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1. (CA2786703) TRAINING APPARATUS
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TRAINING APPARATUS
The invention relates to a training apparatus for body-weight exercises. More particularly, the invention relates to a training apparatus including a movable platform for a person who is to train a muscle that moves a body'.:,joint, the training apparatus including at least one transmission device with an associated rotatable manoeuvring element which is arranged to move the platform along an axis which has a directional component which is parallel to the force of gravity as the manoeuvring element is operated.
There are many forms of training for increasing muscular strength and for training muscular strength in the rehabilitation after injury or illness. Training of musculature is conditional on work being carried out against resistance. The resistance may be, for example, the person's own weight, different forms of weights, elastic cords or springs. With the exception of musculature connected to the lung and heart functions, the major part of the skeletal musculature is connected to the bending and extending of joints. Training to increase the strength of such muscles is traditionally carried out by the body being held stationary while the desired muscle or group of muscles is moved against resistance. Therefore many types of strength-training apparatuses formed as benches or seats for this purpose.
There are also a number of strength exercises in which the body itself constitutes the weight resistance. Among such exercises are mentioned "sit-ups", back extension and press-ups. Some of these exercises are heavier in that they involve lifting the entire or almost the entire body, so-called body-weight exercises. Examples of such exercises are pull-ups on a bar, hand-stand "push-ups" and one-leg squats.
It is a matter of general knowledge that the force that a muscle or a muscle group can exert depends on the angle of io the joint which is flexed. When the joint is bent to its maximum, the force is relatively small because the moment arm is long. When the joint is bent between approximately 900 and approximately 30 , the muscle or muscle group is at its strongest. The force then decreases as the joint is extended is completely. Some modern training apparatuses are of such construction that they account for this. By means of belts or straps extending over eccentric wheels, for example, the resistance may be varied through the course of movement.
In recent years, more knowledge has been gained about the 20 importance of involving more of the entire body in training to strengthen musculature and stimulate neuromuscular function. These are forms of training which also lie closer to normal patterns of movement. Instead of just activating one muscle or one muscle group, more muscle groups are 25 involved in so-called co-activation. This also increases the activity of the nervous system as more reflexes become involved. Such reflexes may be, for example, to keep the body in balance. Movement of the body also stimulates the sensorymotor control. For example, the balance organ of the ear and 30 vision are involved in such exercises. Especially in training after pain and injury, it has turned out that the training progress is improved, measured in pain and function, by training with body-weight exercises involving co-activation.
Co-activating exercises can be carried out with parts of the body on,an unstable surface. An example of such a co-activating exercise is "push-ups" in a sling. Instead of the person supporting his hands on the floor, his hands are placed in so-called slings which are a few centimetres above the immovable surface. Each sling is attached to a rope hanging from an anchorage point, for example in the ceiling. Such a training apparatus is marketed under the trade name "Redcord
Trainer". The sling can be moved in all directions horizontally. By performing "push-ups" in slings, the triceps and pectoralis are trained in the usual way and, in addition, a number of other muscles in the shoulder portion, truncus and lower extremities are involved to balance the body by preventing the sling from moving forwards, backwards and sideways. This is also an example of a body-weight exercise.
Sling-based training gives good effect in recuperative training and rehabilitation training through neuromuscular stimulation (according to the so-called neuromuscular method) which comprises co-activation, reflex activation and stimulation of sensory-motor control. One drawback of training in a sling is that at the end of a rehabilitation period it is difficult to dose up the weight resistance the way it is possible in conventional stationary training apparatuses. For the training of some joints it is complicated to get ready in the sling to find a good position. Some find this preparation so time-consuming that they would sooner perform the exercises on ordinary training apparatuses even though this does not give the same neuromuscular effect.
From the patent US 3207508 is known an apparatus consisting of a cage with a through axle hanging on two lines. By a person walking inside the cage in the same way as on a treadmill, the lines are reeled onto two drums and the cage is lifted upwards. The apparatus is not intended for resistance varying as the lines are reeled onto drums of s constant diameters, and the lines are to be laid on the drums in just one layer. There is also a relatively large distance between the rotational axis of the cage and the body joints involved in moving the cage upwards, mainly the knee joints and hip joints.
3.0 From US 5695438 is known an apparatus for training the back, abdomen, neck and shoulders. A pivotable swing can rotate 3600 in a stand. The person is strapped in the swing in such a way that the person's centre of gravity, principally at the level of the navel, is near the rotational axis of the swing.
15 By gripping an annular handle, the person may move into any position from, for example, upright via horizontally prostrate into head stand and back into upright via horizontally supine. The swing may further be locked in any position for exercises to be performed, and it then forms a 20 stable training apparatus. The exercises carried out in the apparatus are not body-weight exercises as the feet are secured in a foot loop while the upper body is held fixed between a belly pad and a back pad.
From US 7066868 is known an apparatus for training the arms. 25 A frame has a U-shaped swing portion attached to it, with a seat and a pair of handles which are fixed to the frame during use. By pulling or pushing at the fixed handles, a person positioned in the seat will swing forwards and upwards or backwards and upwards, respectively, around the rotational 30 axis of the U-shaped portion. The handles have been made adjustable by being rotatable around the same axis as the rotational axis of the U-shaped portion, but they are locked in a desired position by means of a locking disc before the exercise starts. The apparatus is not provided with a transmission device, the handle does not pivot as the exercise is carried out and, according to the design of the s apparatus, the rotational axis of the U-shaped portion will be near or at a distance from the body joints involved in the training.
By supporting elements are meant, here, elongated means such as, but not limited to, ropes, lines, wires, which can be secured to a fastening element above the training apparatus, such as a beam, a boom or a ceiling. By supporting elements are meant, here, also elongated means like, but not limited to, rails, bails and pitch racks which may be fixed to a fastening element above the training apparatus, such as a as beam, a boom or a ceiling, or fixed to a fastening element under the training apparatus, such as a floor. The supporting element may have a substantially vertical longitudinal axis in its position of use, or the supporting element may have a tilted longitudinal axis in its position of use.
The invention has for its object to remedy or reduce at least one of the drawbacks of the prior art, or at least provide a useful alternative to the prior art.
The object is achieved through features which are specified in the description below and in the claims that follow.
A purpose of the invention is to provide a training apparatus which involves co-activation of musculature, is suitable for body-weight exercises and is sensory-motor stimulating, and in which it should be possible to dose the load through the course of movement in such a way that the load will be relatively small at the extreme points of the joint and relatively great in mid-movement. It is a further object that the training apparatus is arranged to adjust the weight resistance as easily as in an ordinary training apparatus.
In a first aspect the invention relates to a training apparatus which includes, in the position of use, a movable platform for a person who is to train a muscle that moves a body joint training, characterized by the training apparatus including at least one transmission device with an associated rotatable manoeuvring element which is arranged to move the platform, the person and the transmission device in a direction which has a vertical directional component along at least one supporting element, when the manoeuvring element is operated.
The rotational axis of the manoeuvring element may principally coincide with a rotational axis of the body joint training. By this is meant that the rotational axis of the manoeuvring element may deviate somewhat relative to the rotational axis of the joint and that the rotational axis of the joint is not completely parallel to the rotational axis of the manoeuvring element. In the case of the knee joint constituting the body joint training, the person's thighs may be somewhat apart, which results in the rotational axes of the two knees not being parallel, and the rotational axes of the two knees are not parallel to the rotational axis of the manoeuvring element either.
The training apparatus may include several independent transmission devices and associated manoeuvring elements.
This has the advantage of the training apparatus tilting as a signal to the person that an exercise is carried out differently by either leg, for example. The training apparatus may also be provided with manoeuvring elements which make it possible to carry out several exercises on the same apparatus.
The training apparatus may have two transmission devices which may be connected by at least one connection means. This has the advantage of the training apparatus being usable in, for example, a training situation in which, because of injury, there is a great difference in muscular strength in a group of muscles belonging to separate limbs. For example, the thigh muscle in one leg may be-weak because of injury and the thigh muscle may function well in the other leg.
The transmission device may include a gear. This has the advantage of the training apparatus being adjustable for persons of different body weights and different muscle strength. The transmission device may be fixed to the platform. This has the advantage of the transmission device following the vertical movement of the person, which makes it possible for the rotational axis of the manoeuvring element to maintain its position relative to the rotational axis of the body joint training.
The training apparatus may be provided with a dosing-down means. This has the advantage of persons who are too weak to operate the training apparatus in a training situation, in spite of said gear, being able to use the training apparatus until they have regained enough muscular strength to carry out the exercises without a dosing-down means.
The training apparatus may be provided with a vibration apparatus. The vibration apparatus may be arranged to output vibrations approximately in the same direction as the direction of contraction of the muscle training.
The training apparatus may be hanging freely. This has the advantage of the apparatus moving principally sideways if the person in the training apparatus causes, by his body movement, the common centre of gravity of the training apparatus and person to shift.
More particularly, the training apparatus may be hanging freely from two suspension organs. This has the advantage of enabling the training apparatus to be secured to an internal s ceiling structure. Still more particularly, the training apparatus may be suspended from a suspension device. This has the advantage of enabling the training apparatus to be suspended from a support if it is difficult to secure the training apparatus to the ceiling because of the ceiling height or too weak a ceiling structure, for example.
In a second aspect the invention relates to a training apparatus characterized by being arranged to be kept in balance by a person actively shifting his centre of gravity while carrying out an exercise.
is In an alternative embodiment the training apparatus may be arranged on a pair of rockers. In a further alternative embodiment the training apparatus may be provided with a floor-mounted helical spring. These alternative embodiments have the advantage of the apparatus getting a different moving pattern from that when hanging freely.
In what follows are described examples of a preferred embodiment which is visualized in the accompanying drawings, in which:
Figure 1 shows a training apparatus according to the invention, seen mainly from the front, hanging on two supporting elements from a fastening element;
Figures 2A-C show the training apparatus in use for training the quadriceps femoris muscle from a starting position with a large deflection at the knee joints (A) to fully extended knees (C) ;
Figure 3 shows, on a larger scale, a detail of the training apparatus for moving the supporting elements sideways;
Figure 4 shows a section of the training apparatus with means for dosing the load down;
Figure 5 shows the invention in an alternative embodiment viewed from one side;
Figure 6 shows the same embodiment as figure 5, viewed at an angle from the front;
Figure 7 shows the invention schematically in a front view, in another embodiment having one transmission device and hanging on two supporting elements;
Figure 8 shows the invention schematically in a front view, in a further embodiment having one transmission is device and hanging on one supporting element;
Figure 9 shows the invention schematically in a side view,
in another embodiment having floor-mounted, rigid and elongated supporting elements; and
Figure 10 shows the invention as in figure 9 with a tiltable seat for the performance of co-activating exercises.
In the drawings the reference numeral 1 indicates a training apparatus consisting of a platform 2, the training apparatus 1 hanging on two supporting elements 3 in the form of ropes zs which are attached, at a first end, to a fixed upper fastening element (not shown). In first and second embodiments, the training apparatus 1 is rotatably connected to a transmission device 4 on either side, as shown in figures 1 to 6. In what follows is described the transmission device 4,on the first side of the training apparatus 1, but it will be understood that this also includes the transmission device 4 on the second side of the training apparatus 1. The transmission device 4 is rotatable around an s axle 24 which is rotatably secured to the side plates 27 of the platform 2. To provide steady movement between the platform 2 and transmission device 4, the side plate 27 is provided with supporting wheels 25 which maintain a fixed distance between the transmission device 4 and the side plate 10 27. The rope 3 runs through a guide element 21, over a sheave groove 41a of a sheave 42a in the transmission device 4. At its second end, the rope 3 is provided with a fastening means 31 attached to a fastening element 43 in the transmission device 4. A transversal piece is 44 connects the transmission devices 4 on the first and second sides of the training apparatus 1. The transversal piece 44 is secured at either end to the transmission device 4 with a manoeuvring element 45. On the transversal piece 44 is attached a vibration apparatus 5. The transversal piece 44 may be removable. The vibration apparatus 5 may be removable.
The training apparatus is further provided with a brace 47 connecting the transmission devices 4 on the first and second sides of the training apparatus 1. At either end, the brace 47 is secured to the transmission device 4 with a spacer 48.
The brace 47 may also serve as a step to facilitate the access to a supporting element in the form of a seat 22 arranged on the platform 2. The supporting element 22 carries at least parts of the weight of a person 9 who is using the training apparatus 1. In alternative embodiments, the supporting element 22 may have a design which is adapted for other exercises. The brace 47 may be removable. The side plates 27 are each provided with a handle 23. The transmission device 4 as shown in figure 2 is provided with a gear in the form of three concentric sheaves 42a, 42b and 42c. The sheaves 42a, 42b, 42c are of different diameters and are provided with sheave grooves 41a, 41b and 41c, respectively. The sheaves 42a-c may have a non-circular shape s as shown for the sheave 42b. The axis 46 of the concentric sheaves 42a, 42b, 42c coincides with the axis 26 of the axle
Figure 2A shows the training apparatus 1 in a starting position. The person 9 positions himself on the supporting element 22 and slips his insteps behind the transversal piece 44 so that his knees are bent and the legs are under the person's thighs. As the person 9 straightens his knees, the manoeuvring element 45 will make the transmission device 4 rotate around its axis 26 and the ropes 3 will follow a greater portion of the sheave grooves 41a as shown in figures 2B and 2C. This results in the training apparatus 1 being lifted up the ropes 3 against gravity until the person 9 has extended his knees completely, as shown in figure 2C. In figures 2A to 2C is outlined a schematic floor 8 to show that the training apparatus 1 has moved against gravity. In figure 2C the sheave 42b has been left out to simplify the drawing.
Figure 3 shows, on a larger scale, more details of the guide element 21. The rope 3 runs over a guide sheave 210. The guide sheave 210 is supported in a sheave housing 211 which is secured to a locking piece 212. The locking piece 212 surrounds a locking rail 213 and is movable sideways along the locking rail 213. The locking rail 213 is provided with several through holes 214 providing attachment for a locking pin 215. The guide element 21 is held in a fixed position relative to the platform 2 by means of a mounting bracket 216. The distance between the holes 214 and guide sheave 210 is adjusted such that in a locked position the guide sheave 210 will lie flush with either the sheave 42a, 42b or 42c.
The fastening means 31 at the second end of the rope 3 is a hook. The hook 31 is hooked into the fastening element 43 which is formed as a loop. The hook 31 is freely movable sideways along the loop 43 as shown in figure 1 and figures 2A-C. The rope 3 will thereby lie in the same plane through the guide sheave 210, sheaves 42a-c up to the loop 43.
Figure 4 shows the training apparatus 1 provided with a dosing-down means 6 in the form of an elastic cord 61. The elastic cord 61 is attached, at a first end, to the rope 3 with a quick-coupling 62 arranged to be moved up or down the rope 3 when the elastic cord 61 is not strained, and to lock as the elastic cord 61 is strained. The elastic cord 61 is provided with a hook 63 at its second end. This is hooked onto a hook fastener 64 as shown in figure 3, on the side plate 27. As shown in figure 4, two elastic cords 61, 61' may be used on either side of the training apparatus 1 for further dosing-down. The elastic cords 61 are available in various designs of different elasticities.
Figures.5 and 6 show the invention in a second embodiment. In the figures 5 and 6 are shown only one side plate 27 of the training apparatus 1 and the associated transmission device 4 and manoeuvring element 45, but the figures are to be understood in such a way that the training apparatus 1 is provided with corresponding devices on its other side. The manoeuvring element 45 is provided with a-rest 49 for the person 9 to be able to move the manoeuvring element 45 with an instep 91. The manoeuvring element 45 is rotatable around an axis 78 which substantially coincides with that of the joint training, here the rotational axis of the knee 92. The manoeuvring element 45 is fixedly connected to a toothed wheel 71. The toothed wheel 71 is connected via a drive belt 72 to a gear 73 of a kind known per se. The drive belt 72 may be a toothed belt or a chain. The gear 73 is connected to a first reel 74 via a connection element 75. The first reel 74 is fixedly connected to a second reel 76. The second reel 76 s is arranged to reel in the supporting element 3 in the form of a line, which causes the training apparatus 1 to move against gravity. The line 3 has been passed through the guide element 21 and over a running wheel 77. The line 3 is provided with a stop 32. In the lower position of the training apparatus 1, the training apparatus 1 rests on the stop 32. The toothed wheel 71, first reel 74, second reel 76 and running wheel 77 are supported in the side plate 27.
Figures 5 and 6 are to be understood in such a way that the apparatus 1 is suspended via the lines 3 from a fastening is element above the training apparatus 1. The portion of the line 3 located above the guide element 21 is not shown in figures 5 and 6.
In an alternative embodiment, not shown, the running wheel 77 of the training apparatus 1 on one side may be connected to the corresponding running wheel 77 on the other side of the training apparatus 1 by an axle not shown. The axle may be split and arranged with means connecting, in one position, the running wheels 77 fixingly, and letting, in another position, the running wheels 77 be independently rotatable.
An example of such a means is a sliding sleeve with internal teeth which are moved over teeth arranged on the surface of the axle.
Figure 7 shows the training apparatus 1 schematically in a third embodiment. This embodiment is particularly suitable for training the rotational musculature of the upper body.
The seat 22 of the platform 2 is provided with a back rest 111. Centrally on its underside, the platform 2 is provided with an axle 124 directed vertically, which will substantially be an extension of the person's 9 (not shown in the figure) spine in its position of use. The axle 124 is provided with two rigidly connected, elongated manoeuvring elements 45 extending outwards, beyond the platform 2 and further upwards and inwards above the platform 2 to the termination of the manoeuvring elements 45 on the upper side of the platform 2, as shown in figure 7. The rotational axis 126 of the manoeuvring elements 45 coincides with the io longitudinal axis of the axle 124 and is thereby substantially an extension of the person's spine, which is the joint training as this exercise is being carried out. The axle 124 is provided with a transmission device 4. The manoeuvring elements 45 are connected to the transmission device 4. The transmission device 4 is provided with a gear system (not shown) and a reel (not shown) pulling the supporting element 3 in the form of a wire onto the reel when the manoeuvring element 45 is rotated, thereby making the training apparatus 1 move in the vertical direction along the wire 3. The axle 124 is provided with an elongated guide unit 120 projecting on two sides of the platform 2. The axle 124 is attached to the middle portion 127 of the guide unit 120.
At its end portion 129, the guide unit 120 is provided with a guide sheave 121. The back rest 111 is provided with at least one supporting arm 112 which is parallel to the guide unit 120. In figure 7 are shown two supporting arms 112. At its end portion, the supporting arm 112 is provided with a guide 114 arranged to be movable along the wire 3. The wire 3 runs from the transmission device 4 through the guide sheave 121, through the guide 114 and further to a fastening element (not shown).
Figure 8 shows the training apparatus 1 schematically in a fourth embodiment. This embodiment is particularly suitable for training the rotational musculature of the upper body.
The seat 22 of the platform 22 is provided with a back rest 111. The platform 2 is provided with a frame 150 which is constituted, in the position of use, by a lower, horizontal 5 portion 152 extending outwards from the seat 22, a vertical portion 154 of a length sufficient for a person 9 (not shown in this figure) to be able to sit inside the frame 150, and an upper, horizontal portion 156 terminated in a fastening portion 158 above the seat 22. The fastening portion 158 is 10 provided with a transmission device 4. The transmission device 4 is provided with two rigidly connected, elongated manoeuvring elements 45 extending outwards and downwards in the position of use, and being terminated in a position of use, as shown in figure 8, practical for operation by the 15 hands of the person 9 operating the apparatus 1. The manoeuvring elements 45 are connected to the transmission device 4. The transmission device 4 is provided with a gear system (not shown) and a reel (not shown) pulling the supporting element 3 in the form of a rope onto the reel when the manoeuvring element 45 is rotated, thereby making the training apparatus 1 move in the vertical direction along the rope 3. The transmission device 4 is placed above the person's 9 head, and the rotational axis 126 of the manoeuvring element 45 will substantially be an extension the person's 9 spine, which will be the rotating joint during training of the rotational musculature of the upper body.
Figure 9 shows a schematic sketch of the training apparatus 1 in a fifth embodiment. The transmission device 4 of the training apparatus 1 is arranged to move vertically along a floor-mounted, rigid and elongated supporting element 3. The figure is to be understood in such a way that the person is sitting on a platform 2, not shown, positioned between two supporting elements 3. The transmission device 4, the manoeuvring element 45 and the person 9 are shown in solid lines in a lower position and shown in dashed lines in a higher position, in which the manoeuvring element 45 has been moved forwards by the person 9. In this embodiment, the supporting element 3 may be constituted by, for example, an elongated metal profile or a pitch rack.
Figure 10 shows the training apparatus 1 in principally the same embodiment as figure 9, but the platform 2 / seat 22 (not shown) is tiltable relative to the transmission device lo. 4. The exercise will thereby have a co-activating effect as the person 9 will have to keep his balance during the performance of a body-weight exercise. In a further embodiment, the training apparatus 1 may be arranged for coactivating training only, as the transmission device 4 can be arranged to disconnect the vertical movement along the supporting element 3 when the manoeuvring element 45 is operated. This is shown in figure 10 by the person 9 and manoeuvring element 45 being shown in two positions by a solid line and a dashed line, respectively, while the transmission device 4 is stationary.
In alternative designs, not shown, of the embodiments shown in figures 1-7, the training apparatus 1 may be provided with means for moving parallel to the direction of gravity on floor-mounted supporting elements 3, for example pitch racks.
In further alternative designs, not shown, of the embodiments shown in figures 1-7, the training apparatus 1 may be provided with means for moving at an angle so that a component of force is parallel to the direction of gravity.
For example, the training apparatus 1 may be placed on sloping supporting elements 3 such as rails or pitch racks.
In a further alternative embodiment, not shown, the kinetic resistance on the manoeuvring element 45 may be provided entirely or partially by an electromagnetic resistance / electromagnetic brake which may be provided with an electronic control to provide varying resistance through the course of movement. In a further alternative embodiment, not s shown, the kinetic resistance on the manoeuvring element 45 may be provided entirely or partially by a hydraulic resistance.
In examples 1-10 reference is made to the training apparatus 1 as shown in figures 1-4.
Example 1
The supporting element 22 in the training apparatus 1 was adjusted for training the front thigh muscle, the quadriceps femoris muscle, that is. When the person 9 is sitting on the supporting element 22, the knee joint is near the axis 26, 46, so that the rotational axis of the knee is approximately parallel to the axis 26, 46 and approximately coinciding with this axis. The desired weight dosing is set by passing the rope 3 over the desired sheave 42a-c in the respective sheave groove 41a-c by means of the guide element 21. The guide element 21 is locked in the desired position with the locking pin 215. The person places his insteps behind the transversal piece 44 and extends his legs, the quadriceps femoris carrying out dynamic, concentric muscular work. The transversal piece 44 is moved forwards and up. The movement of the transversal piece 44 via the manoeuvring elements 45, which are adjustably attached to the transmission device 4, makes this move around its axis 46. The rotation of the transmission device 4 causes the sheaves 42a-c and fastening element 43 to be rotated. The distance from the guide element 21 to the fastening element 43 along the rope 3 increases with the rotation as an increasing portion of the length of the rope 3 will lie in the sheave groove 41a-c. This will lead to the training apparatus 1 with the person 9 being lifted up the rope 3. The person 9 lowers himself in a controlled way into the starting position by slowly bending his knees, the quadriceps femoris then carrying out dynamic eccentric muscular work. The centre of gravity of the person 9 lies above and to the side of the axis 26 of the training apparatus 1. The training apparatus 1 may tilt forwards or backwards on an axis extending through the centres of the two guide sheaves 210. Therefore, at the same time as the knee is 1.0 being extended or bent, the person 9 must seek to hold his balance by holding on to the handles 23 and muscularly counteracting, with his upper body, the tilting forwards or backwards of the training apparatus 1.
Example 2
The person 9 carries out the same exercise as described in example 1. The person 9 chooses a sheave 42 which is noncircular with a varying radius. The sheave 42b is secured to the transmission device 4 in such a way that, in the starting position, the rope 3 lies over a first portion of the sheave groove 41b of a relatively small radius. As the transversal piece 44 is moved forwards, the rope 3 will be guided over a second portion of the sheave groove 41b having a relatively larger radius, which means that a greater muscular effort must be made to move the transversal piece 44 further forwards. This portion of the sheave 42b is adapted to correspond to the work range in which the quadriceps femoris is at its strongest. At the end of the knee extension, the sheave 42b is provided with a third portion of a smaller radius than the second portion. This means that less muscular work is required to complete the movement.
Example 3
The person 9 carries out the same exercise as in example 1 or 2. To reduce the muscular work required, especially in the lower position of the training apparatus 1, the exercise is dosed down with the elastic cord 61. One, alternatively two elastic cord(s) is/are attached in pairs and tautened to a maximum between the rope 3 and training apparatus 1 on either side. There is a choice of elastic cords 61 of different maximum pulling power, for example 30 kg or 50 kg. The dosing-down has its greatest effect at the beginning of the exercise as the pulling power of the elastic cord 61 decreases as the training apparatus 1 is lifted on the ropes
Example 4
The person 9 carries out the same exercise, as in example 1 or 2. To reduce the muscular work required, the exercise is dosed down with a counterweight which is not shown in the figures. A wire or similar (not shown in the figures) is secured at its first end to the hook fastener 64 of the training apparatus 1. The wire is passed over a first pulley attached near the anchoring point of the ropes 3 in the ceiling, further over a second pulley and the second end of the wire is secured to a counterweight of the same weight as the training apparatus 1. A corresponding wire is attached to the other side of the training apparatus 1 and is terminated at the same counterweight. The dosing-down entails that the person 9 will carry out a pure body-weight exercise.
Example 5
The person 9 carries out the same exercise as in example 1 or 2. To increase the muscular work required, the exercise is dosed up. A weight disc holder of standard Olympic size (not shown in the figures) is attached to the transmission device 4 in such a way that the axis of the weight disc holder coincides with the axis 26, 46 and the desired weight discs can be slipped onto and secured to the weight holder on the outside of the transmission device 4.
Example 6
The person 9 carries out the same exercise as in example 1 or 5 2. To increase the co-activation of other muscles and to increase the neuromotor stimulus, the vertical distance between the guide element 21 and sheaves 42a-c is increased.
Example 7
The person 9 carries out the same exercise as described in io one of the examples 1 to 6. A vibration apparatus 5 is attached to the transversal piece 44. The vibration apparatus 5 is adjusted to the desired speed and provides increased muscle stimulation as the exercise is being carried out.
Example 8 15 The person 9 carries out the same exercise as described in one of the examples 1 to 6. The transversal piece 44 is removed and the training apparatus 1 is provided with two rests 49 for the feet as shown in figure 6. The first rest 49 is attached to the transmission device 4 on one side of the 20 training apparatus 1, and the second rest is attached to the transmission device 4 on the other side of the training apparatus 1. In this example the co-activating effect of the training apparatus 1 is further increased as the training apparatus 1 will tilt sideways if the person 9 applies load of unequal force to the transmission devices 4.
Example 9
The platform 2 is provided with a height-adjustable step below the training apparatus 1 (not shown in the figures).
The supporting element 22 is adjusted for positioning the upper arms in such a way that the rotational axis of the elbow joint will approximately coincide with the axis 26, 46.
The transmission device 4 is adjusted for training the biceps brachii with sheaves 42a-c of suitable diameters and with manoeuvring elements 45 of suitable lengths so that the transversal piece 44 will be in a suitable position. The person 9 stands with both legs on the step below the training apparatus 1 and places his upper arms over the supporting element 22. The adjustments of the resistance, dosing-down, dosing-up, increased co-activation and vibration can be made in a manner corresponding to that described in examples 2 to
Example 10
The person 9 carries out the same exercise as described in example 9. The transversal piece 44 is removed and the two manoeuvring elements 45 are provided with rests 49 for the person's hands. In this example the co-activating effect of the training apparatus 1 is increased further as the training apparatus 1 will tilt sideways if the person 9 applies load of unequal force to the transmission devices 4.
Example 11
Below the supporting element 22, the training apparatus 1 as shown in figures 5 and 6 is provided with a floor-mounted, powerful helical spring. The suspension means 3, gear 73, reels 74 and 76, connection element 75 and running wheel 77 are replaced with an electromagnetic resistance (not shown).
The person 9 carries out an exercise for the front thigh muscle. The training apparatus 1 will not move against gravity but will move forwards/backwards/sideways according to how the person balances his upper body and arms. The person tries to keep the training apparatus 1 as still as possible while the exercise is carried out.
With his knowledge of relevant exercises, the person skilled in the art will know how the training apparatus 1 described can be adjusted for still other exercises in addition to those described in the examples.