Search International and National Patent Collections
Some content of this application is unavailable at the moment.
If this situation persists, please contact us atFeedback&Contact
1. (US20160306396) Connection Device for Computing Devices
Note: Text based on automatic Optical Character Recognition processes. Please use the PDF version for legal matters
      This application is a continuation and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. 120 to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/891,109, filed May 9, 2013, which is a continuation-in-part and claims priority to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/470,633, filed May 14, 2012, entitled “Flexible Hinge and Removable Attachment,” which further claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to the following U.S. Provisional Patent Applications, the entire disclosures of each of these applications being incorporated by reference in their entirety:
      U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/606,321, filed Mar. 2, 2012, Attorney Docket Number 336082.01, and titled “Screen Edge;”
      U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/606,301, filed Mar. 2, 2012, Attorney Docket Number 336083.01, and titled “Input Device Functionality;”
      U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/606,313, filed Mar. 2, 2012, Attorney Docket Number 336084.01, and titled “Functional Hinge;”
      U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/606,333, filed Mar. 2, 2012, Attorney Docket Number 336086.01, and titled “Usage and Authentication;”
      U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/613,745, filed Mar. 21, 2012, Attorney Docket Number 336086.02, and titled “Usage and Authentication;”
      U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/606,336, filed Mar. 2, 2012, Attorney Docket Number 336087.01, and titled “Kickstand and Camera;” and
      U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/607,451, filed Mar. 6, 2012, Attorney Docket Number 336143.01, and titled “Spanaway Provisional.”

BACKGROUND

      Users have access to a wide variety of different computing devices. For example, a user may interact with a mobile phone, tablet computer, or other mobile computing device to check email, surf the web, compose texts, interact with applications, and so on.
      However, conventional techniques that were utilized to interact with these devices were often limited to the individual devices, themselves. Consequently, even though a user may have access to a wide range of devices and may have that access at any one time (e.g., a mobile phone and a tablet), interaction with these devices could be disjointed, thereby leading to user frustration.

SUMMARY

      A connection device for computing devices is described. In one or more implementations, a connection device comprises a plurality of connection portions that are physically and communicatively coupled, one to another. Each of the plurality of connection portions has at least one communication contact configured to form a communicative coupling with a respective one of a plurality of computing devices and with at least one other communication contact of another one of the connections portions to support communication between the plurality of computing devices. Each of the plurality of connection portions also includes a magnetic coupling device to form a removable magnetic attachment to the respective one of the plurality of computing devices.
      In one or more implementations, a system includes a first computing device having a housing that assumes a slate configuration and a second computing device having a housing that assumes a slate configuration. The second computing device has a removable physical and communicative coupling with the second computing device, the removable physical communicative coupling provided at least in part through use of magnetism.
      In one or more implementations, an apparatus comprises a plurality of connection portions that are configured to magnetically and physically communicatively couple a plurality of mobile computing devices having a slate form factor to each other.
      This Summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary is not intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

      The detailed description is described with reference to the accompanying figures. In the figures, the left-most digit(s) of a reference number identifies the figure in which the reference number first appears. The use of the same reference numbers in different instances in the description and the figures may indicate similar or identical items. Entities represented in the figures may be indicative of one or more entities and thus reference may be made interchangeably to single or plural forms of the entities in the discussion.
       FIG. 1 is an illustration of an environment in an example implementation that is operable to employ the connection techniques described herein.
       FIG. 2 depicts a system showing a connection device in greater detail that is usable to communicatively couple computing devices to each other.
       FIG. 3 depicts an example implementation of a connection portion of a connection device of FIG. 2.
       FIG. 4 depicts a cross section taken of the connection portion and a corresponding cavity of a computing device.
       FIG. 5 depicts example implementations of the conductors that may be employed by the connection device to communicatively couple the connection portions to each other.
       FIG. 6 depicts another example of a cross section taken of the connection portion and a corresponding cavity of the computing device, the connection portion configured to support cam-like movement.
       FIG. 7 depicts another example of a cross section taken of the connection portion and a corresponding cavity of the computing device in which communication contacts are configured as capacitive-coupling pads.
       FIG. 8 depicts another example in which the connection portion is configured to support an optical connection.
       FIG. 9 shows an example in which a cover of FIG. 8 is opened to expose an optical sensor.
       FIG. 10 depicts yet another example in which the computing devices include magnetic coupling portions configured as rotating magnetic hinges.
       FIGS. 11-12 illustrate examples of rotation of the magnetic coupling portions in relation to each other may support a variety of different computing device orientations.
       FIG. 13 depicts an example arrangement that supports a connection between the computing device and an accessory.
       FIGS. 14 and 15 depict yet other examples in which the computing devices include magnetic coupling portions configured as rotating magnetic hinges.
       FIG. 16 depicts an example of a magnetic coupling portion that may be employed by the computing devices or connection device to implement a flux fountain.
       FIG. 17 depicts an example of a magnetic coupling portion that may be employed by the connection device or computing device to implement a flux fountain.
       FIG. 18 illustrates an example system including various components of an example device that can be implemented as any type of computing device as described with reference to FIGS. 1-17 to implement embodiments of the techniques described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

      Overview
      Even though users may have access to a wide range of computing devices, conventional techniques to interact with these devices were provided by the computing devices separately. Accordingly, techniques are described herein to support physical and communicative connections between computing devices. For example, mobile computing devices such as tablets and phones may employ a slate form factor. A connection device may be used to provide a physical (e.g., magnetic) and communicative coupling between the devices, thereby permitting the devices to be used in combination, such as to expand an available display area, share processing and memory resources, and so on.
      The connection device may be configured in a variety of ways. In one such example, the connection device includes a plurality of connection portions. Each of the connection portions is configured to connect to a respective computing device. This may be performed through a communication contact that is configured to support transmission bandwidths (e.g., hundreds of MHz) between the devices that are sufficient to communicate data for display without distortion, which may include the use of leaf springs, capacitive connections, optical connections, and so on.
      A physical coupling may also be provided, at least in part, using magnets. The magnets, for instance, may be used to support a zero to negative insertion force to connect the computing device to the connection portion, e.g., such that the devices “click” together. Thus, a plurality of computing devices may be communicatively and physically coupled to the connection device, which may be used to support a variety of different usage scenarios, further discussion of which may be found in relation to the following sections.
      In the following discussion, an example environment is first described that may employ the techniques described herein. Example procedures are then described which may be performed in the example environment as well as other environments. Consequently, performance of the example procedures is not limited to the example environment and the example environment is not limited to performance of the example procedures. Further, although connection of computing devices is described, other devices are also contemplated, such as covers. For example, these techniques are equally applicable to input devices and passive devices, e.g., a cover having one or more materials (e.g., magnets, ferrous material, and so on) that are configured and positioned within the cover to be attracted to magnetic coupling devices of the computing device, use of protrusions and connecting portion, and so on as further described below.
      Example Environment
       FIG. 1 is an illustration of an environment 100 in an example implementation that is operable to employ the connection device techniques described herein. The illustrated environment 100 includes examples of computing devices 102, 104 that are physically and communicatively coupled via a connection device 106. The computing devices 102, 104 may be configured in a variety of ways. For example, computing devices 102, 104 may be configured for mobile use and therefore be referred to as mobile computing devices, such as a mobile phone, a tablet computer as illustrated, a portable game device, a portable music device, and so on. Other non-mobile examples are also contemplated, such as laptop computers, desktop computers, servers, and so on. Thus, the computing devices 102, 104 may range from full resource devices with substantial memory and processor resources to a low-resource device with limited memory and/or processing resources. The computing devices 102, 104 may also relate to software that causes the computing devices 102, 104 to perform one or more operations.
      The computing devices 102, 104, for instance, are each illustrated as including a respective input/output module 108, 110. The input/output modules 108, 110 are representative of functionality relating to processing of inputs and rendering outputs of the respective computing device 102, 104. A variety of different inputs may be processed by the input/output modules 108, 110 such as inputs relating to functions that correspond to keys of an accessory device, keys of a virtual keyboard displayed by the display devices 112, 114 to identify gestures and cause operations to be performed that correspond to the gestures that may be recognized through touchscreen functionality, and so forth. Thus, the input/output modules 108, 110 may support a variety of different input techniques by recognizing and leveraging a division between types of inputs including key presses, gestures, and so on.
      The computing devices 102, 104 are illustrated as being physically and communicatively coupled through use of a connection device 106. The connection device 106 may thus be used to support a variety of different usage scenarios for the computing devices 102, 104. This may include use of the computing devices 102, 104 in a manner that mimics a multi-monitor setup, a parent/child control arrangement, and so on. This may also include sharing resources of the devices, such as processing, memory, network connection, and other resources. In the illustrated example, computing device 104 displays a start screen on the display device 114 that is usable to select applications for execution and display by the display device 112 of computing device 102 as well as on a display device 114 of the computing device 104, itself. The connection device 106 may be configured in a variety of ways to support this connection, an example of which is described as follows and shown in a corresponding figure.
       FIG. 2 depicts a system 200 showing a connection device 202 in greater detail that is usable to communicatively couple the computing devices 102, 104 to each other. In this example, the connection device 106 includes a plurality of connection portions 202, 204. Each of the connection portions 202, 204 is configured to be received in a respective cavity of a respective computing device 102, 104. In the illustrated instance, the connection portions 202, 204 may be attached to the respective computing devices 102, 104 in either direction as the shapes of the portions is symmetrical.
      The computing devices 102, 104 may be configured to use the cavities to support connections to peripheral devices, such as keyboard, input devices, electronic paper display devices, and so on. Accordingly, in this example the connection device 106 may be configured to leverage this connection to support a connection between computing devices as further described below.
      The plurality of connection portions 202, 204 are communicatively coupled in this example using a flexible hinge 206. The flexible hinge 206 is flexible in that rotational movement supported by the hinge is achieved through flexing (e.g., bending) of the material forming the hinge as opposed to mechanical rotation as supported by a pin, although that embodiment is also contemplated. Further, this flexible rotation may be configured to support movement in one or more directions (e.g., vertically in the figure) yet restrict movement in other directions, such as lateral movement of the computing device 104 in relation to the computing device 102. This may be used to support consistent alignment of the computing devices 102, 104.
      The flexible hinge 206, for instance, may be formed using one or more layers of fabric and include conductors formed as flexible traces to communicatively couple the input device 104 to the computing device 102 and vice versa. This communication, for instance, may be used to communicate inputs between the computing devices 102, 104, transfer power, perform authentication, and so on. The flexible hinge 206 may be configured in a variety of ways, further discussion of which may be found in relation to the following figure.
       FIG. 3 depicts an example implementation 300 of the connection portion 202 of the connection device 106 of FIG. 2. In this example, the connection portion 202 is illustrated as having a protrusion 302 that is configured to be received in a cavity of a corresponding computing device 102 as described above. The protrusion 302 includes magnetic coupling devices 304, 306, mechanical coupling protrusions (e.g., “fangs”) 308, 310, and a plurality of communication contacts 312. The magnetic coupling devices 304, 306 are configured to magnetically couple to complementary magnetic coupling devices of the computing device 102 through use of one or more magnets. In this way, the connection portion 202 may be physically secured to the computing device 102 through use of magnetic attraction.
      The connection portion 202 also includes mechanical coupling protrusions 308, 310 to form a mechanical physical connection between the connection portion 202 and the computing device 102. The mechanical coupling protrusions 308, 310 are configured to extend away from a surface of the connection portion 202, which in this case is perpendicular although other angles are also contemplated.
      The mechanical coupling protrusions 308, 310 are configured to be received within complimentary cavities within a channel of the computing device 102. When so received, the mechanical coupling protrusions 308, 310 promote a mechanical binding between the devices when forces are applied that are not aligned with an axis that is defined as correspond to the height of the protrusions and the depth of the cavity. In this way, the connection portion 202 may be separated from the computing device in a motion similar to tearing a page from a book but mechanically binds when confronted with other motions, thereby promoting a secure connection between the devices.
      The connection portion 202 is also illustrated as including a plurality of communication contacts 312. The plurality of communication contacts 312 is configured to contact corresponding communication contacts of the computing device 102 to form a communicative coupling between the devices as shown and discussed in greater detail in relation to the following figure.
       FIG. 4 depicts a cross section 400 taken of the connection portion 202 and a corresponding cavity 402 of the computing device. In this example, the flexible hinge 206 is also shown in greater detail. The flexible hinge 206 in this cross section includes a conductor 404 that is configured to communicatively couple the connection portions 202, 204 to each other. The conductor 404 may be formed in a variety of ways, such as a copper trace that has an operational flexibility to permit operation as part of the flexible hinge, e.g., to support repeated flexing of the flexible hinge 206. Flexibility of the conductor 404, however, may be limited, e.g., may remain operational to conduct signals for flexing that is performed above a minimum bend radius.
      Accordingly, the flexible hinge 206 may be configured to support a minimum bend radius based on the operational flexibility of the conductor 404 such that the flexible hinge 206 resists flexing below that radius. A variety of different techniques may be employed. The flexible hinge 206, for instance, may be configured to include first and second outer layers 406, 408, which may be formed from a fabric, microfiber cloth, and so on. Flexibility of material used to form the first and/or second outer layers 406, 408 may be configured to support flexibility as described above such that the conductor 404 is not broken or otherwise rendered inoperable during movement of the connection portions 202, 204 in relation to each other.
      In another instance, the flexible hinge 206 may include a mid-spine 410 located between the connection portions 202, 204. The mid-spine 410, for example, includes a first flexible portion 414 that flexibly connects the connection portion 202 to the mid-spine 410 and a second flexible portion 414 that flexibly connects the mid-spine 410 to the other connection portion 420.
      In the illustrated example, the first and second outer layers 406, 408 extend over the first and second flexible portions 412, 414 of the flexible hinge 206 and are secured to the connection portions 202, 204, e.g., via clamping, adhesive, and so on. The conductor 404 is disposed between the first and second outer layers 406, 408 with the mid-spine 410 configured to provide mechanical stiffness to a particular location of the flexible hinge 206 to support a desired minimum bend radius.
      The communication contact 312 is also shown in cross section in this example. The communication contact 312 in this example is configured as a spring pin that support sliding movement as part of engagement with communication contacts 416 in the cavity of the computing device 102. This sliding motion may support surface cleaning of the communication contact 312, thereby promoting a robust connection.
      The communication contact 312 may be formed in a variety of different ways. This may include use of electrical transmission line principles to avoid distortion of the digital waveforms to provide generally uniform impedance through use of differential pairs of communication contacts 312. A characteristic impedance may be set through controlled trace widths, trace-to-trace gaps, choice of dielectric material, and separations from a ground plane. Further, the communication contact 312 and/or conductor 404 may be disposed proximal to a dielectric that is adjacent to a ground plane to control impedance. Contact resistance of the communication contact 312 may also be configured. This is conventionally performed using a high insertion force to maintain a well-toleranced contact resistance.
      However, in one or more implementations the connection portion 202 may be configured to employ a zero to negative insertion force. This may be performed by leveraging a clamping force provided by the magnetic coupling devices 304, 306 providing a zero to negative insertion force of the connection portion 202 to the computing device 102. In this way, the connection portion 202 and the computing device 102 may “click” together with alignment provided automatically through the magnetic coupling devices 304, 306. As shown in FIG. 4, for instance, a sliding and clamping motion may be supported in the same movement to connect the devices, thereby promoting consistent impedance and cleanliness of the communication contacts 312, 416.
      Once connected, the computing devices may determine an orientation relative to each other, which may be used to configure a user interface that continues across the devices. For example, the orientation of the device may be deduced individually and separately, such as through use of one or more orientation sensors by the device and knowledge of location of where the communication contacts are disposed on the device. In this way, an orientation of the device may be determined as well as a like orientation of a connected device.
      In another example, the two device may communicate with each other, such as to acknowledge a computed orientation, e.g., whether in portrait or landscape mode as well as to the “right” or “left”, “top” or “bottom,” and so on. Thus, this example may have increased robustness. Other examples are also contemplated.
       FIG. 5 depicts example implementations 500 of the conductors 404 that may be employed by the connection device 106 to communicatively couple the connection portions 202, 204 to each other. In a first example 502, a microstrip transmission line is shown in which conductors 404 have widths, heights, and spacing to provide desired transmission properties.
      In one or more implementations, placement of the magnetic coupling portions near the communication contacts 312 and conductors 404 may cause capacitance near these structures to be modified, which may cause impedance disturbance and distortion of signals transmitted by the conductors. Therefore, in the second example 504, a stripline transmission line is shown in which the conductor 404 is disposed between two ground planes. In this way, signals transmitted by the conductor 404 may be protected from modified capacitance that may be caused by the magnetic coupling devices 304, 306. A variety of other examples are also contemplated.
       FIG. 6 depicts another example 600 of a cross section taken of the connection portion 202 and a corresponding cavity 402 of the computing device 102, the connection portion 202 configured to support cam-like movement. As before, the connection portion 202 is configured as a protrusion that is to be received within a cavity 402 of a computing device 102 such that communication contacts 312, 416 form a communicative coupling.
      In this example, the connection portion includes a magnet 602 that is configured to be attracted to a magnet 604 disposed as part of the cavity 402 of the computing device 102. Due to the curved surfaces of the connection portion 202 and the cavity 402, a cam action is caused by the attraction of the magnets 602, 604 such that the connection portion 202 rotates 606 in relation to the cavity 402. This rotation 606 causes the communication contact 312 to slide against the communication contact 416 of the computing device 102, thereby cleaning the surfaces of the contacts and promoting a consistent communicative coupling as previously described. In these examples, the communication contact 312 is configured as a leaf spring, other examples are also contemplated which are described as follows and shown in a corresponding figure.
       FIG. 7 depicts another example 700 of a cross section taken of the connection portion 202 and a corresponding cavity 402 of the computing device in which communication contacts 312, 416 are configured as capacitive-coupling pads. As before, the connection portion 202 is configured as a protrusion that is to be received within a cavity 402 of a computing device 102 such that communication contacts 312, 416 form a communicative coupling.
      In this example, however, each of the communication contacts 312, 416 includes a dielectric 702, 704 disposed proximal to (e.g., covering) conductors of the communication contacts 312, 416. In this way, the communication contacts 312, 416 form AC-coupling capacitors, thereby avoiding issues such as a firm and clean physical contact between the communication contacts 312, 416.
       FIG. 8 depicts another example 800 in which the connection portion 202 is configured to support an optical connection. In this example, the connection portion 202 includes a cover 802 and two cover rotation mechanisms 804, 806 that are coupled to the cover 802 using axles that are illustrated in phantom in the figure.
      The two cover rotation mechanisms 804, 806 are configured to bias the cover 802 in the closed position as shown in FIG. 8, such as through use of one or more return springs. The cover rotation mechanisms 804, 806 include diametrically magnetized magnets that are configured to rotate the axles, which may be configured such that the magnets have magnetic field lines that are aligned at a right angle to a surface of the connection portion 202.
      Therefore, the cover rotation mechanisms 804, 806 may be configured to rotate the cover 802 in the presence of a magnetic field having a corresponding alignment, e.g., from magnets of the computing device 102. A cylindrical magnet of the cover rotation mechanisms 804, 806, for instance, may rotate against a return force of a biasing mechanism (e.g., a spring) to align with the field lines of the adjacent magnet of the computing device 102, thereby opening the cover 802 as shown in the example implementation 900 of FIG. 9. Once the two devices are brought out of proximity, the biasing mechanism may cause the cover 802 to return to a closed position as shown in FIG. 8.
      Once the cover 802 is opened as shown in FIG. 9, optical sensors 902 may be exposed on the connection portion 202 for communication with corresponding optical sensors of the computing device 102. In this way, the optical sensors 902 may be protected from contaminants and support a high bandwidth connection between the computing devices 102, 104.
       FIG. 10 depicts yet another example 1000 in which the computing devices 102, 104 include magnetic coupling portions configured as rotating magnetic hinges. This example is shown through first and second stages 1002, 1004. At the first stage 1002, the magnetic coupling portions 1006, 1008 are integrated as part of the respective computing devices 102, 104. The magnetic coupling portions 1006, 1008 are configured to support hinge-able attachment of the devices to each other. Connections for data and power between the two computing devices 102, 104 may be connected to the same axle as the magnets so that the connections of the respective computing devices 102, 104 face each other when brought together.
      The magnetic coupling portions 1006, 1008, for instance, may employ spring-loaded rotating magnets. The magnet polarity is S-symmetric around the center of the edge being joined so that an identical pair of computing devices 102, 104 may be connected by rotating one of the magnetic coupling portions 1006, 1008 at 180 degrees compared to the other, as shown in the second stage 1004. Thus, when the computing devices 102, 104 are brought together, the magnets rotate around their axis and pull the “hinge” together. Matching/interlocking dimples or ridges may also be employed for fine-grain alignment of the computing devices 102, 104 to each other. Thus, the magnets may rotate around an axis but are lightly spring-loaded to return to a neutral state as shown in the first stage. For sake of clarity in the figure, near-end magnet orientation is shown.
      Rotation of the magnetic coupling portions 1006, 1008 in relation to each other may support a variety of different computing device 102, 104 orientations, examples 1100, 1200 are shown in FIGS. 11-12. In the example 1300 shown in FIG. 13, this arrangement may also be leveraged to support a connection between the computing device 102 and an accessory device 1302, such as a keyboard or other input device. The accessory device 1302 may also include a complementary arrangement of magnets 1304 to support a similar physical and communicative coupling. Although the magnets shown in the previous examples are cylindrical, the face configured to support the physical connection may also be configured as substantially flat, which may increase the strength of the magnetic connection.
       FIGS. 14 and 15 depict yet other examples 1400, 1500 in which the computing devices 102, 104 include magnetic coupling portions configured as rotating magnetic hinges. Communication contacts are generally kept relatively small for cost, real-estate, and impedance reasons and may be spring-loaded to maintain a consistent connection. Connecting surfaces of the communication contacts may be coated with a non-reactive, highly conductive metal such as gold, which may help maintain this functionality. However, this may leave a thin coating of metal over a small area that may be exposed to abrasion or snagging when the connector is not engaged. Further, in the case of connecting two identical computing devices directly, traditional socket/plug which could afford opportunities to recess the contacting surfaces may not “line up” for use in connection the devices directly.
      Accordingly, the computing device 102 and connection portion 202 and/or another computing device 104 may employ retracting communication contacts 312, 416. The connection portion 202 and the computing device 102, for instance, may include magnetic coupling devices 1402, 1404 that are configured to be attracted to each other. The magnetic coupling devices 1402, 1404 and respective communication contacts 312, 416 may be disposed on a surface that is biased to a retracted state through one or more springs 1406, 1408 as shown in FIG. 14.
      As the computing device 102 and connection portion 202 are brought together, however, attraction of the magnetic coupling devices 1402, 1404 to each other may cause the springs 1406, 1408 to compress and cause the communication contacts 312 to emerge and eventually touch as shown in the example 1500 of FIG. 15. In this way, the communication contacts 312, 416 may be protected from abrasion and contaminants yet still support a consistent connection between the devices. Once influence of the magnets is removed, the communication contacts 312, 416 may return to a retracted state as shown in FIG. 14. A variety of different configurations of magnets may be used as part of the magnetic coupling devices described in this example as well as the previous examples of FIGS. 1-13, further examples of which are described as follows and shown in a corresponding figure.
       FIG. 16 depicts an example 1600 of a magnetic coupling portion that may be employed by the connection device 106 or computing device 102 to implement a flux fountain. In this example, alignment of a magnet field is indicted for each of a plurality of magnets using arrows.
      A first magnet 1602 is disposed in the magnetic coupling device having a magnetic field aligned along an axis. Second and third magnets 1604, 1606 are disposed on opposing sides of the first magnet 1602. The alignment of the respective magnetic fields of the second and third magnets 1604, 1606 is substantially perpendicular to the axis of the first magnet 1602 and generally opposed each other.
      In this case, the magnetic fields of the second and third magnets are aimed towards the first magnet 1602. This causes the magnetic field of the first magnet 1602 to extend further along the indicated axis, thereby increasing a range of the magnetic field of the first magnet 1602.
      The effect may be further extended using fourth and fifth magnets 1608, 1610. In this example, the fourth and fifth magnets 1608, 1610 have magnetic fields that are aligned as substantially opposite to the magnetic field of the first magnet 1602. Further, the second magnet 1604 is disposed between the fourth magnet 1608 and the first magnet 1602. The third magnet 1606 is disposed between the first magnet 1602 and the fifth magnet 1610. Thus, the magnetic fields of the fourth and fifth magnets 1608, 1610 may also be caused to extend further along their respective axes which may further increase the strength of these magnets as well as other magnets in the collection. This arrangement of five magnets is suitable to form a flux fountain. Although five magnets were described, any odd number of magnets of five and greater may repeat this relationship to form flux fountains of even greater strength.
      To magnetically attach to another magnetic coupling device, a similar arrangement of magnets may be disposed “on top” or “below” of the illustrated arrangement, e.g., so the magnetic fields of the first, fourth and fifth magnets 1602, 1608, 1610 are aligned with corresponding magnets above or below those magnets. Further, in the illustrated example, the strength of the first, fourth, and fifth magnets 1602, 1608, 1610 is stronger than the second and third magnets 1604, 1606, although other implementations are also contemplated. Another example of a flux fountain is described in relation to the following discussion of the figure.
       FIG. 17 depicts an example 1700 of a magnetic coupling portion that may be employed by the connection device 106 or computing device 102 to implement a flux fountain. In this example, alignment of a magnet field is also indicted for each of a plurality of magnets using arrows.
      Like the example 1600 of FIG. 16, a first magnet 1702 is disposed in the magnetic coupling device having a magnetic field aligned along an axis. Second and third magnets 1704, 1706 are disposed on opposing sides of the first magnet 1702. The alignment of the magnetic fields of the second and third magnets 1704, 1706 are substantially perpendicular the axis of the first magnet 1702 and generally opposed each other like the example 1600 of FIG. 16.
      In this case, the magnetic fields of the second and third magnets are aimed towards the first magnet 1702. This causes the magnetic field of the first magnet 1702 to extend further along the indicated axis, thereby increasing a range of the magnetic field of the first magnet 1702.
      This effect may be further extended using fourth and fifth magnets 1708, 1710. In this example, the fourth magnet 1708 has a magnetic field that is aligned as substantially opposite to the magnetic field of the first magnet 1702. The fifth magnet 1710 has a magnetic field that is aligned as substantially corresponding to the magnet field of the second magnet 1704 and is substantially opposite to the magnetic field of the third magnet 1706. The fourth magnet 1708 is disposed between the third and fifth magnets 1706, 1710 in the magnetic coupling device.
      This arrangement of five magnets is suitable to form a flux fountain. Although five magnets are described, any odd number of magnets of five and greater may repeat this relationship to form flux fountains of even greater strength. Thus, the magnetic fields of the first 1702 and fourth magnet 1708 may also be caused to extend further along its axis which may further increase the strength of this magnet.
      To magnetically attach to another magnetic coupling device, a similar arrangement of magnets may be disposed “on top” or “below” of the illustrated arrangement, e.g., so the magnetic fields of the first and fourth magnets 1702, 1708 are aligned with corresponding magnets above or below those magnets. Further, in the illustrated example, the strength of the first and fourth magnets 1702, 1708 (individually) is stronger than a strength of the second, third and fifth magnets 1704, 1706, 1710, although other implementations are also contemplated.
      Further, the example 1600 of FIG. 16, using similar sizes of magnets, may have increased magnetic coupling as opposed to the example 1700 of FIG. 17. For instance, the example 1600 of FIG. 16 uses three magnets (e.g. the first, fourth, and fifth magnets 1602, 1608, 1610) to primarily provide the magnetic coupling, with two magnets used to “steer” the magnetic fields of those magnets, e.g., the second and third magnets 1604, 1606. However, the example 1700 of FIG. 17 uses two magnets (e.g., the first and fourth magnets 1702, 1708) to primarily provide the magnetic coupling, with three magnets used to “steer” the magnetic fields of those magnets, e.g., the second, third, and fifth magnets 1704, 1706, 1708.
      Accordingly, though, the example 1700 of FIG. 17, using similar sizes of magnets, may have increased magnetic alignment capabilities as opposed to the example 1600 of FIG. 16. For instance, the example 1700 of FIG. 17 uses three magnets (e.g. the second, third, and fifth magnets 1704, 1706, 1710) to “steer” the magnetic fields of the first and fourth magnets 1702, 1708, which are used to provide primary magnetic coupling. Therefore, the alignment of the fields of the magnets in the example 1700 of FIG. 17 may be closer than the alignment of the example 1600 of FIG. 16.
      Regardless of the technique employed, it should be readily apparent that the “steering” or “aiming” of the magnetic fields described may be used to increase an effective range of the magnets, e.g., in comparison with the use of the magnets having similar strengths by themselves in a conventional aligned state. In one or more implementations, this causes an increase from a few millimeters using an amount of magnetic material to a few centimeters using the same amount of magnetic material.
      Example System and Device
       FIG. 18 illustrates an example system generally at 1800 that includes an example computing device 1802 that is representative of one or more computing systems and/or devices that may implement the various techniques described herein. The computing device 1802 may be, for example, be configured to assume a mobile configuration through use of a housing formed and size to be grasped and carried by one or more hands of a user, illustrated examples of which include a mobile phone, mobile game and music device, and tablet computer although other examples are also contemplated.
      The example computing device 1802 as illustrated includes a processing system 1804, one or more computer-readable media 1806, and one or more I/O interface 1808 that are communicatively coupled, one to another. Although not shown, the computing device 1802 may further include a system bus or other data and command transfer system that couples the various components, one to another. A system bus can include any one or combination of different bus structures, such as a memory bus or memory controller, a peripheral bus, a universal serial bus, and/or a processor or local bus that utilizes any of a variety of bus architectures. A variety of other examples are also contemplated, such as control and data lines.
      The processing system 1804 is representative of functionality to perform one or more operations using hardware. Accordingly, the processing system 1804 is illustrated as including hardware element 1810 that may be configured as processors, functional blocks, and so forth. This may include implementation in hardware as an application specific integrated circuit or other logic device formed using one or more semiconductors. The hardware elements 1810 are not limited by the materials from which they are formed or the processing mechanisms employed therein. For example, processors may be comprised of semiconductor(s) and/or transistors (e.g., electronic integrated circuits (ICs)). In such a context, processor-executable instructions may be electronically-executable instructions.
      The computer-readable storage media 1806 is illustrated as including memory/storage 1812. The memory/storage 1812 represents memory/storage capacity associated with one or more computer-readable media. The memory/storage component 1812 may include volatile media (such as random access memory (RAM)) and/or nonvolatile media (such as read only memory (ROM), Flash memory, optical disks, magnetic disks, and so forth). The memory/storage component 1812 may include fixed media (e.g., RAM, ROM, a fixed hard drive, and so on) as well as removable media (e.g., Flash memory, a removable hard drive, an optical disc, and so forth). The computer-readable media 1806 may be configured in a variety of other ways as further described below.
      Input/output interface(s) 1808 are representative of functionality to allow a user to enter commands and information to computing device 1802, and also allow information to be presented to the user and/or other components or devices using various input/output devices. Examples of input devices include a keyboard, a cursor control device (e.g., a mouse), a microphone, a scanner, touch functionality (e.g., capacitive or other sensors that are configured to detect physical touch), a camera (e.g., which may employ visible or non-visible wavelengths such as infrared frequencies to recognize movement as gestures that do not involve touch), and so forth. Examples of output devices include a display device (e.g., a monitor or projector), speakers, a printer, a network card, tactile-response device, and so forth. Thus, the computing device 1802 may be configured in a variety of ways to support user interaction.
      The computing device 1802 is further illustrated as being communicatively and physically coupled to an input device 1814 that is physically and communicatively removable from the computing device 1802. In this way, a variety of different input devices may be coupled to the computing device 1802 having a wide variety of configurations to support a wide variety of functionality. In this example, the input device 1814 includes one or more keys 1816, which may be configured as pressure sensitive keys, mechanically switched keys, and so forth.
      The input device 1814 is further illustrated as include one or more modules 1818 that may be configured to support a variety of functionality. The one or more modules 1818, for instance, may be configured to process analog and/or digital signals received from the keys 1816 to determine whether a keystroke was intended, determine whether an input is indicative of resting pressure, support authentication of the input device 1814 for operation with the computing device 1802, and so on.
      Various techniques may be described herein in the general context of software, hardware elements, or program modules. Generally, such modules include routines, programs, objects, elements, components, data structures, and so forth that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. The terms “module,” “functionality,” and “component” as used herein generally represent software, firmware, hardware, or a combination thereof. The features of the techniques described herein are platform-independent, meaning that the techniques may be implemented on a variety of commercial computing platforms having a variety of processors.
      An implementation of the described modules and techniques may be stored on or transmitted across some form of computer-readable media. The computer-readable media may include a variety of media that may be accessed by the computing device 1802. By way of example, and not limitation, computer-readable media may include “computer-readable storage media” and “computer-readable signal media.”
      “Computer-readable storage media” may refer to media and/or devices that enable persistent and/or non-transitory storage of information in contrast to mere signal transmission, carrier waves, or signals per se. Thus, computer-readable storage media refers to non-signal bearing media. The computer-readable storage media includes hardware such as volatile and non-volatile, removable and non-removable media and/or storage devices implemented in a method or technology suitable for storage of information such as computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, logic elements/circuits, or other data. Examples of computer-readable storage media may include, but are not limited to, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other memory technology, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (DVD) or other optical storage, hard disks, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or other storage device, tangible media, or article of manufacture suitable to store the desired information and which may be accessed by a computer.
      “Computer-readable signal media” may refer to a signal-bearing medium that is configured to transmit instructions to the hardware of the computing device 1802, such as via a network. Signal media typically may embody computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data in a modulated data signal, such as carrier waves, data signals, or other transport mechanism. Signal media also include any information delivery media. The term “modulated data signal” means a signal that has one or more of its characteristics set or changed in such a manner as to encode information in the signal. By way of example, and not limitation, communication media include wired media such as a wired network or direct-wired connection, and wireless media such as acoustic, RF, infrared, and other wireless media.
      As previously described, hardware elements 1810 and computer-readable media 1806 are representative of modules, programmable device logic and/or fixed device logic implemented in a hardware form that may be employed in some embodiments to implement at least some aspects of the techniques described herein, such as to perform one or more instructions. Hardware may include components of an integrated circuit or on-chip system, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), a complex programmable logic device (CPLD), and other implementations in silicon or other hardware. In this context, hardware may operate as a processing device that performs program tasks defined by instructions and/or logic embodied by the hardware as well as a hardware utilized to store instructions for execution, e.g., the computer-readable storage media described previously.
      Combinations of the foregoing may also be employed to implement various techniques described herein. Accordingly, software, hardware, or executable modules may be implemented as one or more instructions and/or logic embodied on some form of computer-readable storage media and/or by one or more hardware elements 1810. The computing device 1802 may be configured to implement particular instructions and/or functions corresponding to the software and/or hardware modules. Accordingly, implementation of a module that is executable by the computing device 1802 as software may be achieved at least partially in hardware, e.g., through use of computer-readable storage media and/or hardware elements 1810 of the processing system 1804. The instructions and/or functions may be executable/operable by one or more articles of manufacture (for example, one or more computing devices 1802 and/or processing systems 1804) to implement techniques, modules, and examples described herein.
      Conclusion
      Although the example implementations have been described in language specific to structural features and/or methodological acts, it is to be understood that the implementations defined in the appended claims is not necessarily limited to the specific features or acts described. Rather, the specific features and acts are disclosed as example forms of implementing the claimed features.