 at 630 nm) are prepared from an overnight culture of Agrobacterium strains. Bacteria are centrifuged 5 minutes, 5000 rpm and resuspended in antibiotic free McCown's Woody Plant Medium (WPM) (Lloyd and McCown, 1981, Int Plant Prop Soc Proc 30: 421-427). Three grams fresh weight of embryogenic calli (7 days after transfer to NOA containing medium) are resuspended in 10 ml of overnight cultured bacterial suspensions for 5 minutes, dry blotted and transferred to Petri dishes containing regeneration medium [basal WPM medium supplemented with thidiazuron (TDZ) (0.5 mg/L), Zeatin riboside (ZR) (0.5 mg/L), and sucrose (3 %)] . The regeneration medium is solidified with gelrite (0.25 % w/v) and the calli, after initial drainage of excess bacteria, are cocultivated in the dark at 25 °C for different times (5 minutes up to 7 days). .For stable transformation experiments, inoculum (OD 0.6 at 630 nm) is prepared from an overnight culture of LBA 4404 or GVE 3101. Bacteria are centrifuged 5 minutes, 5000 rpm and resuspended in antibiotic-free WPM medium. Embryogenic calli (3g fresh weight) are resuspended in 10 ml of bacteria for 5 minutes, dry blotted and transferred to Petri dishes containing solidified (0.25 % w/v) gelrite regeneration medium supplemented with different antioxidants. The calli are cocultivated for 48 hours in the dark at 25 °C.

Selective culture

Following 48 hours of cocultivation, the embryogenic callus is maintained in the dark for 7 days on antioxidant containing regeneration medium. Subsequently, the calli are collected on a sterile metal screen and transferred to fresh WPM regeneration medium at 25 °C under 40 μE/m2/s (white fluorescent tubes). All regeneration media are supplemented with 400 mg/L claforan, 1.5 g/L malt extract and different selectable markers: kanamycin (50-500 mg/L), hygromycin (15 mg/L) and Basta (1-10 mg/L). Periodic increases in hygromycin concentration are used. The putative transformed calli are cultured on regeneration medium supplemented with 15 mg/L hygromycin. Every two weeks the regenerating calli are transferred to fresh medium supplemented with 20 and 25 mg/L hygromycin respectively. Control, untransformed grape calli are also cultured on selective media and are periodically exposed to increasing hygromycin concentrations. Green adventitious embryos, which developed on calli cultured for 8-10 weeks on selective regeneration medium, are transferred to germination medium. Embryo germination, rooting and subsequent plantlet development are induced on WPM as described (Perl et al, 1995, Plant Sci 104: 193-200), supplemented with 25 mg/L hygromycin or 10 mg/L basta. Conversion of vitrified abnormal plantlets into normal-looking grape plantlets are obtained using solidified WPM medium supplemented with 0.1 mg/L NAA as described (Perl et al, 1995, Plant Sci 104: 193-200).

TRANSGENIC POTATOES

General teachings on potato transformation may be found in our copending patent applications PCT/EP96/03053, PCT/EP96/03052 and PCT/EP94/01082 (the contents of each of which are incorporated herein by reference).

For the present studies, the following protocol is adopted.

Plasmid construction

The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LB A 4404, containing the helper vir plasmid pRAL4404 (Hoekema et al, 1983 Nature 303 pp 179-180), is cultured on YMB agar (K2HPO4.3H2O 660 mg A MgSO4 200 mg l 1, NaCl 100 mg l 1, mannitol 10 g l"1, yeast extract 400 mg l"1, 0.8% w/v agar, pH 7.0) containing 100 mg l"1 rifampicin and 500 mg l"1 streptomycin sulphate. Transformation with pVICTOR IV GNG E35S nagB IV2' or pVICTOR IV GNG rbc nagB IV2' or pVICTOR IV GNG E35S nagB' (which correspond to each of pVICTOR IV GNG E35S nagB IV2 or pVICTOR IV GNG rbc nagB IV2 or pVICTOR IV GNG E35S nagB but wherein each of those plasmids also contains any one of the nucleotide sequences shown as SEQ ID No.s. 7-12 operatively linked to a functional promoter) is accomplished using the freeze-thaw method of Holters et al (1978 Mol Gen Genet 163 181-187) and transformants are selected on YMB agar containing 100 mg l"1 rifampicin and 500 mg l"1 streptomycin, and 50 mg l"1 gentamycin sulphate.

Transformation of plants

Shoot cultures of Solanum tuberosum cv Saturna are maintained on LS agar containing Murashige Skoog basal salts (Sigma M6899) (Murashige and Skoog, 1965, Physiol Plant 15 473-497) with 2 μM silver thiosulphate, and nutrients and vitamins as described by Linsmaier and Skoog (1965 Physiol Plant 18 100-127). Cultures are maintained at 25 °C with a 16h daily photoperiod. After approximately 40 days, subculturing is performed during which leaves are removed, and the shoots cut into mononodal segments of approximately 8 mm length.

Shoot cultures of approximately 40 days maturity (5-6 cm height) are cut into 8 mm internodal segments which are placed into liquid LS-medium containing Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformed with pVICTOR IV GNG E35S nagB IV2' or pVICTOR IV GNG rbc nagB IV2' or pVICTOR IV GNG E35S nagB' (A660 = 0.5, pathlength 1 cm). Following incubation at room temperature for 30 minutes, the segments are dried by blotting on to sterile filter paper and transferred to LS agar (0.8% w/v containing 2 mg l"1 2,4-D and 500 μg l"1 trans-zeatin. The explants are covered with filter paper, moistened with LS medium, and covered with a cloth for three days at 25 °C. Following this treatment, the segments are washed with liquid LS medium containing 800 mg l"1 carbenicillin, and transferred on to LS agar (0.8% w/v) containing 1 mg I"1 trans-zeatin, 100 μg l"1 gibberellic acid (GA3), with sucrose (eg 7.5 g l"1) and glucosamine (eg 2.5 g l"1) as the selection agent.

The segments are sub-cultured to fresh substrate each 3-4 weeks. In 3 to 4 weeks, shoots develop from the segments and the formation of new shoots continues for 3-4 months.

Rooting of regenerated shoots

The regenerated shoots are transferred to rooting substrate composed of LS-substrate, agar (8 g/1) and carbenicillin (800 mg/1).

The transgenic plants may be verified by performing a GUS assay on the co- introduced Aglucuronidase gene according to Hodal, L. et al. (PL Sci. (1992), 87:

115-122).

Alternatively, the transgenic genotype of the regenerated shoot may be verified by performing NPTII assays (Radke, S. E. et al, Theor. Appl. Genet. (1988), 75: 685- 694) or by performing PCR analysis according to Wang et al (1993, NAR 21 pp 4153-4154).

Transfer to sou

The newly rooted plants (height approx. 2-3 cms) are transplanted from rooting substrate to soil and placed in a growth chamber (21°C, 16 hour light 200-400uE/m2/sec). When the plants are well established they are transferred to the greenhouse, where they are grown until tubers had developed and the upper part of the plants are senescing.

Harvesting

The potatoes are harvested after about 3 months.

TRANSGENIC MAIZE PLANTS

Introduction

Since the first publication of production of transgenic plants in 1983 (Leemans, 1993 Biotechnology 11 s22), there have been numerous publications of production of transgenic plants including especially dicotyledon crop plants.

Until very recently there are very few reports on successful production of transgenic monocotyledononary crop plants. This relatively slow development within monocots are due to two causes. Firstly, until the early 1980s, efficient regeneration of plants from cultured cells and tissues of monocots had proven very difficult. This problem is ultimately solved by the culture of explants from immature and embryogenic tissue, which retain their morphogenic potential on nutrient media containing plant growth regulators. Secondly, the monocots are not a natural host for Agrobacterium tumefaciens, meaning that the successful developed techniques within the dicots using their natural vector Agrobacterium tumefaciens is unsuccessful for many years in the monocots.

Nevertheless, it is now possible to successfully transformation and produce fertile transgenic plants of maize using methods such as: (1) Silicon Carbide Whiskers; (2) Particle Bombardment; (3) DNA Uptake by PEG treated protoplast; or (4) DNA Uptake in Electroporation of Tissue. Each of these methods - which are reviewed by Thompson (1995 Euphtytica 85 pp 75-80) - may be used to prepare inter alia transgenic maize according to the present invention.

In particular, the particle Gun method has been successfully used for the transformation of monocots. However, EP-A-0604662 reports on a different method of transforming monocotyledons. The method comprises transforming cultured tissues of a monocotyledon under or after dedifferentiation with Agrobacterium containing a super binary vector as a selectable marker a hygromycin-resistant gene is used. Production of transgenic calli and plant is demonstrated using the hygromycin selection. This method may be used to prepare inter alia transgenic maize according to the present invention.

Subsequent to the method of EP-A-0604662, EP-A-0672752 reports on non-dedifferentiated immature embryos. In this regard, both hygromycin-resistance and PPT-resistance genes are used as the selectable marker, with PPT giving rise to 10% or more independent transformed plants. This method may be used to prepare inter alia transgenic maize according to the present invention.

To date, it would appear that transgenic maize plants can be successfully produced from easily-culturable varieties - such as the inbred line A188. In this regard, see the teachings of Ishida et al (1996 Nature Biotechnology 14 pp 745-750). The method disclosed by these workers may be used to prepare inter alia transgenic maize according to the present invention.

Vasil (1996 Nature Biotechnology 14 pp 702-703) presents a further review article on transformation of maize. Even though it is possible to prepare transformed maize by use of, for example, particle Gun mediated transformation, for the present studies the following protocol is adopted.

Plasmid construction

The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LB A 4404, containing the helper vir plasmid pRAL4404 (Hoekema et al, 1983 Nature 303 pp 179-180), is cultured on YMB agar (K2HPO4.3H2O 660 mg l"1, MgSO4 200 mg l 1, NaCl 100 mg 7, mannitol 10 g l"1, yeast extract 400 mg l"1, 0.8% w/v agar, pH 7.0) containing 100 mg l"1 rifampicin and 500 mg l"1 streptomycin sulphate. Transformation with pVICTOR IV GNG E35S nagB IV2' or pVICTOR IV GNG rbc nagB IV2' or pVICTOR IV GNG E35S nagB' is accomplished using the freeze-thaw method of Holters et al (1978 Mol Gen Genet 163 181-187) and transformants are selected on YMB agar containing 100 mg l"1 rifampicin and 500 mg l"1 streptomycin, and 50 mg l"1 gentamycin sulphate.

Isolation and cocultivation of explants

Immature embryos of, for example, maize line A188 of the size between 1.5 to 2.5 mm are isolated and cocultivated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA 4404 in N6-AS for 2-3 days at 25 °C under illumination. Thereafter, the embryos are washed with sterilized water containing 250 mg/1 of cefotaxime and transferred to an LS medium and 250 mg/1 cefotaxime and glucosamine in concentrations of up to 100 mg/1 (the medium is hereafter called LSS1).

Conditions for the selection of transgenic plants

The explants are cultured for three weeks on LSS1 medium and then transferred to an LS medium containing glucosamine and cefotaxime. After three weeks on this medium, green shoots are isolated.

Rooting of transformed shoots

Transformed shoots are transferred to an MS medium containing 2 mg/1 for rooting. After four weeks on this medium, plantlets are transferred to pots with sterile soil for acclimatisation.

TRANSGENIC GUAR PLANTS

Transformation of guar cotyledonary explants is performed according to Joersbo and Okkels (PCT/DK95/00221) using Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 harbouring a suitable plasmid.

Other plants may be transformed in accordance with the present invention, such as other fruits, other vegetables, and other plants such as coffee plants, tea plants etc.

Other modifications of the present invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

SEQUENCES
( 1 ) GENERAL INFORMATION
( i ) APPLICANT
(A) NAME DANISCO A/S
(B) STREET LANGEBROGADE 1
(C) CITY COPENHAGEN
(D) STATE COPENHAGEN K
(E) COUNTRY DENMARK
(F) POSTAL CODE (ZIP) DK-1001
(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO 1
(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS
(A) LENGTH 1088 ami no acids
(B) TYPE amino acid
(D) TOPOLOGY linear
(n) MOLECULE TYPE protein
(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION SEQ ID NO 1
Met Phe Ser Thr Leu Ala Phe Val Ala Pro Ser Ala Leu Gly Ala Ser 1 5 10 15

Thr Phe Val Gly Ala Glu Val Arg Ser Asn Val Arg He His Ser Ala
20 25 30
Phe Pro Ala Val His Thr Ala Thr Arg Lys Thr Asn Arg Leu Asn Val

35 40 45
Ser Met Thr Ala Leu Ser Asp Lys Gin Thr Ala Thr Ala Gly Ser Thr

50 55 60
Asp Asn Pro Asp Gly He Asp Tyr Lys Thr Tyr Asp Tyr Val Gly Val 65 70 75 80

Trp Gly Phe Ser Pro Leu Ser Asn Thr Asn Trp Phe Ala Ala Gly Ser
85 90 95

Ser Thr Pro Gly Gly He Thr Asp Trp Thr Ala Thr Met Asn Val Asn
100 105 110

Phe Asp Arg He Asp Asn Pro Ser He Thr Val Gin His Pro Val Gin

115 120 125
Val Gin Val Thr Ser Tyr Asn Asn Asn Ser Tyr Arg Val Arg Phe Asn

130 135 140
Pro Asp Gly Pro He Arg Asp Val Thr Arg Gly Pro He Leu Lys Gin 145 150 155 160

Gin Leu Asp Trp He Arg Thr Gin Glu Leu Ser Glu Gly Cys Asp Pro
165 170 175

Gly Met Thr Phe Thr Ser Glu Gly Phe Leu Thr Phe Glu Thr Lys Asp
180 185 190
Leu Ser Val He He Tyr Gly Asn Phe Lys Thr Arg Val Thr Arg Lys

195 200 205
Ser Asp Gly Lys Val He Met Glu Asn Asp Glu Val Gly Thr Ala Ser

210 215 220
Ser Gly Asn Lys Cys Arg Gly Leu Met Phe Val Asp Arg Leu Tyr Gly 225 230 235 240

Asn Ala He Ala Ser Val Asn Lys Asn Phe Arg Asn Asp Ala Val Lys
245 250 255
Gin Glu Gly Phe Tyr Gly Ala Gly Glu Val Asn Cys Lys Tyr Gin Asp
260 265 270
Thr Tyr He Leu Glu Arg Thr Gly He Ala Met Thr Asn Tyr Asn Tyr

275 280 285
Asp Asn Leu Asn Tyr Asn Gin Trp Asp Leu Arg Pro Pro His His Asp

290 295 300
Gly Ala Leu Asn Pro Asp Tyr Tyr He Pro Met Tyr Tyr Ala Ala Pro 305 310 315 320

Trp Leu He Val Asn Gly Cys Ala Gly Thr Ser Glu Gin Tyr Ser Tyr
325 330 335
Gly Trp Phe Met Asp Asn Val Ser Gin Ser Tyr Met Asn Thr Gly Asp
340 345 350 Thr Thr Trp Asn Ser Gly Gin Glu Asp Leu Ala Tyr Met Gly Ala Gin

355 360 365
Tyr Gly Pro Phe Asp Gin His Phe Val Tyr Gly Ala Gly Gly Gly Met

370 375 380
Glu Cys Val Val Thr Ala Phe Ser Leu Leu Gin Gly Lys Glu Phe Glu 385 390 395 400

Asn Gin Val Leu Asn Lys Arg Ser Val Met Pro Pro Lys Tyr Val Phe

405 410 415

Gly Phe Phe Gin Gly Val Phe Gly Thr Ser Ser Leu Leu Arg Ala His

420 425 430
Met Pro Ala Gly Glu Asn Asn He Ser Val Glu Glu He Val Glu Gly

435 440 445
Tyr Gin Asn Asn Asn Phe Pro Phe Glu Gly Leu Ala Val Asp Val Asp

450 455 460
Met Gin Asp Asn Leu Arg Val Phe Thr Thr Lys Gly Glu Phe Trp Thr 465 470 475 480

Ala Asn Arg Val Gly Thr Gly Gly Asp Pro Asn Asn Arg Ser Val Phe

485 490 495

Glu Trp Ala His Asp Lys Gly Leu Val Cys Gin Thr Asn He Thr Cys

500 505 510
Phe Leu Arg Asn Asp Asn Glu Gly Gin Asp Tyr Glu Val Asn Gin Thr

515 520 525
Leu Arg Glu Arg Gin Leu Tyr Thr Lys Asn Asp Ser Leu Thr Gly Thr

530 535 540
Asp Phe Gly Met Thr Asp Asp Gly Pro Ser Asp Ala Tyr He Gly His 545 550 555 560

Leu Asp Tyr Gly Gly Gly Val Glu Cys Asp Ala Leu Phe Pro Asp Trp

565 570 575

Gly Arg Pro Asp Val Ala Glu Trp Trp Gly Asn Asn Tyr Lys Lys Leu

580 585 590
Phe Ser He Gly Leu Asp Phe Val Trp Gin Asp Met Thr Val Pro Ala

595 600 605
Met Met Pro His Lys He Gly Asp Asp He Asn Val Lys Pro Asp Gly

610 615 620
Asn Trp Pro Asn Ala Asp Asp Pro Ser Asn Gly Gin Tyr Asn Trp Lys 625 630 635 640

Thr Tyr His Pro Gin Val Leu Val Thr Asp Met Arg Tyr Glu Asn His

645 650 655

Gly Arg Glu Pro Met Val Thr Gin Arg Asn He His Ala Tyr Thr Leu

660 665 670

Cys Glu Ser Thr Arg Lys Glu Gly He Val Glu Asn Ala Asp Thr Leu

675 680 685
Thr Lys Phe Arg Arg Ser Tyr lie He Ser Arg Gly Gly Tyr He Gly

690 695 700
Asn Gin His Phe Gly Gly Met Trp Val Gly Asp Asn Ser Thr Thr Ser 705 710 715 720

Asn Tyr He Gin Met Met He Ala Asn Asn He Asn Met Asn Met Ser

725 730 735

Cys Leu Pro Leu Val Gly Ser Asp He Gly Gly Phe Thr Ser Tyr Asp

740 745 v 750

Asn Glu Asn Gin Arg Thr Pro Cys Thr Gly Asp Leu Met Val Arg Tyr

755 760 765
Val Gin Ala Gly Cys Leu Leu Pro Trp Phe Arg Asn His Tyr Asp Arg

770 775 780
Trp He Glu Ser Lys Asp His Gly Lys Asp Tyr Gin Glu Leu Tyr Met 785 790 795 800

Tyr Pro Asn Glu Met Asp Thr Leu Arg Lys Phe Val Glu Phe Arg Tyr

805 810 815

Arg Trp Gin Glu Val Leu Tyr Thr Ala Met Tyr Gin Asn Ala Ala Phe

820 825 830

Gly Lys Pro He He Lys Ala Ala Ser Met Tyr Asn Asn Asp Ser Asn

835 840 845
Val Arg Arg Ala Gin Asn Asp His Phe Leu Leu Gly Gly His Asp Gly

850 855 860
Tyr Arg He Leu Cys Ala Pro Val Val Trp Glu Asn Ser Thr Glu Arg 865 870 875 880 Glu Leu Tyr Leu Pro Val Leu Thr Gin Trp Tyr Lys Phe Gly Pro Asp
885 890 895

Phe Asp Thr Lys Pro Leu Glu Gly Ala Met Asn Gly Gly Asp Arg He

900 905 910
Tyr Asn Tyr Pro Val Pro Gin Ser Glu Ser Pro He Phe Val Arg Glu

915 920 925
Gly Ala He Leu Pro Thr Arg Tyr Thr Leu Asn Gly Glu Asn Lys Ser

930 935 940
Leu Asn Thr Tyr Thr Asp Glu Asp Pro Leu Val Phe Glu Val Phe Pro 945 950 955 960

Leu Gly Asn Asn Arg Ala Asp Gly Met Cys Tyr Leu Asp Asp Gly Gly
965 970 975

Val Thr Thr Asn Ala Glu Asp Asn Gly Lys Phe Ser Val Val Lys Val

980 985 990
Ala Ala Glu Gin Asp Gly Gly Thr Glu Thr He Thr Phe Thr Asn Asp

995 1000 1005
Cys Tyr Glu Tyr Val Phe Gly Gly Pro Phe Tyr Val Arg Val Arg Gly

1010 1015 1020
Ala Gin Ser Pro Ser Asn He His Val Ser Ser Gly Ala Gly Ser Gin 1025 1030 1035 1040

Asp Met Lys Val Ser Ser Ala Thr Ser Arg Ala Ala Leu Phe Asn Asp
1045 1050 1055

Gly Glu Asn Gly Asp Phe Trp Val Asp Gin Glu Thr Asp Ser Leu Trp

1060 1065 1070

Leu Lys Leu Pro Asn Val Val Leu Pro Asp Ala Val He Thr He Thr 1075 1080 1085
(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO 2
(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS
(A) LENGTH 1091 amino acids
(B) TYPE amino acid
(D) TOPOLOGY linear
(n) MOLECULE TYPE protein
(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION SEQ ID NO 2
Met Tyr Pro Thr Leu Thr Phe Val Ala Pro Ser Ala Leu Gly Ala Arg 1 5 10 15

Thr Phe Thr Cys Val Gly He Phe Arg Ser His He Leu He His Ser
20 25 30
Val Val Pro Ala Val Arg Leu Ala Val Arg Lys Ser Asn Arg Leu Asn

35 40 45
Val Ser Met Ser Ala Leu Phe Asp Lys Pro Thr Ala Val Thr Gly Gly

50 55 60
Lys Asp Asn Pro Asp Asn He Asn Tyr Thr Thr Tyr Asp Tyr Val Pro 65 70 75 80

Val Trp Arg Phe Asp Pro Leu Ser Asn Thr Asn Trp Phe Ala Ala Gly
85 90 l 95

Ser Ser Thr Pro Gly Asp He Asp Asp Trp Thr Ala Thr Met Asn Val
100 105 110

Asn Phe Asp Arg He Asp Asn Pro Ser Phe Thr Leu Glu Lys Pro Val

115 120 125
Gin Val Gin Val Thr Ser Tyr Lys Asn Asn Cys Phe Arg Val Arg Phe

130 135 140
Asn Pro Asp Gly Pro He Arg Asp Val Asp Arg Gly Pro He Leu Gin 145 150 155 160

Gin Gin Leu Asn Trp He Arg Lys Gin Glu Gin Ser Lys Gly Phe Asp
165 170 175

Pro Lys Met Gly Phe Thr Lys Glu Gly Phe Leu Lys Phe Glu Thr Lys
180 185 190

Asp Leu Asn Val He He Tyr Gly Asn Phe Lys Thr Arg Val Thr Arg

195 200 205
Lys Arg Asp Gly Lys Gly He Met Glu Asn Asn Glu Val Pro Ala Gly 210 215 220 Ser Leu Gly^sn Lys Cys Arg Gly Leu Met Phe Val Asp Arg Leu Tyr 225 230 235 240 Gly Thr Ala He Ala Ser Val Asn Glu Asn Tyr Arg Asn Asp Pro Asp 245 250 255

Arg Lys Glu Gly Phe Tyr Gly Ala Gly Glu Val Asn Cys Glu Phe Trp 260 265 270
Asp Ser Glu Gin Asn Arg Asn Lys Tyr He Leu Glu Arg Thr Gly He 275 280 285
Ala Met Thr Asn Tyr Asn Tyr Asp Asn Tyr Asn Tyr Asn Gin Ser Asp 290 295 300
Leu He Ala Pro Gly Tyr Pro Ser Asp Pro Asn Phe Tyr He Pro Met 305 310 315 320 Tyr Phe Ala Ala Pro Trp Val Val Val Lys Gly Cys Ser Gly Asn Ser 325 330. 335

Asp Glu Gin Tyr Ser Tyr Gly Trp Phe Met Asp Asn Val Ser Gin Thr 340 345 350
Tyr Met Asn Thr Gly Gly Thr Ser Trp Asn Cys Gly Glu Glu Asn Leu 355 360 365
Ala Tyr Met Gly Ala Gin Cys Gly Pro Phe Asp Gin His Phe Val Tyr 370 375 380
Gly Asp Gly Asp Gly Leu Glu Asp Val Val Gin Ala Phe Ser Leu Leu 385 390 395 400 Gin Gly Lys Glu Phe Glu Asn Gin Val Leu Asn Lys Arg Ala Val Met 405 410 415

Pro Pro Lys Tyr Val Phe Gly Tyr Phe Gin Gly Val Phe Gly He Ala 420 425 430

Ser Leu Leu Arg Glu Gin Arg Pro Glu Gly Gly Asn Asn He Ser Val 435 440 445
Gin Glu He Val Glu Gly Tyr Gin Ser Asn Asn Phe Pro Leu Glu Gly 450 455 460
Leu Ala Val Asp Val Asp Met Gin Gin Asp Leu Arg Val Phe Thr Thr 465 470 475 480 Lys He Glu Phe Trp Thr Ala Asn Lys Val Gly Thr Gly Gly Asp Ser 485 490 495

Asn Asn Lys Ser Val Phe Glu Trp Ala His Asp Lys Gly Leu Val Cys 500 505 510

Gin Thr Asn Val Thr Cys Phe Leu Arg Asn Asp Asn Gly Gly Ala Asp 515 520 525
Tyr Glu Val Asn Gin Thr Leu Arg Glu Lys Gly Leu Tyr Thr Lys Asn 530 535 540
Asp Ser Leu Thr Asn Thr Asn Phe Gly Thr Thr Asn Asp Gly Pro Ser 545 550 555 560 Asp Ala Tyr He Gly His Leu Asp Tyr Gly Gly Gly Gly Asn Cys Asp 565 570 575

Ala Leu Phe Pro Asp Trp Gly Arg Pro Gly Val Ala Glu Trp Trp Gly 580 585 590

Asp Asn Tyr Ser Lys Leu Phe Lys He Gly Leu Asp Phe Val Trp Gin 595 600 605
Asp Met Thr Val Pro Ala Met Met Pro His Lys Val Gly Asp Ala Val 610 615 620
Asp Thr Arg Ser Pro Tyr Gly Trp Pro Asn Glu Asn Asp Pro Ser Asn 625 630 635 640 Gly Arg Tyr Asn Trp Lys Ser Tyr His Pro Gin Val Leu Val Thr Asp 645 650 655

Met Arg Tyr Glu Asn His Gly Arg Glu Pro Met Phe Thr Gin Arg Asn 660 665 670

Met His Ala Tyr Thr Leu Cys Glu Ser Thr Arg Lys Glu Gly He Val 675 680 685
Ala Asn Ala Asp Thr Leu Thr Lys Phe Arg Arg Ser Tyr He He Ser 690 695 700
Arg Gly Gly Tyr He Gly Asn Gin His Phe Gly Gly Met Trp Val Gly 705 710 715 720 Asp Asn Ser Ser Ser Gin Arg Tyr Leu Gin Met Met He Ala Asn He 725 730 735

Val Asn Met Asn Met Ser Cys Leu Pro Leu Val Gly Ser Asp He Gly 740 745 750 Gly Phe Thr-Ser Tyr Asp Gly Arg Asn Val Cys Pro Gly Asp Leu Met

755 760 765
Val Arg Phe Val Gin Ala Gly Cys Leu Leu Pro Trp Phe Arg Asn His

770 775 780
Tyr Gly Arg Leu Val Glu Gly Lys Gin Glu Gly Lys Tyr Tyr Gin Glu 785 790 795 800

Leu Tyr Met Tyr Lys Asp Glu Met Ala Thr Leu Arg Lys Phe He Glu
805 810 815

Phe Arg Tyr Arg Trp Gin Glu Val Leu Tyr Thr Ala Met Tyr Gin Asn

820 825 830
Ala Ala Phe Gly Lys Pro He He Lys Ala Ala Ser Met Tyr Asp Asn

835 840 845
Asp Arg Asn Val Arg Gly Ala Gin Asp Asp His Phe Leu Leu Gly Gly

850 855 860
His Asp Gly Tyr Arg He Leu Cys Ala Pro Val Val Trp Glu Asn Thr 865 870 875 880

Thr Ser Arg Asp Leu Tyr Leu Pro Val Leu Thr Lys Trp Tyr Lys Phe
885 890 895

Gly Pro Asp Tyr Asp Thr Lys Arg Leu Asp Ser Ala Leu Asp Gly Gly

900 905 910
Gin Met He Lys Asn Tyr Ser Val Pro Gin Ser Asp Ser Pro He Phe

915 920 925
Val Arg Glu Gly Ala He Leu Pro Thr Arg Tyr Thr Leu Asp Gly Ser

930 935 940
Asn Lys Ser Met Asn Thr Tyr Thr Asp Lys Asp Pro Leu Val Phe Glu 945 950 955 960

Val Phe Pro Leu Gly Asn Asn Arg Ala Asp Gly Met Cys Tyr Leu Asp
965 970 975

Asp Gly Gly He Thr Thr Asp Ala Glu Asp His Gly Lys Phe Ser Val

980 985 990
He Asn Val Glu Ala Leu Arg Lys Gly Val Thr Thr Thr He Lys Phe

995 1000 1005
Ala Tyr Asp Thr Tyr Gin Tyr Val Phe Asp Gly Pro Phe Tyr Val Arg

1010 1015 1020
He Arg Asn Leu Thr Thr Ala Ser Lys He Asn Val Ser Ser Gly Ala 1025 1030 1035 1040

Gly Glu Glu Asp Met Thr Pro Thr Ser Ala Asn Ser Arg Ala Ala Leu
1045 1050 1055

Phe Ser Asp Gly Gly Val Gly Glu Tyr Trp Ala Asp Asn Asp Thr Ser

1060 1065 1070

Ser Leu Trp Met Lys Leu Pro Asn Leu Val Leu Gin Asp Ala Val He

1075 1080 1085
Thr He Thr
1090
(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO 3
(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS
(A) LENGTH 1066 amino acids
(B) TYPE amino acid
(D) TOPOLOGY linear
(n) MOLECULE TYPE protein
(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION SEQ ID NO 3
Met Ala Gly Phe Ser Asp Pro Leu Asn Phe Cys Lys Ala Glu Asp Tyr 1 5 10 15

Tyr Ser Val Ala Leu Asp Trp Lys Gly Pro Gin Lys He He Gly Val
20 25 30
Asp Thr Thr Pro Pro Lys Ser Thr Lys Phe Pro Lys Asn Trp His Gly

35 40 45
Val Asn Leu Arg Phe Asp Asp Gly Thr Leu Gly Val Val Gin Phe He

50 55 60
Arg Pro Cys Val Trp Arg Val Arg Tyr Asp Pro Gly Phe Lys Thr Ser 65 70 75 80 Asp Glu Tyr-Gly Asp Glu Asn Thr Arg Thr He Val Gin Asp Tyr Met

85 90 95

Ser Thr Leu Ser Asn Lys Leu Asp Thr Tyr Arg Gly Leu Thr Trp Glu 100 105 110
Thr Lys Cys Glu Asp Ser Gly Asp Phe Phe Thr Phe Ser Ser Lys Val 115 120 125
Thr Ala Val Glu Lys Ser Glu Arg Thr Arg Asn Lys Val Gly Asp Gly

130 135 140
Leu Arg He His Leu Trp Lys Ser Pro Phe Arg He Gin Val Val Arg 145 150 155 160

Thr Leu Thr Pro Leu Lys Asp Pro Tyr Pro He Pro Asn Val Ala Ala

165 170 175

Ala Glu Ala Arg Val Ser Asp Lys Val Val Trp Gin Thr Ser Pro Lys

180 185 190
Thr Phe Arg Lys Asn Leu His Pro Gin His Lys Met Leu Lys Asp Thr

195 200 205
Val Leu Asp He Val Lys Pro Gly His Gly Glu Tyr Val Gly Trp Gly

210 215 220
Glu Met Gly Gly He Gin Phe Met Lys Glu Pro Thr Phe Met Asn Tyr 225 230 235 240

Phe Asn Phe Asp Asn Met Gin Tyr Gin Gin Val Tyr Ala Gin Gly Ala

245 250 255

Leu Asp Ser Arg Glu Pro Leu Tyr His Ser Asp Pro Phe Tyr Leu Asp

260 265 270
Val Asn Ser Asn Pro Glu His Lys Asn He Thr Ala Thr Phe He Asp

275 280 285
Asn Tyr Ser Gin He Ala He Asp Phe Gly Lys Thr Asn Ser Gly Tyr

290 295 300
He Lys Leu Gly Thr Arg Tyr Gly Gly He Asp Cys Tyr Gly He Ser 305 310 315 320

Ala Asp Thr Val Pro Glu He Val Arg Leu Tyr Thr Gly Leu Val Gly

325 330 335

Arg Ser Lys Leu Lys Pro Arg Tyr He Leu Gly Ala His Gin Ala Cys

340 345 350
Tyr Gly Tyr Gin Gin Glu Ser Asp Leu Tyr Ser Val Val Gin Gin Tyr

355 360 365
Arg Asp Cys Lys Phe Pro Leu Asp Gly He His Val Asp Val Asp Val

370 375 380
Gin Asp Gly Phe Arg Thr Phe Thr Thr Asn Pro His Thr Phe Pro Asn 385 390 395 400

Pro Lys Glu Met Phe Thr Asn Leu Arg Asn Asn Gly He Lys Cys Ser

405 410 415

Thr Asn He Thr Pro Val He Ser He Asn Asn Arg Glu Gly Gly Tyr

420 425 430
Ser Thr Leu Leu Glu Gly Val Asp Lys Lys Tyr Phe He Met Asp Asp

435 440 445
Arg Tyr Thr Glu Gly Thr Ser Gly Asn Ala Lys Asp Val Arg Tyr Met

450 455 460
Tyr Tyr Gly Gly Gly Asn Lys Val Glu Val Asp Pro Asn Asp Val Asn 465 470 475 v 480

Gly Arg Pro Asp Phe Lys Asp Asn Tyr Asp Phe Pro Ala Asn Phe Asn

485 490 495

Ser Lys Gin Tyr Pro Tyr His Gly Gly Val Ser Tyr Gly Tyr Gly Asn

500 505 510
Gly Ser Ala Gly Phe Tyr Pro Asp Leu Asn Arg Lys Glu Val Arg He

515 520 525
Trp Trp Gly Met Gin Tyr Lys Tyr Leu Phe Asp Met Gly Leu Glu Phe

530 535 540
Val Trp Gin Asp Met Thr Thr Pro Ala He His Thr Ser Tyr Gly Asp 545 550 555 560

Met Lys Gly Leu Pro Thr Arg Leu Leu Val Thr Ser Asp Ser Val Thr

565 570 575

Asn Ala Ser Glu Lys Lys Leu Ala He Glu Thr Trp Ala Leu Tyr Ser

580 585 590
Tyr Asn Leu His Lys Ala Thr Trp His Gly Leu Ser Arg Leu Glu Ser 595 600 605 Arg Lys As - Lys Arg Asn Phe He Leu Gly Arg Gly Ser Tyr Ala Gly

610 615 620
Ala Tyr Arg Phe Ala Gly Leu Trp Thr Gly Asp Asn Ala Ser Asn Trp

625 630 635 640

Glu Phe Trp Lys He Ser Val Ser Gin Val Leu Ser Leu Gly Leu Asn

645 650 655

Gly Val Cys He Ala Gly Ser Asp Thr Gly Gly Phe Glu Pro Tyr Arg 660 665 670
Asp Ala Asn Gly Val Glu Glu Lys Tyr Cys Ser Pro Glu Leu Leu He 675 680 685
Arg Trp Tyr Thr Gly Ser Phe Leu Leu Pro Trp Leu Arg Asn His Tyr

690 695 700
Val Lys Lys Asp Arg Lys Trp Phe Gin Glu Pro Tyr Ser Tyr Pro Lys

705 710 715 720

His Leu Glu Thr His Pro Glu Leu Ala Asp Gin Ala Trp Leu Tyr Lys

725 730 735

Ser Val Leu Glu He Cys Arg Tyr Tyr Val Glu Leu Arg Tyr Ser Leu 740 745 750
He Gin Leu Leu Tyr Asp Cys Met Phe Gin Asn Val Val Asp Gly Met 755 760 765
Pro He Thr Arg Ser Met Leu Leu Thr Asp Thr Glu Asp Thr Thr Phe 770 775 780
Phe Asn Glu Ser Gin Lys Phe Leu Asp Asn Gin Tyr Met Ala Gly Asp

785 790 795 800

Asp He Leu Val Ala Pro He Leu His Ser Arg Lys Glu He Pro Gly

805 810 815

Glu Asn Arg Asp Val Tyr Leu Pro Leu Tyr His Thr Trp Tyr Pro Ser 820 825 830
Asn Leu Arg Pro Trp Asp Asp Gin Gly Val Ala Leu Gly Asn Pro Val

835 840 845
Glu Gly Gly Ser Val He Asn Tyr Thr Ala Arg He Val Ala Pro Glu 850 855 860
Asp Tyr Asn Leu Phe His Ser Val Val Pro Val Tyr Val Arg Glu Gly

865 870 875 880

Ala He He Pro Gin He Glu Val Arg Gin Trp Thr Gly Gin Gly Gly

885 890 895

Ala Asn Arg He Lys Phe Asn He Tyr Pro Gly Lys Asp Lys Glu Tyr 900 905 910
Cys Thr Tyr Leu Asp Asp Gly Val Ser Arg Asp Ser Ala Pro Glu Asp 915 920 925
Leu Pro Gin Tyr Lys Glu Thr His Glu Gin Ser Lys Val Glu Gly Ala 930 935 940
Glu He Ala Lys Gin He Gly Lys Lys Thr Gly Tyr Asn He Ser Gly

945 950 955 960

Thr Asp Pro Glu Ala Lys Gly Tyr His Arg Lys Val Ala Val Thr Gin

965 970 975

Thr Ser Lys Asp Lys Thr Arg Thr Val Thr He Glu Pro Lys His Asn 980 985 990
Gly Tyr Asp Pro Ser Lys Glu Val Gly Asp Tyr Tyr Thr He He Leu 995 1000 1005
Trp Tyr Ala Pro Gly Phe Asp Gly Ser He Val Asp Val Ser Lys Thr

1010 1015 1020
Thr Val Asn Val Glu Gly Gly Val Glu His Gin Val Tyr Lys Asn Ser

1025 1030 1035 1040

Asp Leu His Thr Val Val He Asp Val Lys Glu Val He Gly Thr Thr

1045 1050 1055

Lys Ser Val Lys He Thr Cys Thr Ala Ala
1060 1065 (2) INFORMATION EOR SEQ ID NO 4
(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS'
(A) LENGTH 1070 amino acids
(B) TYPE amino acid
(D) TOPOLOGY linear
(n) MOLECULE TYPE protein
(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION SEQ ID NO 4
Met Ala Gly Leu Ser Asp Pro Leu Asn Phe Cys Lys Ala Glu Asp Tyr

1 5 10 15

Tyr Ala Ala Ala Lys Gly Trp Ser Gly Pro Gin Lys He He Arg Tyr

20 25 30
Asp Gin Thr Pro Pro Gin Gly Thr Lys Asp Pro Lys Ser Trp His Ala

35 40 45
Val Asn Leu Pro Phe Asp Asp Gly Thr Met Cys Val Val Gin Phe Val

50 55 60
Arg Pro Cys Val Trp Arg Val Arg Tyr Asp Pro Ser Val Lys Thr Ser 65 70 75 80

Asp Glu Tyr Gly Asp Glu Asn Thr Arg Thr He Val Gin Asp Tyr Met
85 90 95

Thr Thr Leu Val Gly Asn Leu Asp He Phe Arg Gly Leu Thr Trp Val
100 105 110
Ser Thr Leu Glu Asp Ser Gly Glu Tyr Tyr Thr Phe Lys Ser Glu Val 115 120 125
Thr Ala Val Asp Glu Thr Glu Arg Thr Arg Asn Lys Val Gly Asp Gly 130 135 140
Leu Lys He Tyr Leu Trp Lys Asn Pro Phe Arg He Gin Val Val Arg 145 150 155 160

Leu Leu Thr Pro Leu Val Asp Pro Phe Pro He Pro Asn Val Ala Asn
165 170 175

Ala Thr Ala Arg Val Ala Asp Lys Val Val Trp Gin Thr Ser Pro Lys
180 185 190

Thr Phe Arg Lys Asn Leu His Pro Gin His Lys Met Leu Lys Asp Thr

195 200 205
Val Leu Asp He He Lys Pro Gly His Gly Glu Tyr Val Gly Trp Gly

210 215 220
Glu Met Gly Gly He Glu Phe Met Lys Glu Pro Thr Phe Met Asn Tyr 225 230 235 240

Phe Asn Phe Asp Asn Met Gin Tyr Gin Gin Val Tyr Ala Gin Gly Ala
245 250 255

Leu Asp Ser Arg Glu Pro Leu Tyr His Ser Asp Pro Phe Tyr Leu Asp
260 265 270

Val Asn Ser Asn Pro Glu His Lys Asn He Thr Ala Thr Phe He Asp

275 280 285
Asn Tyr Ser Gin He Ala He Asp Phe Gly Lys Thr Asn Ser Gly Tyr

290 295 300
He Lys Leu Gly Thr Arg Tyr Gly Gly He Asp Cys Tyr Gly He Ser 305 310 315 320

Ala Asp Thr Val Pro Glu He Val Arg Leu Tyr Thr Gly Leu Val Gly
325 330 335

Arg Ser Lys Leu Lys Pro Arg Tyr He Leu Gly Ala His Gin Ala Cys
340 345 350

Tyr Gly Tyr Gin Gin Glu Ser Asp Leu His Ala Val Val Gin Gin Tyr

355 360 365
Arg Asp Thr Lys Phe Pro Leu Asp Gly Leu His Val Asp Val Asp Phe

370 375 380
Gin Asp Asn Phe Arg Thr Phe Thr Thr Asn Pro He Thr Phe Pro Asn 385 390 395 400

Pro Lys Glu Met Phe Thr Asn Leu Arg Asn Asn Gly He Lys Cys Ser
405 410 415

Thr Asn He Thr Pro Val He Ser He Arg Asp Arg Pro Asn Gly Tyr
420 425 430
Ser Thr Leu Asn Glu Gly Tyr Asp Lys Lys Tyr Phe He Met Asp Asp 435 440 445 Arg Tyr Thr.Glu Gly Thr Ser Gly Asp Pro Gin Asn Val Arg Tyr Ser

450 455 460
Phe Tyr Gly Gly Gly Asn Pro Val Glu Val Asn Pro Asn Asp Val Trp 465 470 475 480

Ala Arg Pro Asp Phe Gly Asp Asn Tyr Asp Phe Pro Thr Asn Phe Asn

485 490 495

Cys Lys Asp Tyr Pro Tyr His Gly Gly Val Ser Tyr Gly Tyr Gly Asn

500 505 510
Gly Thr Pro Gly Tyr Tyr Pro Asp Leu Asn Arg Glu Glu Val Arg He

515 ϊ 520 525
Trp Trp Gly Leu Gin Tyr Glu Tyr Leu Phe Asn Met Gly Leu Glu Phe

530 535 540
Val Trp Gin Asp Met Thr Thr Pro Ala He His Ser Ser Tyr Gly Asp 545 550 555 560

Met Lys Gly Leu Pro Thr Arg Leu Leu Val Thr Ala Asp Ser Val Thr 565 570 575

Asn Ala Ser Glu Lys Lys Leu Ala He Glu Ser Trp Ala Leu Tyr Ser 580 585 590
Tyr Asn Leu His Lys Ala Thr Phe His Gly Leu Gly Arg Leu Glu Ser

595 600 605
Arg Lys Asn Lys Arg Asn Phe He Leu Gly Arg Gly Ser Tyr Ala Gly

610 615 620
Ala Tyr Arg Phe Ala Gly Leu Trp Thr Gly Asp Asn Ala Ser Thr Trp 625 630 635 640

Glu Phe Trp Lys He Ser Val Ser Gin Val Leu Ser Leu Gly Leu Asn

645 650 655

Gly Val Cys He Ala Gly Ser Asp Thr Gly Gly Phe Glu Pro Ala Arg

660 665 670
Thr Glu He Gly Glu Glu Lys Tyr Cys Ser Pro Glu Leu Leu He Arg

675 680 685
Trp Tyr Thr Gly Ser Phe Leu Leu Pro Trp Leu Arg Asn His Tyr Val

690 695 700
Lys Lys Asp Arg Lys Trp Phe Gin Glu Pro Tyr Ala Tyr Pro Lys His 705 710 715 720

Leu Glu Thr His Pro Glu Leu Ala Asp Gin Ala Trp Leu Tyr Lys Ser

725 730 735

Val Leu Glu He Cys Arg Tyr Trp Val Glu Leu Arg Tyr Ser Leu He

740 745 750
Gin Leu Leu Tyr Asp Cys Met Phe Gin Asn Val Val Asp Gly Met Pro

755 760 765
Leu Ala Arg Ser Met Leu Leu Thr Asp Thr Glu Asp Thr Thr Phe Phe

770 775 780
Asn Glu Ser Gin Lys Phe Leu Asp Asn Gin Tyr Met Ala Gly Asp Asp 785 790 795 800

He Leu Val Ala Pro He Leu His Ser Arg Asn Glu Val Pro Gly Glu

805 810 815

Asn Arg Asp Val Tyr Leu Pro Leu Phe His Thr Trp Tyr Pro Ser Asn

820 825 830
Leu Arg Pro Trp Asp Asp Gin Gly Val Ala Leu Gly Asn Pro Val Glu

835 840 845
Gly Gly Ser Val He Asn Tyr Thr Ala Arg He Val Ala Pro Glu Asp

850 855 860
Tyr Asn Leu Phe His Asn Val Val Pro Val Tyr He Arg Glu Gly Ala 865 870 875 880

He He Pro Gin He Gin Val Arg Gin Trp He Gly Glu Gly Gly Pro

885 890 895

Asn Pro He Lys Phe Asn He Tyr Pro Gly Lys Asp Lys Glu Tyr Val

900 905 910
Thr Tyr Leu Asp Asp Gly Val Ser Arg Asp Ser Ala Pro Asp Asp Leu

915 920 925
Pro Gin Tyr Arg Glu Ala Tyr Glu Gin Ala Lys Val Glu Gly Lys Asp

930 935 940
Val Gin Lys Gin Leu Ala Val He Gin Gly Asn Lys Thr Asn Asp Phe 945 950 955 960

Ser Ala Ser Gly He Asp Lys Glu Ala Lys Gly Tyr His Arg Lys Val 965 970 975 Ser He Lys.Gin Glu Ser Lys Asp Lys Thr Arg Thr Val Thr He Glu

980 985 990
Pro Lys His Asn Gly Tyr Asp Pro Ser Lys Glu Val Gly Asn Tyr Tyr

995 1000 1005
Thr He He Leu Trp Tyr Ala Pro Gly Phe Asp Gly Ser He Val Asp

1010 1015 1020
Val Ser Gin Ala Thr Val Asn He Glu Gly Gly Val Glu Cys Glu He 1025 1030 1035 1040

Phe Lys Asn Thr Gly Leu His Thr Val Val Val Asn Val Lys Glu Val
1045 1050 1055

He Gly Thr Thr Lys Ser Val Lys He Thr Cys Thr Thr Ala
1060 1065 1070

SEQ. ID. NO. 5
SEQUENCE TYPE: ENZYME
MOLECULE TYPE: AMINO ACID
ORIGINAL SOURCE: ALGAL
SEQUENCE LENGTH: 1092 AMINO ACIDS
SEQUENCE:
5 10 15
1
1
1 Met Phe Pro Thr Leu Thr Phe He Ala Pro Ser Ala Leu Ala Ala

16 Ser Thr Phe Val Gly Ala Asp He Arg Ser Gly He Arg He Gin

31 Ser Ala Leu Pro Ala Val Arg Asn Ala Val Arg Arg Ser Lys His

46 Tyr Asn Val Ser Met Thr Ala Leu Ser Asp Lys Gin Thr Ala He

61 Ser He Gly Pro Asp Asn Pro Asp Gly He Asn Tyr Gin Asn Tyr

76 Asp Tyr He Pro Val Ala Gly Phe Thr Pro Leu Ser Asn Thr Asn

91 Trp Tyr Ala Ala Gly Ser Ser Thr Pro Gly Gly He Thr Asp Trp

106 Thr Ala Thr Met Asn Val Lys Phe Asp Arg He Asp Asn Pro Ser

121 Tyr Ser Asn Asn His Pro Val Gin He Gin Val Thr Ser Tyr Asn

136 Asn Asn Ser Phe Arg He Arg Phe Asn Pro Asp Gly Pro He Arg

151 Asp Val Ser Arg Gly Pro He Leu Lys Gin Gin Leu Thr Trp He

166 Arg Asn Gin Glu Leu Ala Gin Gly Cys Asn Pro Asn Met Ser Phe

181 Ser Pro Glu Gly Phe Leu Ser Phe Glu Thr Lys Asp Leu Asn Val

196 He He Tyr Gly Asn Cys Lys Met Arg Val Thr Lys Lys Asp Gly

211 Tyr Leu Val Met Glu Asn Asp Glu Cys Asn Ser Gin Ser Asp Gly

226 Asn Lys Cys Arg Gly Leu Met Tyr Val Asp Arg Leu Tyr Gly Asn

241 Ala He Ala Ser Val Gin Thr Asn Phe His Lys Asp Thr Ser Arg

256 Asn Glu Lys Phe Tyr Gly Ala Gly Glu Val Asn Cys Arg Tyr Glu

271 Glu Gin Gly Lys Ala Pro Thr Tyr Val Leu Glu Arg Ser Gly Leu

286 Ala Met Thr Asn Tyr Asn Tyr Asp Asn Leu Asn Tyr Asn Gin Pro

301 Asp Val Val Pro Pro Gly Tyr Pro Asp His Pro Asn Tyr Tyr He

316 Pro Met Tyr Tyr Ala Ala Pro Trp Leu Val Val Gin Gly Cys Ala

331 Gly Thr Ser Lys Gin Tyr Ser Tyr Gly Trp Phe Met Asp Asn Val

346 Ser Gin Ser Tyr Met Asn Thr Gly Asp Thr Ala Trp Asn Cys Gly

361 Gin Glu Asn Leu Ala Tyr Met Gly Ala Gin Tyr Gly Pro Phe Asp

376 Gin His Phe Val Tyr Gly Asp Gly Asp Gly Leu Glu Asp Val Val

391 Lys Ala Phe Ser Phe Leu Gin Gly Lys Glu Phe Glu Asp Lys Lys

406 Leu Asn Lys Arg Ser Val Met Pro Pro Lys Tyr Val Phe Gly Phe

421 Phe Gin Gly Val Phe Gly Ala Leu Ser Leu Leu Lys Gin Asn Leu

436 Pro Ala Gly Glu Asn Asn He Ser Val Gin Glu He Val Glu Gly

451 Tyr Gin Asp Asn Asp Tyr Pro Phe Glu Gly Leu Ala Val Asp Val

466 Asp Met Gin Asp Asp Leu Arg Val Phe Thr Thr Lys Pro Glu Tyr

481 Trp Ser Ala Asn Met Val Gly Glu Gly Gly Asp Pro Asn Asn Arg

496 Ser Val Phe Glu Trp Ala His Asp Arg Gly Leu Val Cys Gin Thr

511 Asn Val Thr Cys Phe Leu Arg Asn Asp Asn Ser Gly Lys Pro Tyr

526 Glu Val Asn Gin Thr Leu Arg Glu Lys Gin Leu Tyr Thr Lys Asn

541 Asp Ser Leu Asn Asn Thr Asp Phe Gly Thr Thr Ser Asp Gly Pro

556 Gly Asp Ala Tyr He Gly His Leu Asp Tyr Gly Gly Gly Val Glu

571 Cys Asp Ala He Phe Pro Asp Trp Gly Arg Pro Asp Val Ala Gin

586 Trp Trp Gly Glu Asn Tyr Lys Lys Leu Phe Ser He Gly Leu Asp

601 Phe Val Trp Gin Asp Met Thr Val Pro Ala Met Met Pro His Arg

616 Leu Gly Asp Ala Val Asn Lys Asn Ser Gly Ser Ser Ala Pro Gly

631 Trp Pro Asn Glu Asn Asp Pro Ser Asn Gly Arg Tyr Asn Trp Lys

646 Ser Tyr His Pro Gin Val Leu Val Thr Asp Met Arg Tyr Gly Ala

661 Glu Tyr Gly Arg Glu Pro Met Val Ser Gin Arg Asn He His Ala 676 Tyr Thr Leu Cys Glu Ser Thr Arg-Arg Glu Gly He Val Gly Asn

691 Ala Asp Ser Leu Thr Lys Phe Arg Arg Ser Tyr He He Ser Arg

706 Gly Gly Tyr He Gly Asn Gin His Phe Gly Gly Met Trp Val Gly

721 Asp Asn Ser Ala Thr Glu Ser Tyr Leu Gin Met Met Leu Ala Asn

736 He He Asn Met Asn Met Ser Cys Leu Pro Leu Val Gly Ser Asp

751 He Gly Gly Phe Thr Gin Tyr Asn Asp Ala Gly Asp Pro Thr Pro

766 Glu Asp Leu Met Val Arg Phe Val Gin Ala Gly Cys Leu Leu Pro

781 Trp Phe Arg Asn His Tyr Asp Arg Trp He Glu Ser Lys Lys His

796 Gly Lys Lys Tyr Gin Glu Leu Tyr Met Tyr Pro Gly Gin Lys Asp

811 Thr Leu Lys Lys Phe Val Glu Phe Arg Tyr Arg Trp Gin Glu Val

826 Leu Tyr Thr Ala Met Tyr Gin Asn Ala Thr Thr Gly Glu Pro He

841 He Lys Ala Ala Pro Met Tyr Asn Asn Asp Val Asn Val Tyr Lys

856 Ser Gin Asn Asp His Phe Leu Leu Gly Gly His Asp Gly Tyr Arg

871 He Leu Cys Ala Pro Val Val Arg Glu Asn Ala Thr Ser Arg Glu

886 Val Tyr Leu Pro Val Tyr Ser Lys Trp Phe Lys Phe Gly Pro Asp

901 Phe Asp Thr Lys Pro Leu Glu Asn Glu He Gin Gly Gly Gin Thr

916 Leu Tyr Asn Tyr Ala Ala Pro Leu Asn Asp Ser Pro He Phe Val

931 Arg Glu Gly Thr He Leu Pro Thr Arg Tyr Thr Leu Asp Gly Val

946 Asn Lys Ser He Asn Thr Tyr Thr Asp Asn Asp Pro Leu Val Phe

961 Glu Leu Phe Pro Leu Glu Asn Asn Gin Ala His Gly Leu Phe Tyr

976 His Asp Asp Gly Gly Val Thr Thr Asn Ala Glu Asp Phe Gly Lys

991 Tyr Ser Val He Ser Val Lys Ala Ala Gin Glu Gly Ser Gin Met

1006 Ser Val Lys Phe Asp Asn Glu Val Tyr Glu His Gin Trp Gly Ala

1021 Ser Phe Tyr Val Arg Val Arg Asn Met Gly Ala Pro Ser Asn He

1036 Asn Val Ser Ser Gin He Gly Gin Gin Asp Met Gin Gin Ser Ser

1051 Val Ser Ser Arg Ala Gin Met Phe Thr Ser Ala Asn Asp Gly Glu

1066 Tyr Trp Val Asp Gin Ser Thr Asn Ser Leu Trp Leu Lys Leu Pro

1081 Gly Ala Val He Gin Asp Ala Ala He Thr Val Arg
Number of amino acid residues. 1092
Amino acid composition (including the signal sequense).
64 Ala 14 Cys 18 His 33 Met 56 Thr

48 Arg 55 Gin 45 He 49 Phe 22 Trp

89 Asn 49 Glu 65 Leu 59 Pro 67 Tyr

73 Asp 94 Gly 46 Lys 73 Ser 73 Val

SEQ. ID. NO. 6
SEQUENCE TYPE: ENZYME
MOLECULE TYPE AMINO ACID ORIGINAL SOURCE ALGAL SEQUENCE LENGTH. 570 AMINO ACIDS
SEQUENCE- 5 10 15
I I I

I I I

1 Met Thr Asn Tyr Asn Tyr Asp Asn Leu Asn Tyr Asn Gin Pro Asp

16 Leu He Pro Pro Gly His Asp Ser Asp Pro Asp Tyr Tyr He Pro

31 Met Tyr Phe Ala Ala Pro Trp Val He Ala His Gly Tyr Arg Gly

46 Thr Ser Asp Gin Tyr Ser Tyr Gly Trp Phe Leu Asp Asn Val Ser

61 Gin Ser Tyr Thr Asn Thr Gly Asp Asp Ala Trp Ala Gly Gin Lys

76 Asp Leu Ala Tyr Met Gly Ala Gin Cys Gly Pro Phe Asp Gin His

91 Phe Val Tyr Glu Ala Gly Asp Gly Leu Glu Asp Val Val Thr Ala

106 Phe Ser Tyr Leu Gin Gly Lys Glu Tyr Glu Asn Gin Gly Leu Asn

121 He Arg Ser Ala Met Pro Pro Lys Tyr Val Phe Gly Phe Phe Gin

136 Gly Val Phe Gly Ala Thr Ser Leu Leu Arg Asp Asn Leu Pro Ala

151 Gly Glu Asn Asn Val Ser Leu Glu Glu He Val Glu Gly Tyr Gin

166 Asn Gin Asn Val Pro Phe Glu Gly Leu Ala Val Asp Val Asp Met

181 Gin Asp Asp Leu Arg Val Phe Thr Thr Arg Pro Ala Phe Trp Thr

196 Ala Asn Lys Val Gly Glu Gly Gly Asp Pro Asn Asn Lys Ser Val

211 Phe Glu Trp Ala His Asp Arg Gly Leu Val Cys Gin Thr Asn Val

226 Thr Cys Phe Leu Lys Asn Glu Lys Asn Pro Tyr Glu Val Asn Gin

241 Ser Leu Arg Glu Lys Gin Leu Tyr Thr Lys Ser Asp Ser Leu Asp

256 Asn He Asp Phe Gly Thr Thr Pro Asp Gly Pro Ser Asp Ala Tyr

271 He Gly H s Leu Asp Tyr Gly Gly Gly Val Glu Cys Asp Ala Leu

286 Phe Pro Asp Trp Gly Arg Pro Asp Val Ala Gin Trp Trp Gly Asp 301 Asn Tyr Lys Lys Leu Phe Ser H e Gly Leu Asp Phe Val Trp Gi n
316 Asp Met Thr Val Pro Ala Met Met Pro Hi s Arg Leu Gly Asp Pro
331 Val Gly Thr Asn Ser Gly Glu Thr Al a Pro Gly Trp Pro Asn Asp
346 Lys Asp Pro Ser Asn Gly Arg Tyr Asn Trp Lys Ser Tyr Hi s Pro
361 Gin Val Leu Val Thr Asp Met Arg Tyr Asp Asp Tyr Gly Arg Asp
376 Pro He Val Thr Gin Arg Asn Leu Hi s Al a Tyr Thr Leu Cys Gl u
391 Ser Thr Arg Arg Glu Gly He Val Gly Asn Al a Asp Ser Leu Thr
406 Lys Phe Arg Arg Ser Tyr He H e Ser Arg Gly Gly Tyr H e Gly
421 Asn Gin His Phe Gly Gly Met Trp Val Gly Asp Asn Ser Ser Thr
436 Glu Asp Tyr Leu Ala Met Met Val H e Asn Val H e Asn Met Asn
451 Met Ser Gly Val Pro Leu Val Gly Ser Asp He Gly Gly Phe Thr
466 Glu His Asp Lys Arg Asn Pro Cys Thr Pro Asp Leu Met Met Arg
481 Phe Val Gin Ala Gly Cys Leu Leu Pro Trp Phe Arg Asn Hi s Tyr
496 Asp Arg Trp He Glu Ser Lys Lys Hi s Gly Lys Asn Tyr Gi n Gl u
511 Leu Tyr Met Tyr Arg Asp His Leu Asp Al a Leu Arg Ser Phe Val
526 Glu Leu Arg Tyr Arg Trp Gin Gl u Val Leu Tyr Thr Al a Met Tyr
541 Gin Asn Ala Leu Asn Gly Lys Pro H e H e Lys Thr Val Ser Met
556 Tyr Asn Asn Asp Met Asn Val Lys Asp Al a Gi n Asn Asp H s Phe
(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO. 7.
(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS.
(A) LENGTH: 3267 base pairs
(B) TYPE: nucleic acid
(C) STRANDEDNESS: double
(D) TOPOLOGY: linear
(n) MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (genomic)
(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION: SEQ ID NO: 7:
ATGTTTTCAA CCCTTGCGTT TGTCGCACCT AGTGCGCTGG GAGCCAGTAC CTTCGTAGGG 60

GCGGAGGTCA GGTCAAATGT TCGTATCCAT TCCGCTTTTC CAGCTGTGCA CACAGCTACT 120

CGCAAAACCA ATCGCCTCAA TGTATCCATG ACCGCATTGT CCGACAAACA AACGGCTACT 180

GCGGGTAGTA CAGACAATCC GGACGGTATC GACTACAAGA CCTACGATTA CGTCGGAGTA 240

TGGGGTTTCA GCCCCCTCTC CAACACGAAC TGGTTTGCTG CCGGCTCTTC TACCCCGGGT 300

GGCATCACTG ATTGGACGGC TACAATGAAT GTCAACTTCG ACCGTATCGA CAATCCGTCC 360

ATCACTGTCC AGCATCCCGT TCAGGTTCAG GTCACGTCAT ACAACAACAA CAGCTACAGG 420

GTTCGCTTCA ACCCTGATGG CCCTATTCGT GATGTGACTC GTGGGCCTAT CCTCAAGCAG 480

CAACTAGATT GGATTCGAAC GCAGGAGCTG TCAGAGGGAT GTGATCCCGG AATGACTTTC 540

ACATCAGAAG GTTTCTTGAC TTTTGAGACC AAGGATCTAA GCGTCATCAT CTACGGAAAT 600

TTCAAGACCA GAGTTACGAG AAAGTCTGAC GGCAAGGTCA TCATGGAAAA TGATGAAGTT 660

GGAACTGCAT CGTCCGGGAA CAAGTGCCGG GGATTGATGT TCGTTGATAG ATTATACGGT 720

AACGCTATCG CTTCCGTCAA CAAGAACTTC CGCAACGACG CGGTCAAGCA GGAGGGATTC 780

TATGGTGCAG GTGAAGTCAA CTGTAAGTAC CAGGACACCT ACATCTTAGA ACGCACTGGA 840

ATCGCCATGA CAAATTACAA CTACGATAAC TTGAACTATA ACCAGTGGGA CCTTAGACCT 900

CCGCATCATG ATGGTGCCCT CAACCCAGAC TATTATATTC CAATGTACTA CGCAGCACCT 960

TGGTTGATCG TTAATGGATG CGCCGGTACT TCGGAGCAGT ACTCGTATGG ATGGTTCATG 1020

GACAATGTCT CTCAATCTTA CATGAATACT GGAGATACTA CCTGGAATTC TGGACAAGAG 1080

GACCTGGCAT ACATGGGCGC GCAGTATGGA CCATTTGACC AACATTTTGP TTACGGTGCT 1140

GGGGGTGGGA TGGAATGTGT GGTCACAGCG TTCTCTCTTC TACAAGGCAA GGAGTTCGAG 1200

AACCAAGTTC TCAACAAACG TTCAGTAATG CCTCCGAAAT ACGTCTTTGG TTTCTTCCAG 1260

GGTGTTTTCG GGACTTCTTC CTTGTTGAGA GCGCATATGC CAGCAGGTGA GAACAACATC 1320

TCAGTCGAAG AAATTGTAGA AGGTTATCAA AACAACAATT TCCCTTTCGA GGGGCTCGCT 1380

GTGGACGTGG ATATGCAAGA CAACTTGCGG GTGTTCACCA CGAAGGGCGA ATTTTGGACC 1440

GCAAACAGGG TGGGTACTGG CGGGGATCCA AACAACCGAT CGGTTTTTGA ATGGGCACAT 1500

GACAAAGGCC TTGTTTGTCA GACAAATATA ACTTGCTTCC TGAGGAATGA TAACGAGGGG 1560

CAAGACTACG AGGTCAATCA GACGTTAAGG GAGAGGCAGT TGTACACGAA GAACGACTCC 1620

CTGACGGGTA CGGATTTTGG AATGACCGAC GACGGCCCCA GCGATGCGTA CATCGGTCAT 1680

CTGGACTATG GGGGTGGAGT AGAATGTGAT GCACTTTTCC CAGACTGGGG ACGGCCTGAC 1740

GTGGCCGAAT GGTGGGGAAA TAACTATAAG AAACTGTTCA GCATTGGTCT CGACTTCGTC 1800

TGGCAAGACA TGACTGTTCC AGCAATGATG CCGCACAAAA TTGGCGATGA CATCAATGTG 1860

AAACCGGATG GGAATTGGCC GAATGCGGAC GATCCGTCCA ATGGACAATA CAACTGGAAG 1920

ACGTACCATC CCCAAGTGCT TGTAACTGAT ATGCGTTATG AGAATCATGG TCGGGAACCG 1980

ATGGTCACTC AACGCAACAT TCATGCGTAT ACACTGTGCG AGTCTACTAG GAAGGAAGGG 2040

ATCGTGGAAA ACGCAGACAC TCTAACGAAG TTCCGCCGTA GCTACATTAT CAGTCGTGGT 2100

GGTTACATTG GTAACCAGCA TTTCGGGGGT ATGTGGGTGG GAGACAACTC TACTACATCA 2160 AACTACATCC AAATGATGAT TGCCAACAAT ATTAACATGA ATATGTCTTG CTTGCCTCTC 2220

GTCGGCTCCG ACATTGGAGG ATTCACCTCA TACGACAATG AGAATCAGCG AACGCCGTGT 2280

ACCGGGGACT TGATGGTGAG GTATGTGCAG GCGGGCTGCC TGTTGCCGTG GTTCAGGAAC 2340

CACTATGATA GGTGGATCGA GTCCAAGGAC CACGGAAAGG ACTACCAGGA GCTGTACATG 2400

TATCCGAATG AAATGGATAC GTTGAGGAAG TTCGTTGAAT TCCGTTATCG CTGGCAGGAA 2460

GTGTTGTACA CGGCCATGTA CCAGAATGCG GCTTTCGGAA AGCCGATTAT CAAGGCTGCT 2520

TCGATGTACA ATAACGACTC AAACGTTCGC AGGGCGCAGA ACGATCATTT CCTTCTTGGT 2580

GGACATGATG GATATCGCAT TCTGTGCGCG CCTGTTGTGT GGGAGAATTC GACCGAACGC 2640

GAATTGTACT TGCCCGTGCT GACCCAATGG TACAAATTCG GTCCCGACTT TGACACCAAG 2700

CCTCTGGAAG GAGCGATGAA CGGAGGGGAC CGAATTTACA ACTACCCTGT ACCGCAAAGT 2760

GAATCACCAA TCTTCGTGAG AGAAGGTGCG ATTCTCCCTA CCCGCTACAC GTTGAACGGT 2820

GAAAACAAAT CATTGAACAC GTACACGGAC GAAGATCCGT TGGTGTTTGA AGTATTCCCC 2880

CTCGGAAACA ACCGTGCCGA CGGTATGTGT TATCTTGATG ATGGCGGTGT GACCACCAAT 2940

GCTGAAGACA ATGGCAAGTT CTCTGTCGTC AAGGTGGCAG CGGAGCAGGA TGGTGGTACG 3000

GAGACGATAA CGTTTACGAA TGATTGCTAT GAGTACGTTT TCGGTGGACC GTTCTACGTT 3060

CGAGTGCGCG GCGCTCAGTC GCCGTCGAAC ATCCACGTGT CTTCTGGAGC GGGTTCTCAG 3120

GACATGAAGG TGAGCTCTGC CACTTCCAGG GCTGCGCTGT TCAATGACGG GGAGAACGGT 3180

GATTTCTGGG TTGACCAGGA GACAGATTCT CTGTGGCTGA AGTTGCCCAA CGTTGTTCTC 3240

CCGGACGCTG TGATCACAAT TACCTAA 3267

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO 8
(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS
(A) LENGTH 3276 base pairs
(B) TYPE nucleic acid
(C) STRANDEDNESS double
(D) TOPOLOGY linear
(n) MOLECULE TYPE- DNA (genomic)

(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION. SEQ ID NO: 8- ATGTATCCAA CCCTCACCTT CGTGGCGCCT AGTGCGCTAG GGGCCAGAAC TTTCACGTGT 60

GTGGGCATTT TTAGGTCACA CATTCTTATT CATTCGGTTG TTCCAGCGGT GCGTCTAGCT 120

GTGCGCAAAA GCAACCGCCT CAATGTATCC ATGTCCGCTT TGTTCGACAA ACCGACTGCT 180

GTTACTGGAG GGAAGGACAA CCCGGACAAT ATCAATTACA CCACTTATGA CTACGTCCCT 240

GTGTGGCGCT TCGACCCCCT CAGCAATACG AACTGGTTTG CTGCCGGATC TTCCACTCCC 300

GGCGATATTG ACGACTGGAC GGCGACAATG AATGTGAACT TCGACCGTAT CGACAATCCA 360

TCCTTCACTC TCGAGAAACC GGTTCAGGTT CAGGTCACGT CATACAAGAA CAATTGTTTC 420

AGGGTTCGCT TCAACCCTGA TGGTCCTATT CGCGATGTGG ATCGTGGGCC TATCCTCCAG 480

CAGCAACTAA ATTGGATCCG GAAGCAGGAG CAGTCGAAGG GGTTTGATCC TAAGATGGGC 540

TTCACAAAAG AAGGTTTCTT GAAATTTGAG ACCAAGGATC TGAACGTTAT CATATATGGC 600

AATTTTAAGA CTAGAGTTAC GAGGAAGAGG GATGGAAAAG GGATCATGGA GAATAATGAA 660

GTGCCGGCAG GATCGTTAGG GAACAAGTGC CGGGGATTGA TGTTTGTCGA CAGGTTGTAC 720

GGCACTGCCA TCGCTTCCGT TAATGAAAAT TACCGCAACG ATCCCGACAG GAAAGAGGGG 780

TTCTATGGTG CAGGAGAAGT AAACTGCGAG TTTTGGGACT CCGAACAAAA CAGGAACAAG 840

TACATCTTAG AACGAACTGG AATCGCCATG ACAAATTACA ATTATGACAA CTATAACTAC 900

AACCAGTCAG ATCTTATTGC TCCAGGATAT CCTTCCGACC CGAACTTCTA CATTCCCATG 960

TATTTTGCAG CACCTTGGGT AGTTGTTAAG GGATGCAGTG GCAACAGCGA1 TGAACAGTAC 1020

TCGTACGGAT GGTTTATGGA TAATGTCTCC CAAACTTACA TGAATACTGG TGGTACTTCC 1080

TGGAACTGTG GAGAGGAGAA CTTGGCATAC ATGGGAGCAC AGTGCGGTCC ATTTGACCAA 1140

CATTTTGTGT ATGGTGATGG AGATGGTCTT GAGGATGTTG TCCAAGCGTT CTCTCTTCTG 1200

CAAGGCAAAG AGTTTGAGAA CCAAGTTCTG AACAAACGTG CCGTAATGCC TCCGAAATAT 1260

GTGTTTGGTT ACTTTCAGGG AGTCTTTGGG ATTGCTTCCT TGTTGAGAGA GCAAAGACCA 1320

GAGGGTGGTA ATAACATCTC TGTTCAAGAG ATTGTCGAAG GTTACCAAAG CAATAACTTC 1380

CCTTTAGAGG GGTTAGCCGT AGATGTGGAT ATGCAACAAG ATTTGCGCGT GTTCACCACG 1440

AAGATTGAAT TTTGGACGGC AAATAAGGTA GGCACCGGGG GAGACTCGAA TAACAAGTCG 1500

GTGTTTGAAT GGGCACATGA CAAAGGCCTT GTATGTCAGA CGAATGTTAC TTGCTTCTTG 1560

AGAAACGACA ACGGCGGGGC AGATTACGAA GTCAATCAGA CATTGAGGGA GAAGGGTTTG 1620

TACACGAAGA ATGACTCACT GACGAACACT AACTTCGGAA CTACCAACGA CGGGCCGAGC 1680

GATGCGTACA TTGGACATCT GGACTATGGT GGCGGAGGGA ATTGTGATGC ACTTTTCCCA 1740

GACTGGGGTC GACCGGGTGT GGCTGAATGG TGGGGTGATA ACTACAGCAA GCTCTTCAAA 1800

ATTGGTCTGG ATTTCGTCTG GCAAGACATG ACAGTTCCAG CTATGATGCC ACACAAAGTT 1860

GGCGACGCAG TCGATACGAG ATCACCTTAC GGCTGGCCGA ATGAGAATGA TCCTTCGAAC 1920

GGACGATACA ATTGGAAATC TTACCATCCA CAAGTTCTCG TAACTGATAT GCGATATGAG 1980

AATCATGGAA GGGAACCGAT GTTCACTCAA CGCAATATGC ATGCGTACAC ACTCTGTGAA 2040 TCTACGAGGA AGGAAGGGAT TGTTGCAAAT GCAGACACTC TAACGAAGTT CCGCCGCAGT 2100 TATATTATCA GTCGTGGAGG TTACATTGGC AACCAGCATT TTGGAGGAAT GTGGGTTGGA 2160 GACAACTCTT CCTCCCAAAG ATACCTCCAA ATGATGATCG CGAACATCGT CAACATGAAC 2220 ATGTCTTGCC TTCCACTAGT TGGGTCCGAC ATTGGAGGTT TTACTTCGTA TGATGGACGA 2280 AACGTGTGTC CCGGGGATCT AATGGTAAGA TTCGTGCAGG CGGGTTGCTT ACTACCGTGG 2340 TTCAGAAACC ACTATGGTAG GTTGGTCGAG GGCAAGCAAG AGGGAAAATA CTATCAAGAA 2400 CTGTACATGT ACAAGGACGA GATGGCTACA TTGAGAAAAT TCATTGAATT CCGTTACCGC 2460 TGGCAGGAGG TGTTGTACAC TGCTATGTAC CAGAATGCGG CTTTCGGGAA ACCGATTATC 2520 AAGGCAGCTT CCATGTACGA CAACGACAGA AACGTTCGCG GCGCACAGGA TGACCACTTC 2580 CTTCTCGGCG GACACGATGG ATATCGTATT TTGTGTGCAC CTGTTGTGTG GGAGAATACA 2640 ACCAGTCGCG ATCTGTACTT GCCTGTGCTG ACCAAATGGT ACAAATTCGG CCCTGACTAT 2700 GACACCAAGC GCCTGGATTC TGCGTTGGAT GGAGGGCAGA TGATTAAGAA CTATTCTGTG 2760 CCACAAAGCG ACTCTCCGAT ATTTGTGAGG GAAGGAGCTA TTCTCCCTAC CCGCTACACG 2820 TTGGACGGTT CGAACAAGTC AATGAACACG TACACAGACA AAGACCCGTT GGTGTTTGAG GTATTCCCTC TTGGAAACAA CCGTGCCGAC GGTATGTGTT ATCTTGATGA TGGCGGTATT 2940 ACTACAGATG CTGAGGACCA TGGCAAATTC TCTGTTATCA ATGTCGAAGC CTTACGGAAA 3000 GGTGTTACGA CGACGATCAA GTTTGCGTAT GACACTTATC AATACGTATT TGATGGTCCA 3060 TTCTACGTTC GAATCCGTAA TCTTACGACT GCATCAAAAA TTAACGTGTC TTCTGGAGCG 3120 GGTGAAGAGG ACATGACACC GACCTCTGCG AACTCGAGGG CAGCTTTGTT CAGTGATGGA 3180 GGTGTTGGAG AATACTGGGC TGACAATGAT ACGTCTTCTC TGTGGATGAA GTTGCCAAAC 3240 CTGGTTCTGC AAGACGCTGT GATTACCATT ACGTAG 3276

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO 9
(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS
(A) LENGTH 3201 base pairs
(B) TYPE nucleic acid
(C) STRANDEDNESS double
(D) TOPOLOGY linear
(n) MOLECULE TYPE DNA (genomic)
(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION SEQ ID
ATGGCAGGAT TTTCTGATCC TCTCAACTTT TGCAAAGCAG AAGACTACTA CAGTGTTGCG 60 CTAGACTGGA AGGGCCCTCA AAAAATCATT GGAGTAGACA CTACTCCTCC AAAGAGCACC 120 AAGTTCCCCA AAAACTGGCA TGGAGTGAAC TTGAGATTCG ATGATGGGAC TTTAGGTGTG 180 GTTCAGTTCA TTAGGCCGTG CGTTTGGAGG GTTAGATACG ACCCTGGTTT CAAGACCTCT 240 GACGAGTATG GTGATGAGAA TACGAGGACA ATTGTGCAAG ATTATATGAG TACTCTGAGT 300 AATAAATTGG ATACTTATAG AGGTCTTACG TGGGAAACCA AGTGTGAGGA TTCGGGAGAT 360 TTCTTTACCT TCTCATCCAA GGTCACCGCC GTTGAAAAAT CCGAGCGGAC CCGCAACAAG 420 GTCGGCGATG GCCTCAGAAT TCACCTATGG AAAAGCCCTT TCCGCATCCA AGTAGTGCGC 480 ACCTTGACCC CTTTGAAGGA TCCTTACCCC ATTCCAAATG TAGCCGCAGC CGAAGCCCGT 540 GTGTCCGACA AGGTCGTTTG GCAAACGTCT CCCAAGACAT TCAGAAAGAA CCTGCATCCG 600 CAACACAAGA TGCTAAAGGA TACAGTTCTT GACATTGTCA AACCTGGACA TGGCGAGTAT 660 GTGGGGTGGG GAGAGATGGG AGGTATCCAG TTTATGAAGG AGCCAACATT CATGAACTAT 720 TTTAACTTCG ACAATATGCA ATACCAGCAA GTCTATGCCC AAGGTGCTCT CGATTCTCGC 780 GAGCCACTGT ACCACTCGGA TCCCTTCTAT CTTGATGTGA ACTCCAACCC GGAGCACAAG AATATCACGG CAACCTTTAT CGATAACTAC TCTCAAATTG CCATCGACTT TGGAAAGACC 900 AACTCAGGCT ACATCAAGCT GGGAACCAGG TATGGTGGTA TCGATTGTTA1 CGGTATCAGT 960 GCGGATACGG TCCCGGAAAT TGTACGACTT TATACAGGTC TTGTTGGACG TTCAAAGTTG 1020 AAGCCCAGAT ATATTCTCGG GGCCCATCAA GCCTGTTATG GATACCAACA GGAAAGTGAC 1080 TTGTATTCTG TGGTCCAGCA GTACCGTGAC TGTAAATTTC CACTTGACGG GATTCACGTC 1140 GATGTCGATG TTCAGGACGG CTTCAGAACT TTCACCACCA ACCCACACAC TTTCCCTAAC 1200 CCCAAAGAGA TGTTTACTAA CTTGAGGAAT AATGGAATCA AGTGCTCCAC CAATATCACT 1260 CCTGTTATCA GCATTAACAA CAGAGAGGGT GGATACAGTA CCCTCCTTGA GGGAGTTGAC 1320 AAAAAATACT TTATCATGGA CGACAGATAT ACCGAGGGAA CAAGTGGGAA TGCGAAGGAT 1380 GTTCGGTACA TGTACTACGG TGGTGGTAAT AAGGTTGAGG TCGATCCTAA TGATGTTAAT 1440 GGTCGGCCAG ACTTTAAAGA CAACTATGAC TTCCCCGCGA ACTTCAACAG CAAACAATAC 1500 CCCTATCATG GTGGTGTGAG CTACGGTTAT GGGAACGGTA GTGCAGGTTT TTACCCGGAC 1560 CTCAACAGAA AGGAGGTTCG TATCTGGTGG GGAATGCAGT ACAAGTATCT CTTCGATATG 1620 GGACTGGAAT TTGTGTGGCA AGACATGACT ACCCCAGCAA TCCACACATC ATATGGAGAC 1680 ATGAAAGGGT TGCCCACCCG TCTACTCGTC ACCTCAGACT CCGTCACCAA TGCCTCTGAG 1740 AAAAAGCTCG CAATTGAAAC TTGGGCTCTC TACTCCTACA ATCTCCACAA AGCAACTTGG 1800 CATGGTCTTA GTCGTCTCGA ATCTCGTAAG AACAAACGAA ACTTCATCCT CGGGCGTGGA 1860 AGTTATGCCG GAGCCTATCG TTTTGCTGGT CTCTGGACTG GGGATAATGC AAGTAACTGG 1920 GAATTCTGGA AGATATCGGT CTCTCAAGTT CTTTCTCTGG GCCTCAATGG TGTGTGCATC 1980 GCGGGGTCTG ATACGGGTGG TTTTGAACCC TACCGTGATG CAAATGGGGT CGAGGAGAAA 2040

TACTGTAGCC CAGAGCTACT CATCAGGTGG TATACTGGTT CATTCCTCTT GCCGTGGCTC 2100

AGGAACCATT ATGTCAAAAA GGACAGGAAA TGGTTCCAGG AACCATACTC GTACCCCAAG 2160

CATCTTGAAA CCCATCCAGA ACTCGCAGAC CAAGCATGGC TCTATAAATC CGTTTTGGAG 2220

ATCTGTAGGT ACTATGTGGA GCTTAGATAC TCCCTCATCC AACTACTTTA CGACTGCATG 2280

TTTCAAAACG TAGTCGACGG TATGCCAATC ACCAGATCTA TGCTCTTGAC CGATACTGAG 2340

GATACCACCT TCTTCAACGA GAGCCAAAAG TTCCTCGACA ACCAATATAT GGCTGGTGAC 2400

GACATTCTTG TTGCACCCAT CCTCCACAGT CGCAAAGAAA TTCCAGGCGA AAACAGAGAT 2460

GTCTATCTCC CTCTTTACCA CACCTGGTAC CCCTCAAATT TGAGACCATG GGACGATCAA 2520

GGAGTCGCTT TGGGGAATCC TGTCGAAGGT GGTAGTGTCA TCAATTATAC TGCTAGGATT 2580

GTTGCACCCG AGGATTATAA TCTCTTCCAC AGCGTGGTAC CAGTCTACGT TAGAGAGGGT 2640

GCCATCATCC CGCAAATCGA AGTACGCCAA TGGACTGGCC AGGGGGGAGC CAACCGCATC 2700

AAGTTCAACA TCTACCCTGG AAAGGATAAG GAGTACTGTA CCTATCTTGA TGATGGTGTT 2760

AGCCGTGATA GTGCGCCGGA AGACCTCCCA CAGTACAAAG AGACCCACGA ACAGTCGAAG 2820

GTTGAAGGCG CGGAAATCGC AAAGCAGATT GGAAAGAAGA CGGGTTACAA CATCTCAGGA 2880

ACCGACCCAG AAGCAAAGGG TTATCACCGC AAAGTTGCTG TCACACAAAC GTCAAAAGAC 2940

AAGACGCGTA CTGTCACTAT TGAGCCAAAA CACAATGGAT ACGACCCTTC CAAAGAGGTG 3000

GGTGATTATT ATACCATCAT TCTTTGGTAC GCACCAGGTT TCGATGGCAG CATCGTCGAT 3060

GTGAGCAAGA CGACTGTGAA TGTTGAGGGT GGGGTGGAGC ACCAAGTTTA TAAGAACTCC 3120

GATTTACATA CGGTTGTTAT CGACGTGAAG GAGGTGATCG GTACCACAAA GAGCGTCAAG 3180

ATCACATGTA CTGCCGCTTA A 3201

(2) INFORMATION FOR SEQ ID NO 10
(i) SEQUENCE CHARACTERISTICS
(A) LENGTH 3213 base pairs
(B) TYPE nucleic acid
(C) STRANDEDNESS double
(D) TOPOLOGY linear
(n) MOLECULE TYPE DNA (genomic)
(xi) SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION SEQ ID NO 10
ATGGCAGGAT TATCCGACCC TCTCAATTTC TGCAAAGCAG AGGACTACTA CGCTGCTGCC 60

AAAGGCTGGA GTGGCCCTCA GAAGATCATT CGCTATGACC AGACCCCTCC TCAGGGTACA 120

AAAGATCCGA AAAGCTGGCA TGCGGTAAAC CTTCCTTTCG ATGACGGGAC TATGTGTGTA 180

GTGCAATTCG TCAGACCCTG TGTTTGGAGG GTTAGATATG ACCCCAGTGT CAAGACTTCT 240

GATGAGTACG GCGATGAGAA TACGAGGACT ATTGTACAAG ACTACATGAC TACTCTGGTT 300

GGAAACTTGG ACATTTTCAG AGGTCTTACG TGGGTTTCTA CGTTGGAGGA TTCGGGCGAG 360

TACTACACCT TCAAGTCCGA AGTCACTGCC GTGGACGAAA CCGAACGGAC TCGAAACAAG 420

GTCGGCGACG GCCTCAAGAT TTACCTATGG AAAAATCCCT TTCGCATCCA GGTAGTGCGT 480

CTCTTGACCC CCCTGGTGGA CCCTTTCCCC ATTCCCAACG TAGCCAATGC CACAGCCCGT 540

GTGGCCGACA AGGTTGTTTG GCAGACGTCC CCGAAGACGT TCAGGAAAAA CTTGCATCCG 600

CAGCATAAGA TGTTGAAGGA TACAGTTCTT GATATTATCA AGCCGGGGCA CGGAGAGTAT 660

GTGGGTTGGG GAGAGATGGG AGGCATCGAG TTTATGAAGG AGCCAACATT CATGAATTAT 720

TTCAACTTTG ACAATATGCA ATATCAGCAG GTCTATGCAC AAGGCGCTCT TGATAGTCGT 780

GAGCCGTTGT ATCACTCTGA TCCCTTCTAT CTCGACGTGA ACTCCAACCC AGAGCACAAG 840

AACATTACGG CAACCTTTAT CGATAACTAC TCTCAGATTG CCATCGACTT TGGGAAGACC 900

AACTCAGGCT ACATCAAGCT GGGTACCAGG TATGGCGGTA TCGATTGTTA1 CGGTATCAGC 960

GCGGATACGG TCCCGGAGAT TGTGCGACTT TATACTGGAC TTGTTGGGCG TTCGAAGTTG 1020

AAGCCCAGGT ATATTCTCGG AGCCCACCAA GCTTGTTATG GATACCAGCA GGAAAGTGAC 1080

TTGCATGCTG TTGTTCAGCA GTACCGTGAC ACCAAGTTTC CGCTTGATGG GTTGCATGTC 1140

GATGTCGACT TTCAGGACAA TTTCAGAACG TTTACCACTA ACCCGATTAC GTTCCCTAAT 1200

CCCAAAGAAA TGTTTACCAA TCTAAGGAAC AATGGAATCA AGTGTTCCAC CAACATCACC 1260

CCTGTTATCA GTATCAGAGA TCGCCCGAAT GGGTACAGTA CCCTCAATGA GGGATATGAT 1320

AAAAAGTACT TCATCATGGA TGACAGATAT ACCGAGGGGA CAAGTGGGGA CCCGCAAAAT 1380

GTTCGATACT CTTTTTACGG CGGTGGGAAC CCGGTTGAGG TTAACCCTAA TGATGTTTGG 1440

GCTCGGCCAG ACTTTGGAGA CAATTATGAC TTCCCTACGA ACTTCAACTG CAAAGACTAC 1500

CCCTATCATG GTGGTGTGAG TTACGGATAT GGGAATGGCA CTCCAGGTTA CTACCCTGAC 1560

CTTAACAGAG AGGAGGTTCG TATCTGGTGG GGATTGCAGT ACGAGTATCT CTTCAATATG 1620

GGACTAGAGT TTGTATGGCA AGATATGACA ACCCCAGCGA TCCATTCATC ATATGGAGAC 1680

ATGAAAGGGT TGCCCACCCG TCTGCTCGTC ACCGCCGACT CAGTTACCAA TGCCTCTGAG 1740

AAAAAGCTCG CAATTGAAAG TTGGGCTCTT TACTCCTACA ACCTCCATAA AGCAACCTTC 1800

CACGGTCTTG GTCGTCTTGA GTCTCGTAAG AACAAACGTA ACTTCATCCT CGGACGTGGT 1860

AGTTACGCCG GTGCCTATCG TTTTGCTGGT CTCTGGACTG GAGATAACGC AAGTACGTGG 1920

GAATTCTGGA AGATTTCGGT CTCCCAAGTT CTTTCTCTAG GTCTCAATGG TGTGTGTATA 1980 GCGGGGTCTG ATACGGGTGG TTTTGAGCCC GCACGTACTG AGATTGGGGA GGAGAAATAT 2040

TGCAGTCCGG AGCTACTCAT CAGGTGGTAT ACTGGATCAT TCCTTTTGCC ATGGCTTAGA 2100

AACCACTACG TCAAGAAGGA CAGGAAATGG TTCCAGGAAC CATACGCGTA CCCCAAGCAT 2160

CTTGAAACCC ATCCAGAGCT CGCAGATCAA GCATGGCTTT ACAAATCTGT TCTAGAAATT 2220

TGCAGATACT GGGTAGAGCT AAGATATTCC CTCATCCAGC TCCTTTACGA CTGCATGTTC 2280

CAAAACGTGG TCGATGGTAT GCCACTTGCC AGATCTATGC TCTTGACCGA TACTGAGGAT 2340

ACGACCTTCT TCAATGAGAG CCAAAAGTTC CTCGATAACC AATATATGGC TGGTGACGAC 2400

ATCCTTGTAG CACCCATCCT CCACAGCCGT AACGAGGTTC CGGGAGAGAA CAGAGATGTC 2460

TATCTCCCTC TATTCCACAC CTGGTACCCC TCAAACTTGA GACCGTGGGA CGATCAGGGA 2520

GTCGCTTTAG GGAATCCTGT CGAAGGTGGC AGCGTTATCA ACTACACTGC CAGGATTGTT 2580

GCCCCAGAGG ATTATAATCT CTTCCACAAC GTGGTGCCGG TCTACATCAG AGAGGGTGCC 2640

ATCATTCCGC AAATTCAGGT ACGCCAGTGG ATTGGCGAAG GAGGGCCTAA TCCCATCAAG 2700

TTCAATATCT ACCCTGGAAA GGACAAGGAG TATGTGACGT ACCTTGATGA TGGTGTTAGC 2760

CGCGATAGTG CACCAGATGA CCTCCCGCAG TACCGCGAGG CCTATGAGCA AGCGAAGGTC 2820

GAAGGCAAAG ACGTCCAGAA GCAACTTGCG GTCATTCAAG GGAATAAGAC TAATGACTTC 2880

TCCGCCTCCG GGATTGATAA GGAGGCAAAG GGTTATCACC GCAAAGTTTC TATCAAACAG 2940

GAGTCAAAAG ACAAGACCCG TACTGTCACC ATTGAGCCAA AACACAACGG ATACGACCCC 3000

TCTAAGGAAG TTGGTAATTA TTATACCATC ATTCTTTGGT ACGCACCGGG CTTTGACGGC 3060

AGCATCGTCG ATGTGAGCCA GGCGACCGTG AACATCGAGG GCGGGGTGGA ATGCGAAATT 3120

TTCAAGAACA CCGGCTTGCA TACGGTTGTA GTCAACGTGA AAGAGGTGAT CGGTACCACA 3180

AAGTCCGTCA AGATCACTTG CACTACCGCT TAG 3213

SEQ. ID. NO. 11
SEQUENCE TYPE NUCLEIC ACID MOLECULE TYPE DNA (GENOMIC)
ORIGINAL SOURCE ALGAL SEQUENCE LENGTH 3279 BP
STRANDEDNESS DOUBLE SEQUENCE
10 20 30 40 50 60
I I I I I I
1 ATGTTTCCTA CCCTGACCTT CATAGCGCCC AGCGCGCTGG CCGCCAGCAC CTTTGTGGGC

61 GCGGATATCC GATCGGGCAT TCGCATTCAA TCCGCTCTTC CGGCCGTGCG CAACGCTGTG

121 CGCAGGAGCA AACATTACAA TGTATCCATG ACCGCATTGT CTGACAAGCA AACCGCTATC

181 AGTATTGGCC CTGACAATCC GGACGGTATC AACTACCAAA ACTACGATTA CATCCCTGTA

241 GCGGGCTTTA CGCCCCTCTC CAACACCAAC TGGTATGCTG CCGGCTCTTC CACTCCGGGC

301 GGCATCACCG ACTGGACCGC TACCATGAAT GTCAAATTCG ACCGCATTGA CAATCCGTCG

361 TACTCCAATA ACCATCCTGT TCAGATTCAG GTCACGTCGT ACAACAACAA CAGCTTCAGG

421 ATTCGCTTCA ACCCTGATGG CCCCATTCGT GACGTCTCTC GAGGACCTAT CCTGAAACAG

481 CAACTCACTT GGATTCGAAA CCAGGAGCTG GCGCAGGGAT GTAATCCGAA CATGAGCTTC

541 TCTCCTGAAG GTTTTTTGTC TTTTGAAACC AAAGACCTAA ACGTTATAAT CTACGGCAAC

601 TGCAAGATGA GAGTCACGAA GAAGGATGGC TACCTCGTCA TGGAGAATGA CGAGTGCAAC

661 TCGCAATCAG ATGGCAATAA GTGTAGAGGA TTGATGTACG TTGACCGGCT ATACGGTAAT

721 GCTATTGCTT CCGTACAAAC GAATTTTCAC AAAGACACTT CTCGGAACGA GAAATTCTAT

781 GGTGCAGGTG AAGTCAACTG TCGCTATGAG GAGCAGGGTA AGGCGCCGAC TTATGTTCTA

841 GAACGCTCTG GACTCGCCAT GACCAATTAC AATTACGACA ACTTGAACTA CAACCAACCA

901 GACGTCGTTC CTCCAGGTTA TCCCGACCAT CCCAACTACT ACATTCCAAT GTACTACGCA

961 GCACCGTGGT TGGTCGTTCA GGGATGCGCG GGGACATCGA AGCAATACTC GTACGGTTGG

1021 TTTATGGACA ATGTCTCTCA GTCGTACATG AACACTGGAG AACGGCGTG GAACTGCGGA

1081 CAGGAAAACC TGGCATACAT GGGCGCGCAA TACGGGCCAT TTGATCAGCA CTTTGTGTAT

1141 GGTGATGGAG ATGGCCTTGA AGATGTCGTC AAAGCGTTCT CCTTTCTTCA AGGAAAGGAG

1201 TTCGAAGACA AAAAACTCAA CAAGCGTTCT GTAATGCCTC CGAAGTACGT GTTTGGTTTC

1261 TTCCAGGGTG TTTTCGGTGC ACTTTCACTG TTGAAGCAGA ATCTGCCTGC CGGAGAGAAC

1321 AACATCTCAG TGCAAGAGAT TGTGGAGGGT TACCAGGATA ACGACTACCC CTTTGAAGGG

1381 CTCGCGGTAG ATGTTGATAT GCAAGATGAT CTGCGAGTGT TTACTACCAA ACCAGAATAT

1441 TGGTCGGCAA ACATGGTAGG CGAAGGCGGT GATCCTAATA ACAGATCAGT CTTTGAATGG

1501 GCACATGACA GGGGCCTTGT CTGTCAGACG AACGTAACTT GCTTCTTGAG GAACGATAAC

1561 AGTGGGAAAC CATACGAAGT GAATCAGACA TTGAGGGAGA AACAGTTGTA TACGAAGAAT

1621 GATTCCTTGA ACAACACCGA TTTTGGAACT ACCTCGGATG GGCCTGGCGA TGCGTACATT

1681 GGACATTTGG ACTATGGTGG TGGAGTGGAG TGTGATGCAA TCTTCCCAGA CTGGGGTCGA

1741 CCAGACGTGG CTCAATGGTG GGGAGAAAAC TACAAGAAGC TGTTCAGCAT TGGTCTCGAT

1801 TTCGTGTGGC AGGATATGAC GGTACCTGCG ATGATGCCGC ACCGACTCGG TGATGCTGTC

1861 AACAAAAATT CCGGTAGTTC GGCGCCGGGC TGGCCGAATG AGAACGATCC ATCCAACGGA

1921 CGATACAACT GGAAATCTTA TCATCCGCAA GTGCTCGTGA CCGACATGCG CTATGGTGCA

1981 GAGTATGGAA GGGAACCGAT GGTGTCTCAA CGCAACATTC ACGCCTACAC TCTTTGTGAA

2041 TCTACCAGAC GGGAGGGAAT TGTGGGAAAC GCAGACAGTT TGACCAAGTT CCGCCGCAGT 2101 TACATCAT-CA GTCGAGGAGG TTACATCGGT AACCAGCATT TCGGAGGGAT GTGGGTTGGG 2161 GACAACAGTG CCACAGAATC CTACCTCCAA ATGATGTTGG CGAACATTAT CAACATGAAT 2221 ATGTCGTGCC TCCCGCTAGT TGGCTCTGAT ATTGGCGGGT TCACCCAGTA CAATGATGCG 2281 GGCGACCCAA CCCCCGAGGA TTTGATGGTA AGATTCGTGC AGGCTGGCTG TCTGCTACCG 2341 TGGTTCAGAA ACCACTATGA CAGGTGGATT GAGTCCAAGA AGCACGGGAA GAAATACCAG 2401 GAGTTATACA TGTACCCGGG GCAAAAGGAT ACGTTGAAGA AGTTCGTTGA ATTCCGCTAC 2461 CGCTGGCAGG AGGTTTTGTA CACAGCCATG TACCAAAATG CTACCACTGG AGAGCCGATC 2521 ATCAAGGCGG CGCCCATGTA CAACAACGAC GTCAACGTGT ATAAATCGCA GAATGATCAT 2581 TTCCTTCTCG GTGGACATGA CGGCTATCGT ATTCTCTGCG CACCTGTTGT GCGCGAAAAT 2641 OCGACAAGTC GCGAAGTGTA CCTGCCTGTG TATAGCAAGT GGTTCAAATT CGGACCGGAC 2701 TTTGACACTA AGCCCTTGGA AAATGAGATT CAAGGAGGTC AGACGCTTTA TAATTACGCT 2761 GCACCGCTGA ACGATTCGCC GATATTTGTG AGGGAAGGGA CTATTCTTCC GACACGGTAC 2821 ACGCTGGACG GTGTGAACAA ATCTATCAAC ACGTACACAG ACAATGATCC GCTTGTATTT 2881 GAGCTGTTCC CTCTCGAAAA CAACCAGGCG CATGGCTTGT TCTATCATGA TGATGGCGGT 2941 GTCACCACCA ACGCTGAAGA CTTTGGCAAG TATTCTGTGA TCAGTGTGAA GGCCGCGCAG 3001 GAAGGTTCTC AAATGAGTGT CAAGTTTGAC AATGAAGTTT ATGAACACCA ATGGGGAGCA 3061 TCGTTCTATG TTCGTGTTCG TAATATGGGT GCTCCGTCTA ACATCAACGT ATCTTCTCAG 3121 ATTGGTCAAC AGGACATGCA ACAGAGCTCC GTGAGTTCCA GGGCGCAAAT GTTCACTAGT 3181 GCTAACGATG GCGAGTACTG GGTTGACCAG AGCACGAACT CGTTGTGGCT CAAGTTGCCT 3241 GGTGCAGTTA TCCAAGACGC TGCGATCACT GTTCGTTGA
SEQ. ID. NO. 12
SEQUENCE TYPE: NUCLEIC ACID
MOLECULE TYPE: DNA (GENOMIC)
ORIGINAL SOURCE: ALGAL
SEQUENCE LENGTH: 1712 BP
STRANDEDNESS: DOUBLE
SEQUENCE:
10 20 30 40 50 60
I I 1 I I I

1 ATGACAAACT ATAATTATGA CAATTTGAAC TACAATCAAC CGGACCTCAT CCCACCTGGC

61 CATGATTCAG ATCCTGACTA CTATATTCCG ATGTACTTTG CGGCACCATG GGTGATCGCA

121 CATGGATATC GTGGCACCAG CGACCAGTAC TCTTATGGAT GGTTTTTGGA CAATGTATCC

181 CAGTCCTACA CAAACACTGG CGATGATGCA TGGGCTGGTC AGAAGGATTT GGCGTACATG

241 GGGGCACAAT GTGGGCCTTT CGATCAACAT TTTGTGTATG AGGCTGGAGA TGGACTTGAA

301 GACGTTGTGA CCGCATTCTC TTATTTGCAA GGCAAGGAAT ATGAGAACCA GGGACTGAAT

361 ATACGTTCTG CAATGCCTCC GAAGTACGTT TTCGGATTTT TCCAAGGCGT ATTCGGAGCC

421 ACATCGCTGC TAAGGGACAA CTTACCTGCC GGCGAGAACA ACGTCTCTTT GGAAGAAATT

481 GTTGAAGGAT ATCAAAATCA GAACGTGCCA TTTGAAGGTC TTGCTGTGGA TGTTGATATG

541 CAAGATGACT TGAGAGTGTT CACTACGAGA CCAGCGTTTT GGACGGCAAA CAAGGTGGGG

601 GAAGGCGGTG ATCCAAACAA CAAGTCAGTG TTTGAGTGGG CACATGACAG GGGCCTTGTC

661 TGCCAGACGA ATGTAACTTG CTTCTTGAAG AACGAGAAAA ATCCTTACGA AGTGAATCAG

721 TCATTGAGGG AGAAGCAGTT GTATACGAAG AGTGATTCCT TGGACAACAT TGATTTTGGA

781 ACTACTCCAG ATGGGCCTAG CGATGCGTAC ATTGGACACT TAGACTACGG TGGTGGTGTG

841 GAGTGTGATG CACTATTCCC AGACTGGGGT CGACCAGACG TGGCTCAATG GTGGGGCGAT

901 AACTACAAGA AACTATTCAG CATTGGTCTC GATTTCGTCT GGCAAGATAT GACGGTACCT

961 GCGATGATGC CGCACCGACT CGGTGACCCT GTCGGCACAA ATTCCGGTGA GACGGCGCCG

1021 GGCTGGCCGA ATGATAAGGA TCCATCCAAC GGACGATACA AWGGAAGTC TTACCATCCG

1081 CAAGTGCTCG TGACTGACAT GAGGTATGAC GATTACGGAA GAGATCCCAT TGTTACGCAA

1141 CGCAATCTCC ATGCCTACAC TCTTTGTGAG TCTACTAGGA GGGAAGGCAT TGTTGGAAAC

1201 GCAGATAGTC TGACGAAGTT CCGCCGCAGC TATATTATCA GTCGTGGAGG CTACATCGGT

1261 AATCAGCACT TTGGTGGGAT GTGGGTAGGA GACAACTCTT CTACGGAAGA CTACCTCGCA

1321 ATGATGGTTA TCAACGTTAT CAACATGAAC ATGTCCGGTG TCCCGCTCGT TGGTTCCGAT

1381 ATTGGAGGTT TCACGGAGCA TGACAAGAGA AACCCTTGCA CACCGGACTT GATGATGAGA

1441 TTTGTGCAGG CTGGATGCTT GCTACCGTGG TTCAGGAACC ACTACGATAG GTGGATCGAG

1501 AGCAAGAAAC ACGGAAAGAA CTACCAAGAG TTGTACATGT ACCGCGACCA CTTGGACGCC

1561 TTGAGAAGTT TTGTGGAACT CCGCTATCGC TGGCAGGAAG TGTTATACAC AGCCATGTAT

1621 CAGAATGCTT TGAACGGGAA GCCGATCATC AAAACGGTCT CCATGTACAA CAACGATATG

1681 AACGTCAAAG ATGCTCAGAA TGACCACTTC CT